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15

You may find this answer slightly off-topic, but let's look at what the case mixing means in that particular example rather than in general. To get some context, it's helpful to look at the other varieties of peanut butter offered by this brand. In this context, I think it's clear that each design is trying to convey something about the product's ...


11

That would be Caslon540 I believe Caslon on WIKI, there are more than 65 variants of Caslon Typeface.


9

So, I didn't found the exact same font, but I think this is the most similar-looking fonts you can get: For the upper part I would also go with Bell and for the lower part: Legothic URW Light I would post an images, but I signed on a few days ago, so I'm not allowed to..


8

A typical principle for font pairing is contrast. If there's a sans-serif in the header, using a serif for the body copy is a great way to provide contrast. However, I don't think that principle applies here. The typeface in question is so funky, so quirky, and has so much style that it would probably benefit from a cousing that's a lot more simply drawn. ...


8

Although I couldn't find the previous question, Identifont managed to identify it within four questions. It's the italic form of FF Cocon:


7

Found it, I think! It's Lucida Sans.


7

Every font should come with a EULA (End User License Agreement) that will outline what you can and can not do with the font. In most every case, you having purchased a license for a font grants you the right to use the font for typesetting any work you are creating. In some cases, there may be some exceptions. Some common exceptions: some fonts don't ...


7

Can I just point out that the use of a combination of both have a long history? They are half-uncials) They were rather common in days of yore. You can see them for example in these kind of fonts: I know of places where people write capital R in a regular handwriting, otherwise consisting of lowercase. This I found in Ireland particularly, and maybe that ...


6

I found a post on Typophile looking for the same thing: I am trying to identify the font used on many car odometers. The closest I've come is eurostile and microgramma but neither match the seven and the corners are more angular. Any help would be appreciated. The two fonts that the author lists are great candidates if you're not as picky: Neither ...


6

Short answer: it's something that previously was largely limited to higher-end print design for practical reasons that is now possible in web design due to modern devices having high pixel density screens. It's popular now because in the web context it's new and so it looks fresh, because it's elegant and clean which fits wider current trends, and because ...


6

It's Mission Script designed by James T. Edmondson for LostType: http://www.losttype.com/font/?name=mission_script


6

All the images seem to come from the same source mostly GearedBull (Jim Hood) user on Wikipedia. It is a type specimen although quite smalll compared to standard specimens. To me, it just looks like someone took the time to make these images for Wikipedia. I doubt you could easily edit the file since the font is probably in outlines but you can gather some ...


6

Coda looks very similar to me, however it is much more vertically condensed. If you un-scrunch it, it looks much more similar: Try it out


6

P22 has a font mirrored after these type of toy blocks called Toy Box Blocks: http://www.myfonts.com/fonts/p22/toybox-blocks/


6

Sarah Script from LetterheadFonts.com


6

There are actually a handful of different weights for Open Sans. This is most likely the Open Sans Light 300.


6

This is wildly opinion-based, but I would go for number two; hands down. The proportions are better, the sharpness of the M an As less spiky. Besides.. the top one reminds me a little too much of Futura, and though it is a good font, it is a little dated. At least to me.


6

A typeface tells a story. Whether or not you're consciously aware of it, it has history, character, emotion. Of course, most people don't realize this. It's subconscious but that makes it all the more powerful as a psychological tool. If your mark is going to be primarily typographic, the message of the typeface becomes a much bigger piece of the ...


6

It's definitely out of the Gill Sans family. It's closest to the Bold weight that I have locally. My guess is that there's some kind of manual alteration - it looks like it's horizontally squished a bit, and it could possibly be faux-bolded as well. However, there might be some bolder weight or condensed variant that I'm unaware of. Here's the glyphs I'm ...


6

Probably Century font family or a similar one. Also looks like Corona font (http://cdnimg.fonts.net/CatalogImages/23/44530.png)


6

This is trivial to do using TeX/LaTeX (though you'll want to use a newer version such as xetex or luatex so as to be able to easily access OpenType and TrueType fonts): \documentclass{standalone} \usepackage{fontspec} \setmainfont{Myriad Pro Black Condensed}% <<-- change to desired font \usepackage[nomessages]{fp} \makeatletter ...


5

The sans-serif font is League Gothic. Here it's overlaid on the image given: The tracking is a bit off but it's clear that the glyphs are a match. As mentioned previously, the other font is Pacifico. Both are freely available for commercial use on Font Squirrel.


5

Someone is welcome to prove me wrong as this is not authoritative, but I believe that it's a custom job. Here's why: The 'o' glyphs are different. That rules out most basic free fonts and indicates either custom or a more recent OpenType font. The second 'o' glyph is slightly larger than the first and moves upward just a bit. This fits with the current ...


5

I'd go with either a grotesque or geometric sans. Lots of other possibilities exist but these are some good categories with lots of solid, reliable options. Both commercial and free web fonts exist that will solve your dilemma. Paid Akzidenz Grotesk (nevermind, it's not available for web) FF Bau Univers Helvetica Neue (because ...


5

The word CAPITAL is probably written using font 'Eurostile'


5

Some notes on possible improvements: The page uses eight different typefaces, and variation in font size and different content color and background color combinations. That makes a rather messy impression. Using two or three typefaces should normally be enough. Legibility is suboptimal. White text on dark background is less legile, and white text on light ...


5

It's a DIN font, possibly Light; maybe regular. The R is doctored, and the A most easily rendered with an inverted V. Such customisations for logos are not uncommon. http://www.myfonts.com/fonts/fontfont/ff-din/pro-light/ There are a huge number of proprietary variants of DIN fonts. Your version may be slightly rounded (the vertical parts of O don't look ...


5

This could be a good time to introduce scripting and the script listener to your tool set. While a plugin is fine you might have some other ideas later where this might help. So here is my quickly clobbered together script. To use this change the setup part and put this in a jsx file (and then drag an drop on Photoshop for instance): // setup preferences ...


5

That's just plain and simple Arial and Arial bold. A handy tool to indentify fonts is WhatTheFont.


5

Identifont pulled through for me! This typeface is Aller by Dalton Maag. It's available there, Font Squirrel, and in other places as well, I'm sure.



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