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24

I think Helvetica's biggest strength (and thus is greatest weakness) is just how "neutral" of a typeface it is. It really can work well in all sorts of situations and applications because of how balanced and neutral it is. But by the same token, it becomes "bland" - the office beige color of typefaces. I would never say Helvetica is superior to any other ...


14

Objectively you've already mostly answered it in your question: neutral In that it's 'plain' and not overly decorated, this is certainly true. Helvetica in a lot of situations doesn't impart any additional meaning (intentional or otherwise) beyond the words it is forming. well-glyphed I'm not sure I've heard that particular term before, but I ...


9

Typefaces become popular for a number of reasons, partly technology (which often drives fashion -- "Because I can" is a more potent driver than most people realize), partly the cultural milieu within which they fit and become associated, partly the mood they invoke (or don't). The grotesks in general arrived on the typographic scene at a time when Western ...


7

I think that this is exact question is answered very well by the documentary on the font that came out in 2007. It has been a while since I have seen it, but the part I remember most goes over how Helvetica became associated with modern design at the time of it's introduction. It talks about many other reasons as well: readability, compactness... This ...


6

A tricky aspect of design is that things which are actually uniform seldom look uniform. Unlike some earlier sans-serif font families which actually had uniform stroke widths, and others which included marked variations in stroke widths, Helvetica is designed to balance varying stroke widths to create a general appearance of uniformity. For example, in ...


5

This question has a lot of answers, so I'll try to be brief. Helvetica is the absolute peak of European (or Swiss) modernism and, as such, it strives for neutrality. As Massimo Vignelli put it: You can write I love you in "Helvetica Extra Light" to be very gentle and romantic, or you can write I love you in "Helvetica Extra Bold" to be intense and ...


2

I work with Chinese-English prints a lot and usually people use separate fonts for Chinese and English. And like Ryan said, if English uses serif fonts, then Chinese uses serif fonts, same for sans-serif. We don't use Chinese font for English text because Chinese font is double byte and often will display latin characters in a monospace manner (unattractive ...


1

In addition to web sites, most font management applications have a feature to allow you to browse fonts in different manners. I happen to use FontAgentProX. It has a "font compare" tab that allows you to highlight fonts (active or not) and see them side by side: I'm sure Suitcase, FontExplorer, et. al. have similar features.


1

In the current version of Inkscape seems not yet possible to embed SVG fonts (see also here a little example). In 0.48 Release Notes: There is a known limitation where the list of glyphs in the dialog are not yet rendered in the selected font, but still in the system font In 0.47 Release Notes there is a more detailed explanation of the limitations: ...


1

I figured out how to export SVG from sketch for icomoon correct importing: Step 1 Prevent SVG from being made out of borders by selecting the path group and clicking on: layer > paths > vectorize stroke To know that this has worked, the strokes where transformed to closed paths and the inspector now displays the fill color instead of the border color. ...


1

According to Typekit help, you're only allowed to serve fonts on your client's website if you are on a business plan, and page views of that plan start at 2M. It also suggests that you could set up a Typekit account for each client, as you proposed. Personally, I would go for the second option, avoiding to absorb a recurring cost that depends on customer ...


1

There's 2 official answers from the SIL site (that maintains and documents the SIL/OFL licence): Is subsetting a web font considered modification? Web Fonts and Reserved Font Names The summary (at least as I unserstand it) is: you are allowed to convert into WOFF format while keeping the reserved font name, as long as you dont subset. Other formats or ...



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