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6

Probably Century font family or a similar one. Also looks like Corona font (http://cdnimg.fonts.net/CatalogImages/23/44530.png)


6

It's definitely out of the Gill Sans family. It's closest to the Bold weight that I have locally. My guess is that there's some kind of manual alteration - it looks like it's horizontally squished a bit, and it could possibly be faux-bolded as well. However, there might be some bolder weight or condensed variant that I'm unaware of. Here's the glyphs I'm ...


5

As a general rule, if an identity program has a specified typeface, you should stick to it in all media. A particular campaign may have its own identity with its own fonts, different from the brand's usual typeface. The reason for this isn't that style guides are binding or executives are stubborn, although both of those can be true, it's that repetition ...


5

A typeface tells a story. Whether or not you're consciously aware of it, it has history, character, emotion. Of course, most people don't realize this. It's subconscious but that makes it all the more powerful as a psychological tool. If your mark is going to be primarily typographic, the message of the typeface becomes a much bigger piece of the ...


5

Can I use the font on the website using the @font-family rule? Depends on the font license. You need to read the license that came with the font file. Like I found on a website like this: font-family: "Century Gothic","Apple Gothic",AppleGothic,"URW Gothic L","Avant Garde",Futura,sans-serif; That's not necessarily using an embedded @font-family. ...


4

AFAIK, answer to both questions is 'yes, go ahead'. A warning, though: don't mix up the css rule font-family with th css technique @font-face. font-family is the first example you give, which will cause the browser to search for the typeface on the visitor's machine and proceeding with the next font when failing. This is also called a 'font stack'. ...


4

Short answer: it's something that previously was largely limited to higher-end print design for practical reasons that is now possible in web design due to modern devices having high pixel density screens. It's popular now because in the web context it's new and so it looks fresh, because it's elegant and clean which fits wider current trends, and because ...


4

If you have the font on your machine to make the letter but didn't pay for it, then installing the font was your infringement. But there is no copyright protection on the shape of letters: Under U.S. law, typefaces and the letter forms or glyphs they comprise are considered to be utilitarian objects whose utility outweighs any merit that may exist in ...


3

When it comes to typeface design and protection of said designs, there are a few angles to consider: the law professional ethics personal ethics We'll forgo personal ethics for now as that is highly debatable depending on one's personal opinion. As for the law...it's...vague and messy, at best. And highly dependent on your region. Wikipedia has a decent ...


3

Because it's a design trend. More specifically because it's an Apple Design trend. iOS7 makes heavy use of Helvetica Neue Light. Why did they choose this? You'd have to ask Apple. Guesses would be that it fits into the 'super simple, less-is-more, flat UI' style they were going with. Plus it shows off their retina screens.


3

Most typefaces are sold as an entire set, so yes, you'd need to purchase the entire typeface. In the grand scheme of things, a typeface shouldn't be a make it or break it part of the budget. It's just yet another tool that you'd be using to produce the final product. All that said, there are alternatives. For instance, House Industries' PhotoLettering ...


3

You could see if one of these suits you: Deco Tech Mouse Deco In general, you're looking for a geometric font. The keyword deco will help you too. As always, with free fonts, make sure you have the proper license to use the font in your setting.


3

OCR-A is not a sans serif face. I'm afraid I have to disagree with the group here. The i, j, l, T, 1, and 7 all use serif elements that can not be present in a sans serif (6 and 9 too, in a weird sort of way). This is a superb example of why we break out monospace as it's own category. Strange deformations become necessary to fill the gaps. Monospace ...


3

In that OCR-A does not have serifs, yes, I can confirm that it is a sans-serif font. In that the letters are not a connected script face, yes, they are considered block letters (block letters being letterforms that aren't connected to others--though the term is a bit fuzzy and may be used in different ways). OCR-A is a rather unique font in that it was ...


3

Very confident it is Clarendon Light based on the width of the letters. Clarendon Light


3

Both Aller and Source Sans Pro have commonalities with Trebuchet MS, in particular the curved tail on the letter l: The fonts are available at fontsquirrel.com. However, only Source Sans Pro is a webfont, Aller is desktop only.


2

The font is close to Thesans Classic or Light or "Hair" TheSans Hair


2

If you need the merged font in Adobe InDesign, you can do it directly from there, and it's quite flexible, as well. Go to Type -> Composite Fonts, in the Composite Fonts Editor you see you can have three different fonts merged into one, one for your original language (Base), one for the English characters (Latin) and then you can choose what font you'd like ...


2

I would say the first font is better for a fashion brand because it is thinner and more angular. These things give it a great feminine distinction and make it more appealing to that audience. It also has the advantage of being bolder and will stand out better when inverted to white against color and will stand off print material well when black.


2

I don't know if you speak Chinese or not, but in case you know what you are doing, you could subset the font and reduce it to the 3000-4000 most used glyphs. This should be enough to render most standard Chinese texts and could significantly reduce the file size (a Chinese font might come with over 20,000 glyphs). Do this only in case you master Chinese at ...


2

It might just be "because they can". Not far back, they would not have worked very well cross-browser/been available. After the possibility of using them, it became a trend. Besides, it is a good thing for smaller and smaller screens with better and better resolutions. Thin fonts can be as striking as bold, it is all about context; in what environment you ...


2

You'll find that it's typically up to the company whose brand you are representing. Some have strict style manuals that must be strictly adhered to, some don't have any kind of identity guidelines, and some have one that the old marketing director commissioned but the new one doesn't really use all that much. You'd be best off asking the client how much it ...


2

The adventure is close (not identical) to Amador - If you want to find free font, try to look for fonts SIMILAR : LTC Goudy Text, Monotype Goudy Text, Octoberfest, Cabazon, Engravers' Old English, Gothique, Old English (these are not free)


2

Fonts don't say anything that specific. At most, they can give off a broad, general vibe. But in terms of saying anything specific, it's going to depend heavily on context. For example Bodoni may say 'classic' in general, and when applied to the cover of Elle it now says something more specific: 'high fashion'. Futura may say 'industrial' in general, ...


2

Is this for a header or for text? Just browsing through Google webfonts I found: For headers maybe something like Ubuntu Condensed, Orbitron, or Titillium Web. For bodies of text maybe Inconsolata, Open Sans Condensed, or Abel I have to agree with Yisela, its hard to tell what you your going for without any examples. At RSA this year there was ...


1

In Acrobat, choose File > Save As Other > Optimized PDF... On the Fonts tab, be sure that "Subset all embedded fonts" is checked. Save the PDF. That will remove all the unused embedded characters, and will substantially reduce the size of the PDF. (As a note, since Calibri is pretty much ubiquitous, you could probably unembed it completely without a ...


1

To clarify, there are two different licenses: desktop and web. If you have the font on your desktop (legally) you can create graphics for your site with it. You can even specify it in your CSS with fall backs so that it displays for those who also have it on their desktop but degrades gracefully for those who don't. When you choose to embed the font on ...


1

There is a better way The old approach to branded web type: A. Render type in images to avoid font availability issues. B. Use a system font that's close but waaaay more clunky. Don't do that. Use web fonts. There are plenty of quality sources. On a budget but still need high quality? Go to Google Fonts. You can even download them for print. Font ...


1

Might be an "UFO (Undefined Frustrating Object)" problem. If any of above suggestions didn't solve your problem you should check 'Text Frame Options' Ctrl(Cmd)+b. Thick the 'Ignore Text Wrap' option. If you gonna make it, means that you have some object (empty frame, background image etc.) with 'Text Wrap' option set to on.


1

One solution might be to check out an external font manager, such as NexusFont, which lets you "enable" fonts as you need them while otherwise keeping them hidden (say you're working on a project that needs a handwritten font - you can enable all the fonts tagged "handwriting", and then they'll appear in your font menus in other programs - then you can ...



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