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8

As KMSTR says, you don't. Impact does not have an italic variant, nor a bold, for that matter. Many consumer-based software like Microsoft Office allow so-called faux bold and italic for all fonts installed: if a separate font file for these alternate styles is not installed, the software simply slants the characters (for faux italic) or makes them thicker ...


5

It is because somewhere there is a font which is not licensed to embed in PDFs, just as the warning states. The PDF will look fine if the font is installed on the system. Therefore it will look okay on your system. However, any system which does not contain the font may not render that particular font properly.


4

In addition to Scott's answer, you can circumvent this issue by converting all type in the offending font into outlines: Type > Create Outlines. This will markedly increase your .pdf file size if you're using the font a lot (for say, body text). This way, you don't have to embed any of the info in the font file--all your letters are shapes after all. Be ...


4

Can you use one of the front slash line from the x letter and work something out with that? It could give the logo a nice flow. My suggestion is a 5 minute work with bad proportions, but it might give you an idea of something....


4

For word, you can change the Corbel typeface to lining figures or old style figure by clicking the flyout menu in the font area of Word's navigation. Then click on the Advanced tab and use the drop down menu beside Number Forms. You can adjust ligatures and all sorts here too! It works for Outlook and Publisher too apparently. Source: ...


3

This Logo was probably inspired by Cipher font. They added a lachrymal ear (in yellow) to the 'g' in the logotype much like Georgia or Baskerville.


3

Historically, the single storey a was the italics version, as it more emulated handwriting. Many geometric sans faces also adopted the single storey version. But there's no hard-and-fast rule one way or the other. Both are acceptable glyphs.


2

Those are typically accessed through the Glyphs panel in Adobe applications, usually under Type > Glyphs. This shows all characters in the font file, allowing you to pick and choose. Double click a character to insert it at your text cursor's current location. You can even click and hold a character in the palette when it has a small triangle in the lower ...


2

Nice question. It seems to be some non-latin fonts designed to resemble latin-ish, but in my opinion is very difficult judge whether they resemble latin for all the world cultures or not. To be more clear, I'm used to latin characters and for me your examples could look like Devanagari, Kufic Arabic and Katakana characters. I'm not so sure that this ...


2

Here's a quick take on your original idea using the same lines as the X to create balance and combining parts to reduce the overall size of the logo. Personally I believe logos should come down to the simplest form possible to create a striking presence.


2

The height/width ratio depends on the particular typeface, some (e.g., Times Roman) being inherently narrower than others (such as Bookman). Many typefaces have Compressed, Condensed, Regular and/or Extended fonts in the family. Obviously the height/width average is very different for each. The range spans a wide spectrum from the incredibly narrow (Universe ...


2

I work with Chinese-English prints a lot and usually people use separate fonts for Chinese and English. And like Ryan said, if English uses serif fonts, then Chinese uses serif fonts, same for sans-serif. We don't use Chinese font for English text because Chinese font is double byte and often will display latin characters in a monospace manner (unattractive ...


2

I think the reality is you can do it either way. I would certainly try to use a font up front that supports English and Chinese, if that failed though I wouldn't lose any sleep over selecting a different font for the Chinese version. Just try to keep the overall feel the same between the two. If you use a simple sans-serif English font then try to find a ...


1

According to Typekit help, you're only allowed to serve fonts on your client's website if you are on a business plan, and page views of that plan start at 2M. It also suggests that you could set up a Typekit account for each client, as you proposed. Personally, I would go for the second option, avoiding to absorb a recurring cost that depends on customer ...


1

There's 2 official answers from the SIL site (that maintains and documents the SIL/OFL licence): Is subsetting a web font considered modification? Web Fonts and Reserved Font Names The summary (at least as I unserstand it) is: you are allowed to convert into WOFF format while keeping the reserved font name, as long as you dont subset. Other formats or ...


1

Solved my problem. I think it was a Windows issue. I tried to remove and reinstall all Roboto fonts but after that Photoshop started to show an error every time I try to open a file with Roboto font in it: Selected font failed during last operation. If problem persists, please disable the font. I removed all Roboto fonts. I found this link from Adobe ...


1

Customize your font! If the conditions are right, it's actually pretty easy. I just had a case where I needed to use the lining figures of a font for a Web project. However, OpenType features aren't 100% reliable yet. Also, the webfont service that was hosting the font I was trying to use created a subset that excluded the lining figures anyways, so I had ...


1

Maybe smaller horizontal line on f now, with less space between letters :)



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