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50

johnp already mentioned using an automated font identification tool might prove troublesome without a rendered sample, but you could always just make your own rendered sample. It doesn't have to be perfect since the auto-identifiers build in some tolerance to broaden the search. Luckily, your glyphs are easy enough to create: WhatTheFont returns a few ...


23

In plotters, it's called a "stroke font", "single line font", "engraving font", "technical lettering font", or just "plotter font". A plotter strokes images onto paper using a pen. It cannot fill images except by repeatedly stroking them less than a pen-width apart. So fonts designed for use with plotters will contain glyphs with one stroke ("simplex"), two ...


23

If you are looking for a font which specific features, I would recommend using font identification apps/sites based on the traits you have in mind. In your case, it would be helpful to upload your final logotype to online ID sites to find something similar. Identifont is a useful tool to find a typeface based on some questions on a font's anatomy. Using ...


16

It is called subpixel rendering, or subpixel anti aliasing. Microsoft does something similar for most windows applications. Your screen consists of colors that are next to each other. If you do a simple sample based anti aliasing you do not get the best possible result. But by leveraging of the knowledge of how the pixels are laid out you can get better ...


11

There is no official or standardized answer to this, but many of the big players have undertaken mostly-independent efforts to extend or replace existing type specifications to include color, and it looks like many of those efforts are because of emoji support. Some of these companies' specifications, while not accepted as standard, have already been ...


10

Most engineering applications support fonts with just lines and user supplies thickness. As do quite many engraving and milling machines. Some fonts exist though they wont work very well in modern software (if at all). This is the problem: The font engines have regressed since we deprecated PostScript. Sorry no easy solutions. So one could have all kinds of ...


10

Out of curiosity, I looked up what Wikipedia has to say about fonts: In metal typesetting, a font is a particular size, weight and style of a typeface. Each font was a matched set of type, one piece (called a "sort") for each glyph, and a typeface comprised a range of fonts that shared an overall design. In modern usage, with the advent of digital ...


9

That is Officina Sans. Designed by Erik Spiekermann and distributed by ITC. Quite popular in the late 90s.


8

Metafont is a description language used to define vector fonts. Unlike more common outline font formats (such as TrueType or PostScript Type 1), a Metafont font is primarily made up of strokes with finite-width "pens", along with filled regions. Thus, rather than describing the outline of the glyph directly, a Metafont file describes the pen paths. What ...


7

That's Voltage by Laura Worthington.


7

Is it normal practice to use two different fonts for print material and email? Yes. Actually, it's normal practice do not specify any font in email. Email is text and not everyone wants HTML formatted email. And most people don't want to have to download a font just to view their email--especially on a mobile network.


7

A quick search for "fonts that come in serif and sans-serif format" returned this website: Superfamily Font Roundup: 40+ Serif and Sans Font Pairings Reading what he wrote states: There isn't a clearly standardized name for serif/sans-serif paired families, but from what I can find, superfamily is the term most commonly used. You may also find ...


7

You can trademark a logo. And a logo can be made from a typeface. It's less protectable than something custom, but protectable none-the-less. But parody is a perfectly acceptable. I'd find a new printer.


7

The linked font contains the "normal" glyphs as uppercase letters and mirrored copies as lowercase.


6

Note that most of the following is nothing but an educated guess. I do not know what actually motivated the Typeplate scale If you mulitply 18 repeatedly with ∛2 ≈ 1.26 you get the following sequence which, when rounded to “standard” font sizes yields the Typeplate scale with some exceptions: 18.0 → 18 22.7 → 21 28.6 → 24 – This is out of place, 28 would ...


6

This is called subpixel rendering. The different colours are only visible because the image has been blown up. It will be easier to give an example of white on black. Imagine a one pixel thick white line. On most desktop LCD screens the individual subpixels colours are arranged horizontally. As long as all three colour pixels are turned on we will see a ...


6

Gill Sans Nova is an remaster of the existing Gill Sans typeface from Monotype. Known improvements of Gill Sans Nova compared to Gill Sans (MT): Expands the Gill Sans family from 18 to 43 fonts (including weights that haven't been digitized before and new weights drawn by George Ryan). OpenType features such as experimental characters from historic ...


6

tldr; woff covers almost everything. At time of writing, adding ttf also covers approximately 1% of global users on old stock Android browsers, and adding eof also covers approximately 1% of global users on IE8. svg is probably no longer necessary, but do add a non-web-font fallback font because browsers not supporting any web fonts are probably at 5% ...


6

There's no hard rule to this. There are plenty of examples of brands that don't adhere to this. 3M comes to mind where their logo is based on Helvetica, which is also one of their corporate typefaces. The reasons to consider making it a 'rule' could include: preventing the logo brand from being 'watered down' by over-use of the typeface elsewhere. ...


6

Another term for what you're looking for is a "stick font" - there's a free set of 9 of them that I've used for CNC and laser engraving at http://www.mrrace.com/CamBam_Fonts/ Note that these fonts tend to look bad onscreen, with enclosed areas often appearing solid. This is because they are technically invalid outline fonts: each character necessarily ...


6

A font is either: a file format containing glyphs (such as opentype) a set of physical glyphs that (typically) share the same style (such as a set of wood type, lead type, or photolettering) As such: In Illustrator if I type the letter "A" it is certainly a font. Well, no. Not usually. In most cases, it would be typing a glyph from a font, but the ...


6

If you would like to try a decent FREE font exchange go to http://www.dafont.com/. You can type in the actual letters you want to see in the fonts they have listed. They have it grouped very well and it may take a few minutes but I think you'll find what you want, be able to download and install quickly and be on your way. Try the "Techno" section first. ...


6

Sounds a bit like a chicken and egg conundrum! Is Google following trends, or creating them? The most likely answer is: Both (Google is a Schrödinger chicken!). I think the gist of it is the issue of brand identity and consistency vs change. The concept of a brand is that it should remain unchanged over its life - to communicate the continuity of its ...


6

This is called a ligature. The tend to be very subtle, like the ones used for te ff, fi and ffl combinations. This one is... less so. You can deactivate ligatures (all of them) using -webkit-font-variant-ligatures: no-common-ligatures;, but that will also get rid of the (useful) other ligatures. You might want to check out this StackOverflow question on ...


6

Typically a font’s small caps are designed to rise up to somewhere around the font’s x-height (or a little higher). Regular capitals rise to the full cap-height. For example, in Adobe Caslon: Sometimes the small capitals are just scaled down versions of the capital glyphs, but on a well-considered and complete typeface (like in Adobe Caslon above, or in ...


5

On linux you can go to https://github.com/google/woff2 and compile that, then you'll have two utilities, one for compressing fonts to woff2 format and the other to decompress woff2 fonts to ttf.


5

This is drawing heavily from The Memphis Group's design motifs. They became shorthand for the 80s, due to the rather bizarre level of market acceptance they received during that period. For something slightly less gaudy, also look at Constructivism and De Stijl.


5

A good practice is simply saving the ready-to-print type-outlined file as the same name with something like _outlined added to it. That way you can always revert back to the non-outlined version to make easy changes or find out the font name


5

The difference is that Consolas has hinting and your font does not. Pure vector graphics do not scale all too well in small size brackets (sic). small lines may become smeared across two pixels for no good reasons. To combat this scaling problem fonts implement a technique called hinting Essentially, if we simplify things a bit, hinting is a specially ...


5

If you are using Photoshop cc it's not too hard to replicate. Find a font that is similar like Intro Inline. Add gradient Add one inside thin strokes for the first oultine (#fdf49c) This stroke wont fully fill in the inner line so you'll have to make a new layer and fill with brush. Create warped text and apply arc. Duplicate the Font and place under the ...



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