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7

Ideally all collateral material is designed, formatted, and created by those that know design and would therefore have the brand fonts installed. Just because a piece is not "exciting" or visually important, such as a contract, it doesn't mean a designer should avoid it. A well designed, branded contract carries a solid message with it. Forms which ...


6

While you can just add an outline, that is not the preferred way to do it. The preferred way is: set the type (and convert to outlines if need be) give the type an outline twice the thickness you want duplicate this type (so it makes a copy directly on top) set this duplicate type to not have any border, and whatever fill color you want The reason for ...


5

The massive 150-page Design Guidelines I worked on used a variant of option 2. There was a section in the Guidelines about PowerPoint, which stated that branded, designed templates existed (with company logo, colors, and layout) and were to be used, but within those templates, standard system fonts (Arial and Times, probably) were used in place of the ...


5

To add to DA01's excellent answer and to provide additional context, OpenType comes in two flavors: TrueType and PostScript. So way back in the day, when Adobe created PostScript, they defined curves in a certain way mathematically. PostScript became wildly popular because it could accurately take things on screen and print them onto paper and it could ...


4

I haven’t tested this, but I this should be possible with contextual chaining substitutions. You roughly need to do the following (the details probably depend on the program you are using), taking the alternation between vertical and horizontal as an example: Make your default letters vertical. Create a single-substitution feature that replaces each ...


4

What specific advantages or disadvantages can be found in the various font formats in today's technological setting?? As you stated, today's main advantage is with OpenType being able to support a much larger set of glyphs as well as other things like alternate characters and automatic character swapping. Should I be avoiding Type 1 and Type 3 ...


4

When you justify text rather than leaving it left-aligned, InDesign has only so many ways to adjust things so that the right margin lines up. By default, it does this by adjusting the spaces between words. In this case, you are using a very large point size in relation to the width of the line, which forces InDesign to make a wide space between the only two ...


4

[As far as I know] There is no name for such fonts, because there are too few of them to create a categorization. As mentioned in the comments, square or perhaps geometric could be possible search terms. Your best option is to look for perfectly square uppercase fonts, as these are easier to find. Here is a font with lowercase and a close-enough ...


3

Just add an outline to the font, or, better still do it in illustrator and create an outline.


2

There are a number of good answers already for why Comic Sans might be inappropriate, but all of them rely to varying degrees on some implied knowledge of culture, suggesting the appropriateness (or lack thereof) as defined by the existence of other articles... which I'm guessing doesn't quite answer your original question. It looks like you're looking for a ...


2

It's rather unfortunate that Illustrator took so long to do font previewing the same way its sister programs did. However you can still preview fonts in Illustrator (CS5) by going to Type -> Font. Though the other unfortunate thing is that it seems as though you can't actually scroll with your mouse, you have to click to scroll. In the past I've ...


2

There is not much overlap in fonts except for core web fonts (Arial, Georgia, Verdana, Tahoma, Times New Roman, Courier, Comic Sans, Trebuchet). I think a more important question is which fonts you really NEED, are there acceptable susbstitutions, or what is the cost of replacing those. I doubt you need to have all fonts. List of fonts installed with OSX ...


2

Comfortaa is a pretty close / similar alternative, if you don't mind the rounded ends, and it's free/open source. It's Comfortaa Regular in the example


1

You can try WhatTheFont. It searches similar fonts by image. Modulus Medium DyeLine Medium Ardeco 3 Harry Plain Not a perfect match but I wouldn't tell the difference.


1

You can also contact the designer directly: http://www.dafont.com/profile.php?user=397384 You do need an account.


1

Add this after your piece of CSS and before the closing semi-colon: !important So: body { font-family: 'Syncopate', sans-serif!important; } This will bazooka through any other style settings (unless they also use !important). Also, remember that: http://fonts.googleapis.com/css?family=Syncopate' rel='stylesheet' type='text/css'> should be: ...


1

Photoshop & Browser both are different so it is possible in text size. i also have this problem so i Google it and find http://pxtoem.com You can see it how font size work and which font size you can use for your text.


1

I can't recommend a font but I would consider fonts that were available up to the 1850s, or at most up to the beginning of the 20th C. So, maybe some modern romans. I don't really see the Arts and Crafts movement working that well for today's audience but ... it might. The UX guy in me says - know your audience.


1

Gentium from SIL will likely work well for a free font. The SIL Open Font license also means that you can edit the font for your own needs using a font editor like FontForge. Gentium was designed for scholarly work and supports Latin, Cyrillic, and Greek.


1

As Unicode has strived to replace all the existing standards with some success, I would recommend using it. I have worked and maintained a font using Unicode for some time and am not aware of any issues that arise from this. With everything else, I would not be surprised if you run into compatibility issues. There is a lot, which isn’t covered by ISO-8859-1 ...


1

In Illustrator CC, they added the ability to preview fonts in the drop down menu of the Type tool, in which you couldn't see a preview in earlier versions, just the font names. In previous versions however, you can see a preview of the fonts by going into Type > Fonts. It's not a very convenient menu though, as it's not very easy to scroll or find the fonts ...


1

A Gothic typeface is not at all anything like medieval lettering. It actually comes from grotesk, or grotesque which began around 1900. It's basically a synonym for sans-serif and it a movement that originated in the Scandinavian area and widely applied by the bauhaus. Hence Akzidenz-Grotesk, and hence Century Gothic.. and pretty much any typeface with that ...



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