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As KMSTR says, you don't. Impact does not have an italic variant, nor a bold, for that matter. Many consumer-based software like Microsoft Office allow so-called faux bold and italic for all fonts installed: if a separate font file for these alternate styles is not installed, the software simply slants the characters (for faux italic) or makes them thicker ...


2

I work with Chinese-English prints a lot and usually people use separate fonts for Chinese and English. And like Ryan said, if English uses serif fonts, then Chinese uses serif fonts, same for sans-serif. We don't use Chinese font for English text because Chinese font is double byte and often will display latin characters in a monospace manner (unattractive ...


2

I think the reality is you can do it either way. I would certainly try to use a font up front that supports English and Chinese, if that failed though I wouldn't lose any sleep over selecting a different font for the Chinese version. Just try to keep the overall feel the same between the two. If you use a simple sans-serif English font then try to find a ...


1

According to Typekit help, you're only allowed to serve fonts on your client's website if you are on a business plan, and page views of that plan start at 2M. It also suggests that you could set up a Typekit account for each client, as you proposed. Personally, I would go for the second option, avoiding to absorb a recurring cost that depends on customer ...


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There's 2 official answers from the SIL site (that maintains and documents the SIL/OFL licence): Is subsetting a web font considered modification? Web Fonts and Reserved Font Names The summary (at least as I unserstand it) is: you are allowed to convert into WOFF format while keeping the reserved font name, as long as you dont subset. Other formats or ...



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