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7

That's Voltage by Laura Worthington.


7

Is it normal practice to use two different fonts for print material and email? Yes. Actually, it's normal practice do not specify any font in email. Email is text and not everyone wants HTML formatted email. And most people don't want to have to download a font just to view their email--especially on a mobile network.


4

By far the thinnest historical fraktur I am aware of is Elfen-Fraktur (literally elf fraktur). A digitalisation is available here: Astloch (literally knothole) is a recently designed blackletter font, which is even thinner, but lacks a long s and typical blackletter ligatures. Also, some letter shapes are not historical, e.g., H, I, J, K and Z. ...


3

If you're on a Mac, you may be able to view licensing information in Font Book, and for Windows, open fonts settings in Control Panel. You can possibly try a font creation app, such as Glyphs or Fontforge to view license information.


2

There is no typical answer for your question, there is no rule, however you can follow you own methodology for the work, working with a template and graphic, text and paragraph style to ensure a consistency and unity for your work. For the aspect ratio: you should gather all your illustration graph and plots and find the best way to present it preserving ...


2

While this not directly answers your questions, here is what I do (except for well-justified exceptions): Always work in the target journal’s style. For pure plots: For the first plot: Decide whether it should be a one-column or two-column plot. Adjust the height of what is plotted such that the information I want to convey is best visible and I also do ...


2

I have no knowledge of, nor have I ever been able to find, a truly light or thin Fraktur font. These are some of the pretty lightweights that I've found: Kabinett-Fraktur Regular (aka Fraktur Mager) is pretty lightweight for a Fraktur font. Lautenbach is a more modern approach, not really a 'classic' Fraktur, but also more readable imho. Strassburg ...


2

I have resolved the issue, the culprit was the font's PostScript name (which I naively never changed). I'm guessing it has to do with the caching of fonts based on PostScript names or something. I don't understand it exactly. To change the PostScript name, I've used FontLab Studio 5. In Studio 5, there's a "Font Info" icon to the top left of the "Font" ...


2

Oh how I hate that face ... Mistral, King of the Ugly Scripts.


2

A font file usually contains only vector information on the shapes of glyphs. Some fonts also come with so-called bitmap strikes for different font sizes though, which are usually hand-corrected for the best rendering. I guess that you have such a font and only changed the vector information while the bitmaps are unchanged. In some programs you now see the ...


1

Since this is a jpeg, you will have to turn each letter into a vector. The quick way but not very good way of turning a jpeg into a vector is by going to Object -> Image Trace -> Make. Red: You can then select Image Trace Panel to fine tune the selection. This will bring up a window where you can select options so Illustrator knows how you want the ...


1

The problem appears to be with those fonts, at least that's what it looks like to me. You can see how poorly made the font is and that some of its characters are incomplete.


1

As far as I am aware, it is not at all necessary, assuming all fonts have been embedded. However, I will always include a rasterised (JPG) copy of the artwork when sent to the printers along with the PDF, Just to be SURE their software/RIP is rendering the pdf as expected. Never rely on "It's supposed to" - things corrupt, versions change etc. You can't ...


1

What The Font is the most popular one: https://www.myfonts.com/WhatTheFont/ There are others. FYI, if you're getting font files from other designers, unless the the license allows for re-distribution, they are likely breaking the license of the fonts. Technically, you should have your own license of the font if you are going to work on the files further ...


1

There are a bunch of free font-identifiers that you can use to detect font. Crop the section of your image that contains the fonts that you need identify and upload them in one the following sites, it should get you closer to the real font. In most case, stylized fonts are hard to detect, as they could be modified for a cosmetic effect which makes it look ...


1

If you want to get that exact effect, and ok with spending some time, and familiar with Adobe Illustrator, you might wanna follow the steps here. Or if you're more of an Adobe Photoshop user, you might wanna follow the steps in the article over here.


1

I am the designer of Dequindre, a font mentioned in one of the other answers. I'll be releasing it soon (I neglected it as I was finishing up my MFA). It will contain a historical long s and a number of ligatures (mostly of the f_ variety). It has 355 glyphs and has the necessary accents to support a good number of languages, so for instance if you for some ...


1

You shouldn't provide the native editable files. If you do, you should charge a high price for this since it contains the "recipe" of how you did your layouts and how you achieved some special effects. Some clients use editable files to learn tricks or will distribute them to another designer who will gladly take the credit for your work. The points you ...


1

The differences are usually very minor ones and sometimes very hard to notice. It can be a slightly different kerning for example. None are better than the other. The important thing is to try to stick to the same version when possible. Otherwise your publishing or design software might not recognize the version you're using and will show the font as ...



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