Hot answers tagged

48

johnp already mentioned using an automated font identification tool might prove troublesome without a rendered sample, but you could always just make your own rendered sample. It doesn't have to be perfect since the auto-identifiers build in some tolerance to broaden the search. Luckily, your glyphs are easy enough to create: WhatTheFont returns a few ...


22

If you are looking for a font which specific features, I would recommend using font identification apps/sites based on the traits you have in mind. In your case, it would be helpful to upload your final logotype to online ID sites to find something similar. Identifont is a useful tool to find a typeface based on some questions on a font's anatomy. Using ...


7

You can trademark a logo. And a logo can be made from a typeface. It's less protectable than something custom, but protectable none-the-less. But parody is a perfectly acceptable. I'd find a new printer.


6

If you would like to try a decent FREE font exchange go to http://www.dafont.com/. You can type in the actual letters you want to see in the fonts they have listed. They have it grouped very well and it may take a few minutes but I think you'll find what you want, be able to download and install quickly and be on your way. Try the "Techno" section first. ...


6

Sounds a bit like a chicken and egg conundrum! Is Google following trends, or creating them? The most likely answer is: Both (Google is a Schrödinger chicken!). I think the gist of it is the issue of brand identity and consistency vs change. The concept of a brand is that it should remain unchanged over its life - to communicate the continuity of its ...


4

I will preface this by saying that I am not a lawyer. I am pretty familiar with font legal/business issues from my decade-plus at Adobe working with their lead font lawyer, and 20 years in the type business in various roles dealing with IP. But that said, these are legal issues, and consulting a lawyer is an excellent idea. One such lawyer who is well known ...


4

I found this one but the A is diferent, it could be a modification? i hope this helps http://www.fonts.com/font/fontfabric-type-foundry/intro-rust


2

\e61e is technically this character:  in UTF-8 encoding (the default encoding for CSS - this can be changed using @charset). So that's the literal answer to your question. But as Joonas mentioned in the comments, a font can map a character like this to a symbol, in this case an icon, of their choosing. So in actuality, what you're seeing is likely ...


2

This is only a partial answer. The rest of the question is addressed very well by Thomas Phinney’s answer Otherwise, if I'm not careful, it sounds like anyone could just copyright my work as their own Copyright does not work like this. If you created something and did not sign any contracts to transfer your copyright, you hold the copyright. If you ...


2

There aren't enough characters to make the best assessment of the font. But tools such as the following may get you very close: WhatTheFont Identifont Try ignoring the shadow as it may or may not be part of the font family.


1

I immediately thought, "IBM Selectric" when I looked at the paper you linked to. I did a little searching and found someone had scanned their IBM Selectric typeball fonts: [http://typebarhead.blogspot.com/2012/04/ibm-selectric-typeball-fonts.html][1] I'm pretty darn sure it's Letter Gothic 12. Look at the lowercase L and R for comparison. Looks the same ...


1

Basicaly if you are not reselling or distributing the fonts themselves, you are fine. Fonts are treated as software. So the copyrighted thing is the font file. Not the font itself. You can't be sued for using some font, for creating poster (if you bought the font, seperately or with OS). You can be sued for sending the font file to someone else. The people ...



Only top voted, non community-wiki answers of a minimum length are eligible