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113

At its core, There isn't really anything wrong with Comic Sans. It was designed for a purpose - comic-book-style speech bubbles primarily. It did a good job at that - if you're going to have Microsoft Bob talk to you on a screen, Comic Sans feels more 'right' than Times New Roman. Three things have contributed to Comic Sans' unpopularity, in my view. ...


93

There are technical, compatibility, legal, authenticity, and subjective reasons for not using it. I'm going to go through each in turn listing out the reasons with examples and references. Starting with: Hitler freaks out over Comic Sans Technical Reasons There are a handful of purely technical reasons not to use it. The first, was a lack of italic ...


32

Comic Sans is a poorly made font because it succeeds neither at resembling actual comic book handwriting, nor printed lettering. For comparison, here is a well designed comic book font called Crimefighter BB. The above example is italicized and all caps, so while a great font for comics, it is not exactly all-purpose. But there are plenty of other great ...


28

Fonts like this are called glyphic serif. But since for example Optima is widely considered a sans serif, I don’t think it would be wrong to say the same for Marcellus. By the way: The German font classification system (DIN 16518) considers fonts like this to be Antiqua-Variants. Antiqua-fonts that can’t be classified clearly as serif or sans-serif go in ...


25

I think Helvetica's biggest strength (and thus is greatest weakness) is just how "neutral" of a typeface it is. It really can work well in all sorts of situations and applications because of how balanced and neutral it is. But by the same token, it becomes "bland" - the office beige color of typefaces. I would never say Helvetica is superior to any other ...


19

How you write is like how you dress. It's not about practicality, it's about how you present yourself. It reflects how much thought and effort you put into your appearance. It strongly influences your audience's first impression before you even open your mouth, and it colors what you have to say throughout the presentation. In this metaphor, Futura would be ...


15

You may find this answer slightly off-topic, but let's look at what the case mixing means in that particular example rather than in general. To get some context, it's helpful to look at the other varieties of peanut butter offered by this brand. In this context, I think it's clear that each design is trying to convey something about the product's ...


15

There's nothing wrong using Comic Sans when it's appropriate: for comics (duh), informal publications, and applications targeted towards children. It's meant to have both legible and handwritten attributes. Here are two completely legitimate examples: Since it's a font that comes packaged with Windows and the majority of users don't download or install ...


15

Objectively you've already mostly answered it in your question: neutral In that it's 'plain' and not overly decorated, this is certainly true. Helvetica in a lot of situations doesn't impart any additional meaning (intentional or otherwise) beyond the words it is forming. well-glyphed I'm not sure I've heard that particular term before, but I ...


12

Using Comic Sans in your Powerpoint presentation at a TED Talk is the equivalent of wearing a Sponge Bob T-Shirt and a pair of sweat pants while giving your Powerpoint presentation. There's nothing wrong with a cartoon t-shirt and pair of sweat pants. They are comfortable. Versatile. Affordable. But simply 'say' the wrong thing for a TED talk. When people ...


12

Typefaces become popular for a number of reasons, partly technology (which often drives fashion -- "Because I can" is a more potent driver than most people realize), partly the cultural milieu within which they fit and become associated, partly the mood they invoke (or don't). The grotesks in general arrived on the typographic scene at a time when Western ...


11

That would be Caslon540 I believe Caslon on WIKI, there are more than 65 variants of Caslon Typeface.


10

A typeface tells a story. Whether or not you're consciously aware of it, it has history, character, emotion. Of course, most people don't realize this. It's subconscious but that makes it all the more powerful as a psychological tool. If your mark is going to be primarily typographic, the message of the typeface becomes a much bigger piece of the ...


9

Comic Sans MS scores extremely well in readability, particularly for educational content (like Higgs-Boson announcement): Fortune favors the bold (and the Italicized): Effects of disfluency on educational outcomes Which Fonts Do Children Prefer to Read Online? Only designers really take issue with Comic Sans MS because of how it is designed breaking ...


8

This is wildly opinion-based, but I would go for number two; hands down. The proportions are better, the sharpness of the M an As less spiky. Besides.. the top one reminds me a little too much of Futura, and though it is a good font, it is a little dated. At least to me.


8

As KMSTR says, you don't. Impact does not have an italic variant, nor a bold, for that matter. Many consumer-based software like Microsoft Office allow so-called faux bold and italic for all fonts installed: if a separate font file for these alternate styles is not installed, the software simply slants the characters (for faux italic) or makes them thicker ...


7

Every font should come with a EULA (End User License Agreement) that will outline what you can and can not do with the font. In most every case, you having purchased a license for a font grants you the right to use the font for typesetting any work you are creating. In some cases, there may be some exceptions. Some common exceptions: some fonts don't ...


7

Can I just point out that the use of a combination of both have a long history? They are half-uncials) They were rather common in days of yore. You can see them for example in these kind of fonts: I know of places where people write capital R in a regular handwriting, otherwise consisting of lowercase. This I found in Ireland particularly, and maybe that ...


7

There are two anwsers I can think of. First: it's not about being good or bad per se. Black text on dark blue background for example is bad because it's hard if not impossible to read. Comic Sans is not unreadable (as other answers have explained, it actually scores quite well on readability). What it is: overused. The same goes for the default powerpoint ...


7

I think that this is exact question is answered very well by the documentary on the font that came out in 2007. It has been a while since I have seen it, but the part I remember most goes over how Helvetica became associated with modern design at the time of it's introduction. It talks about many other reasons as well: readability, compactness... This ...


6

Short answer: it's something that previously was largely limited to higher-end print design for practical reasons that is now possible in web design due to modern devices having high pixel density screens. It's popular now because in the web context it's new and so it looks fresh, because it's elegant and clean which fits wider current trends, and because ...


6

All the images seem to come from the same source mostly GearedBull (Jim Hood) user on Wikipedia. It is a type specimen although quite smalll compared to standard specimens. To me, it just looks like someone took the time to make these images for Wikipedia. I doubt you could easily edit the file since the font is probably in outlines but you can gather some ...


6

It's definitely out of the Gill Sans family. It's closest to the Bold weight that I have locally. My guess is that there's some kind of manual alteration - it looks like it's horizontally squished a bit, and it could possibly be faux-bolded as well. However, there might be some bolder weight or condensed variant that I'm unaware of. Here's the glyphs I'm ...


6

Probably Century font family or a similar one. Also looks like Corona font (http://cdnimg.fonts.net/CatalogImages/23/44530.png)


6

This is trivial to do using TeX/LaTeX (though you'll want to use a newer version such as xetex or luatex so as to be able to easily access OpenType and TrueType fonts): \documentclass{standalone} \usepackage{fontspec} \setmainfont{Myriad Pro Black Condensed}% <<-- change to desired font \usepackage[nomessages]{fp} \makeatletter ...


6

Unlike in Gimp or other applications there is a strict separation of font family vs. font style in SVG, and in Inkscape. Therefore we will be presented the font family only from selection in the top panel. To change the font style (as they were defined with the installed font) we can either use the default style icons from the tool panel, or adjust it using ...


6

When I'm in the audience, a presentation in Comic Sans just makes me feel like like the presenter is thinking I'm stupid, like I'm at the wrong place. It's like being talked to in Simple English. Imagine attending a talk on Haskell and the presenter starts with "We want to write letters on our computer that tell our computer what to do." — it's just ...


6

A tricky aspect of design is that things which are actually uniform seldom look uniform. Unlike some earlier sans-serif font families which actually had uniform stroke widths, and others which included marked variations in stroke widths, Helvetica is designed to balance varying stroke widths to create a general appearance of uniformity. For example, in ...


5

The word CAPITAL is probably written using font 'Eurostile'


5

It's a DIN font, possibly Light; maybe regular. The R is doctored, and the A most easily rendered with an inverted V. Such customisations for logos are not uncommon. http://www.myfonts.com/fonts/fontfont/ff-din/pro-light/ There are a huge number of proprietary variants of DIN fonts. Your version may be slightly rounded (the vertical parts of O don't look ...



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