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126

At its core, There isn't really anything wrong with Comic Sans. It was designed for a purpose - comic-book-style speech bubbles primarily. It did a good job at that - if you're going to have Microsoft Bob talk to you on a screen, Comic Sans feels more 'right' than Times New Roman. Three things have contributed to Comic Sans' unpopularity, in my view. ...


102

There are technical, compatibility, legal, authenticity, and subjective reasons for not using it. I'm going to go through each in turn listing out the reasons with examples and references. Starting with: Hitler freaks out over Comic Sans Technical Reasons There are a handful of purely technical reasons not to use it. The first, was a lack of italic ...


53

In many fonts you will indeed find hardly any difference between using the Unicode characters for Roman numerals and just composing them from stardard Latin letters. For example, the following shows Louis VII (top) and Louis Ⅶ (bottom, using codepoints for Roman numerals) rendered with FreeSans: Apart from a tiny difference in spacing, which was propably ...


35

Comic Sans is a poorly made font because it succeeds neither at resembling actual comic book handwriting, nor printed lettering. For comparison, here is a well designed comic book font called Crimefighter BB. The above example is italicized and all caps, so while a great font for comics, it is not exactly all-purpose. But there are plenty of other great ...


30

I think Helvetica's biggest strength (and thus is greatest weakness) is just how "neutral" of a typeface it is. It really can work well in all sorts of situations and applications because of how balanced and neutral it is. But by the same token, it becomes "bland" - the office beige color of typefaces. I would never say Helvetica is superior to any other ...


23

It's got to do with the legal distinction between a font and a typeface. Fonts being the digital implementation of an original typeface design. The Akzidenz-Grotesk typeface may be over a hundred years old and out of copyright, but the font that happens to share its name and is obviously based on it, is a new and distinct legal object, subject to its own ...


21

TL;DR The Unicode consortium recommends using the latin letter where possible and not the numeral, which where included for compatibility with East-Asian typography. The full story : (with justification of the above assertion) Unless you are doing some East-Asian typography, using the (non-archaic) Roman numeral characters from unicode (U+2160 — U+217F) is ...


20

Of the original "web-safe" (that is, as close to universal as you'll get on the Web) sans-serifs (Arial, Impact, Tahoma, Trebuchet MS, Verdana), Verdana tends to get the most love. It's well-designed and is designed to be readable on the screen. It was designed by Matthew Carter, a respected typeface designer, and the design itself is pretty original, so it ...


20

How you write is like how you dress. It's not about practicality, it's about how you present yourself. It reflects how much thought and effort you put into your appearance. It strongly influences your audience's first impression before you even open your mouth, and it colors what you have to say throughout the presentation. In this metaphor, Futura would be ...


20

You are asking a few questions here. Is simply typesetting a company name in a font a logo? Yes. It certainly can be. It's it the best solution? Sometimes. But often it's not the best solution. Can I send a copy of a commercial font I used to a client? No. If it's a commercial font, meaning you purchased a license, then if the client wants to ...


19

Typefaces become popular for a number of reasons, partly technology (which often drives fashion -- "Because I can" is a more potent driver than most people realize), partly the cultural milieu within which they fit and become associated, partly the mood they invoke (or don't). The grotesks in general arrived on the typographic scene at a time when Western ...


18

I instantly recommend you to look at the website Typography for Lawyers ( http://www.typographyforlawyers.com/ ) - in particular the font recommendations http://www.typographyforlawyers.com/?p=587 )


18

Objectively you've already mostly answered it in your question: neutral In that it's 'plain' and not overly decorated, this is certainly true. Helvetica in a lot of situations doesn't impart any additional meaning (intentional or otherwise) beyond the words it is forming. well-glyphed I'm not sure I've heard that particular term before, but I ...


17

There's nothing wrong using Comic Sans when it's appropriate: for comics (duh), informal publications, and applications targeted towards children. It's meant to have both legible and handwritten attributes. Here are two completely legitimate examples: Since it's a font that comes packaged with Windows and the majority of users don't download or install ...


16

While the style you're trying to get across will ultimately need some manual vector manipulation, here are some typefaces to get you started:


16

Professional freelance designers buy high quality commercial fonts. It's possible that you may find cheaper alternatives in free fonts. However, a lot of free fonts don't offer full glyphs and other intricacies that high quality commercial fonts offer. You don't have to buy a bunch of fonts up front, or even the entire family, that'd be costly. But as you ...


16

There is a great article called Designing for Dyslexics, and it's divided in three parts. Part 3 is about typography: Part 1 (Definition of dyslexia, population size, implications/effects) Part 2 (Lower color contrast & visually impaired users) Part 3 (Typography, layouts, language style, information architecture, screen readers) Here is a extract, ...


16

You may find this answer slightly off-topic, but let's look at what the case mixing means in that particular example rather than in general. To get some context, it's helpful to look at the other varieties of peanut butter offered by this brand. In this context, I think it's clear that each design is trying to convey something about the product's ...


16

First of all, it is possible to simple have a typographic logo solution. Logos do not have to be graphic marks or use an original font. If your client is happy with what you've made as a standalone logo, then you should be able to create outlines out of the logo and send him a vector form of the logo without going against the copyright. However, perhaps ...


15

Characters that could be interchanged, indeed, would save money in the days of moveable type. That said, the '1' and 'l' were given spots in the typical job case: When typewriters came along, the mechanics dictates that the fewer characters meant the fewer bars needed, which was a huge benefit giving the limited space. As such, early typewriters omitted ...


15

They're almost interchangeable - but there's a difference of emphasis that can be useful. If you talk about the typeface, your focus is on the end result, some type's appearance and aesthetics in use. It might have come from a font, or it might not: hand-painted signs, graffiti art, comic lettering, calligraphy, logos etc can all have distinctive typefaces ...


14

A glyph is an individual character. It might be a letter, an accented letter, a ligature, a punctuation mark, a dingbat, etc. A font is a digital file which is used to display a typeface, which contains the entire upper- and lowercase alphabet as well as punctuation, numbers, and other special characters.


13

There are two reasons ClearType text is so crisp. it uses subpixel rendering. I don't think Photoshop supports that. it uses aggressive hinting to fit lines into the pixel grid You can type your text in Notepad, screenshot it with some nice convenient tool, and paste it into Photoshop with blending mode Multiply (because it's black text on a white ...


13

I think the "Gothic" and "Mincho" styles are mixed quite often, even in magazines/newspaper-like publications, like sans-serif and serif fonts are mixed in Western publications. Ads have all sorts of different typography, and Mincho is always the type for all situations, like Times. So of course there are Kaku/Maru fonts mixed with Mincho. How fortunate such ...


13

Using Comic Sans in your Powerpoint presentation at a TED Talk is the equivalent of wearing a Sponge Bob T-Shirt and a pair of sweat pants while giving your Powerpoint presentation. There's nothing wrong with a cartoon t-shirt and pair of sweat pants. They are comfortable. Versatile. Affordable. But simply 'say' the wrong thing for a TED talk. When people ...


13

It can be confusing because often times you find out that people use the term "font" openly to refer to many things in typography. Here's a lively discussion on fonts and typefaces. Traditionally, font is a term used when discussing a set of characters of a certain typeface and in the same family. A font has also been used to describe a software used to ...


12

Comic Sans MS scores extremely well in readability, particularly for educational content (like Higgs-Boson announcement): Fortune favors the bold (and the Italicized): Effects of disfluency on educational outcomes Which Fonts Do Children Prefer to Read Online? Only designers really take issue with Comic Sans MS because of how it is designed breaking ...


11

Short answer: "No." Long answer: There are four factors involved in deciding the leading (nowadays meaning the distance from one baseline to the next, also called line height): the x-height of the characters, the measure (length of the line), the weight of the strokes of the characters themselves and the size of the type. In this answer, for simplicity, ...


11

Photoshop is not a web designing program. To get text that looks the same in a browser as in a graphic (jpg, gif etc) you have to use the same font in both programs. Some fonts are not used by all browsers. Depending on the size of your text, a good mid-sized font could be Tahoma, Helvetica, Trebuchet or Georgia. Check out this website for some good ...


11

Pixel fonts aren't terribly different from tiny print fonts when you get right down to it*. The one big exception is that you know what the medium will do with pixel fonts -- a very big advantage. There really isn't an ideal pixel grid, per se. Obviously a larger grid gives you more room to work. The smallest types I've seen work successfully are 7px ...



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