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5

Unlike in Gimp or other applications there is a strict separation of font family vs. font style in SVG, and in Inkscape. Therefore we will be presented the font family only from selection in the top panel. To change the font style (as they were defined with the installed font) we can either use the default style icons from the tool panel, or adjust it using ...


5

"Weight" is highly subjective. The designer typically designs a 'regular weight', which would be '500' in the TTF units. After that, a lighter design gets a lower number and a darker design the higher number. The full range of 100..900 is to cater for everything from Ultra Light to Extra Black. Thus, the value only 'means' something in relation to lighter ...


4

In legal terms, the client must purchase fonts. Whether you do that on their behalf or they do it, it needs to be done. You generally can't legally give away fonts any more than you could give away Illustrator. Fonts are software.


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I think section 2 sums it up fairly clearly (well, as clearly as licenses can be): Grant of Copyright License. Subject to the terms and conditions of this License, each Contributor hereby grants to You a perpetual, worldwide, non-exclusive, no-charge, royalty-free, irrevocable copyright license to reproduce, prepare Derivative Works of, publicly ...


2

'Manually' align to eye That's your answer. The task of aligning type is pretty much relegated to the 'trained eye'. The reason is that optically aligning type doesn't usually have any relation to mechanically aligning it. In other words, the computer simply can't figure out what looks right visually--only mathematically. Some tips: large round ...


2

Looks like Peignot Bold to me!


2

Choosing a typeface is about pairing the elements in your design together. Designing an invite for a high-fashion event? Consider a Didone. Working on a menu for a BBQ Joint? Consider some vernacular retro wood type. Working on a thesis? A sturdy serif text face is probably a safe bet. The key is that you're pairing the typeface with the design moreso than ...


1

You didn't specify what type of design work you're doing or what platform you're working on. If you're working on Windows machines, there's a decent amount of PortableApps that might suit your needs such as Gimp, Inkscape & Blender (3D). Modern browsers like Chrome and Firefox have powerful built-in features for web development and can be extended ...


1

Using proper typographic terminology will help us understand what you are asking here. Tracking, the space between all characters, can be manipulated with CSS using the letter-spacing property. This has wide browser compatibility and shouldn't be an issue at all. Kerning, the space between two characters such as within a logo, is not manipulable with CSS. ...


1

I think you can use a comic font, which is appropriate for a comic, but still improve the legibility by changing other aspects of your typography: Use a font that uses both upper and lowercase for the longer explanations (all caps might be fine for titles Give the texts more "breathing room", separate them more from the container edges Be careful with your ...


1

That font definitely feels unprofessional to me. If you want to keep with the form and feeling but add readability & professionalism, I'd probably use a 'loud' font that looks good in all caps (or small caps, which may be a good solution here). Possible free fonts that I can think of that may work well for you: Bebas Neue Montserrat Gotham, ...


1

Quark Convert? ;-) In InDesign these are called "Paragraph Styles". This functionality is not built into InDesign, but it can be done using scripting. In fact, it has been done; see, for example, http://indesignsecrets.com/print-out-style-sheet-specs.php. The download link gives you a .zip file. Extract it, which will give you a folder called 'TSRC2' (when ...


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The typefaces on the football shirts are most of the time custom made. Look at these for example: http://www.designboom.com/design/nike-world-cup-fonts-07-01-2014/


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You could play with Bebas a bit and get the effect you're looking for.


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Can it be done? Sure, I did exactly this in Javascript, where InDesign is only used to draw curves with. The rest is done entirely with Javascript. All "font builder software" does is gather all the necessary information, format it according to the specification(s), and then write it out a file. Read everything you can find on the specifications for the ...


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I personally tend to think, in cases where the letters are so simple and geometric, that they are done by hand. Doing the letters of your logo or acronym by hand gives you extra flexibility and infinite possibilities to get a result exactly to your liking. It is normal for someone to start their design based on a font, but I find it hard to believe a ...


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You could try this software: Find my Font Free or you could try asking your query at Software Recommendation StackExchange


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Pass #1 "Get it approximately right" -- Align as many edges of each character as you can to a 4-pixel grid before you resize. If you're pressed for time, the most important edges are the outermost edges of each character, and the horizontal internal edges. Shrink, (I used bilinear interpolation), down to 98x98px to check which edges are still ...



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