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15

You may find this answer slightly off-topic, but let's look at what the case mixing means in that particular example rather than in general. To get some context, it's helpful to look at the other varieties of peanut butter offered by this brand. In this context, I think it's clear that each design is trying to convey something about the product's ...


11

That would be Caslon540 I believe Caslon on WIKI, there are more than 65 variants of Caslon Typeface.


8

Although I couldn't find the previous question, Identifont managed to identify it within four questions. It's the italic form of FF Cocon:


7

Found it, I think! It's Lucida Sans.


7

Every font should come with a EULA (End User License Agreement) that will outline what you can and can not do with the font. In most every case, you having purchased a license for a font grants you the right to use the font for typesetting any work you are creating. In some cases, there may be some exceptions. Some common exceptions: some fonts don't ...


7

Can I just point out that the use of a combination of both have a long history? They are half-uncials) They were rather common in days of yore. You can see them for example in these kind of fonts: I know of places where people write capital R in a regular handwriting, otherwise consisting of lowercase. This I found in Ireland particularly, and maybe that ...


6

Short answer: it's something that previously was largely limited to higher-end print design for practical reasons that is now possible in web design due to modern devices having high pixel density screens. It's popular now because in the web context it's new and so it looks fresh, because it's elegant and clean which fits wider current trends, and because ...


6

I found a post on Typophile looking for the same thing: I am trying to identify the font used on many car odometers. The closest I've come is eurostile and microgramma but neither match the seven and the corners are more angular. Any help would be appreciated. The two fonts that the author lists are great candidates if you're not as picky: Neither ...


6

Some notes on possible improvements: The page uses eight different typefaces, and variation in font size and different content color and background color combinations. That makes a rather messy impression. Using two or three typefaces should normally be enough. Legibility is suboptimal. White text on dark background is less legile, and white text on light ...


6

All the images seem to come from the same source mostly GearedBull (Jim Hood) user on Wikipedia. It is a type specimen although quite smalll compared to standard specimens. To me, it just looks like someone took the time to make these images for Wikipedia. I doubt you could easily edit the file since the font is probably in outlines but you can gather some ...


6

P22 has a font mirrored after these type of toy blocks called Toy Box Blocks: http://www.myfonts.com/fonts/p22/toybox-blocks/


6

Sarah Script from LetterheadFonts.com


6

There are actually a handful of different weights for Open Sans. This is most likely the Open Sans Light 300.


6

This is wildly opinion-based, but I would go for number two; hands down. The proportions are better, the sharpness of the M an As less spiky. Besides.. the top one reminds me a little too much of Futura, and though it is a good font, it is a little dated. At least to me.


6

A typeface tells a story. Whether or not you're consciously aware of it, it has history, character, emotion. Of course, most people don't realize this. It's subconscious but that makes it all the more powerful as a psychological tool. If your mark is going to be primarily typographic, the message of the typeface becomes a much bigger piece of the ...


6

It's definitely out of the Gill Sans family. It's closest to the Bold weight that I have locally. My guess is that there's some kind of manual alteration - it looks like it's horizontally squished a bit, and it could possibly be faux-bolded as well. However, there might be some bolder weight or condensed variant that I'm unaware of. Here's the glyphs I'm ...


6

Probably Century font family or a similar one. Also looks like Corona font (http://cdnimg.fonts.net/CatalogImages/23/44530.png)


6

This is trivial to do using TeX/LaTeX (though you'll want to use a newer version such as xetex or luatex so as to be able to easily access OpenType and TrueType fonts): \documentclass{standalone} \usepackage{fontspec} \setmainfont{Myriad Pro Black Condensed}% <<-- change to desired font \usepackage[nomessages]{fp} \makeatletter ...


5

The word CAPITAL is probably written using font 'Eurostile'


5

It's a DIN font, possibly Light; maybe regular. The R is doctored, and the A most easily rendered with an inverted V. Such customisations for logos are not uncommon. http://www.myfonts.com/fonts/fontfont/ff-din/pro-light/ There are a huge number of proprietary variants of DIN fonts. Your version may be slightly rounded (the vertical parts of O don't look ...


5

This could be a good time to introduce scripting and the script listener to your tool set. While a plugin is fine you might have some other ideas later where this might help. So here is my quickly clobbered together script. To use this change the setup part and put this in a jsx file (and then drag an drop on Photoshop for instance): // setup preferences ...


5

Identifont pulled through for me! This typeface is Aller by Dalton Maag. It's available there, Font Squirrel, and in other places as well, I'm sure.


5

Just use a font I'd say no. That's not a logo, that's simply a line of type set using a font anyone can use. There's nothing identifying or unique about it. That is not a logo in my opinion. Companies which use a typeface designed logo actually design the type. It's rare you'll ever see a company use some typeface which is straight from someone ...


5

As a general guideline, you can't reason someone out of a decision they didn't reason their way into. If Comic Sans gives him the fuzzy-wuzzies because it looks cozy and friendly, you have to point out the emotional impact it has on his clients/vendors. (That is, it makes him look like he's running his shop out of his basement.) As far as tactics go, try ...


5

One good way to get this type of design, is to get your self a big sheet of paper (A1) and a big square nibbed marker (1cm width or more), then draw out the letters with your whole arm - not wrist. This enables you to be free and fluid with your letters. Once you have a few variations, then take a piccy with your phone, then load into Illustrator and get ...


5

Probably you'll like TELE MARINES FONT


5

This can happen when the type is used at sizes not supported in the hinting. It's essentially a display error. When you print it's gone. Even exporting to PNG or jpeg will fix it in some cases. Other than that, the only fix is more complete hinting.


5

There is a better way The old approach to branded web type: A. Render type in images to avoid font availability issues. B. Use a system font that's close but waaaay more clunky. Don't do that. Use web fonts. There are plenty of quality sources. On a budget but still need high quality? Go to Google Fonts. You can even download them for print. Font ...


5

Notice on the tooltip that pathfinder minus says "minus front". It can subtract many things from one thing - out of everything you have in a selection the one thing in the back is what it subtracts everything that's in front of it. When I say "one thing", groups don't count. When you expanded the text you got a group, and expand text puts the first letter ...


4

If the copyright details aren't shown in the Font previewer... then you may be able to find it using the File Properties themselves (right-click in Explorer and choose Properties). Unfortunately (at least in Windows 7) the properties aren't selectable. For this version of the font I found, the copyright data is COPYRIGHT (c) 1992-95, C-DAC, PUNE, ...



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