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It all depends on the project. The best way to choose fonts is to find ones that visually support the project. Fonts for lingerie would be different than fonts for a heavy equipment manufacturer.


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How best to emphasize a portion of your paper? All printers can easily reproduce grey text. The issue with grey text is that of sufficient contrast to be legible and easily readable. Legibility will be an issue where symbols are used. Mathematic is heavy with problematic situations.Here's where you should look for them Superscripts Subscripts Limits (the ...


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Is it OK to use gray font for the parts of math proofs I remove but retain? Not sure how a graphic designer could answer this. If somebody print my PDF, will gray fonts work well with all modern printers? Yes, generally speaking if you have enough contrast a printer will be fine printing gray colors. Also which RGB value do you suggest for "...


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Unless you have the original Gimp file with the text still as a text layer, no you can't. Identifying a font from a raster image is complex and well beyond the scope of Gimp's feature set. There are online services that can help with font identification from an image, such as What The Font. You can also ask here on GD.SE, but make sure you ask a good ...


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This is the closest I could find Download here


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It looks like it might be a skewed/smooshed Univers Black (with a custom t).


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It looks like Austin Ultra from Commercial Type.


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Glad you like my font. Message me and I'll just sent it to you, no charge.


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I know this is an old question but I figured that as a programmer I might be able to offer up some advice. I use FreeMono on all of my text editors and IDEs. It looks quite similar to Courier New and has better support for Unicode.


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http://www.blambot.com/ has some great free and pay hand written fonts mainly used for comics and the like.


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I agree with @AndrewH your request is pretty ambiguous, however there are some cursive fonts for free available here https://www.fontshop.com/people/fontshop-team/fontlists/free-fonts


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It totally depends on the product and audience. If you're advertising a security company, you would use a strong, bold, no-nonsense font. For lingerie, you'd use a feminine, elegant font. In other words, research and find a font whose look and feel matches the message.


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Unfortunately Apple aren't too concerned with Windows users. They expect everyone who is designing for Mac to use a Mac. And since the San Francisco font has been created with specific features only available for Mac it is only available on Mac and unlikely to be available on Windows any time soon (unless someone decides to hack it, which is a possibility). ...


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This appears to be a Helvetica Derivation. The closest Google Web font to Novencento would be Monteserrat. https://www.google.com/fonts/specimen/Montserrat


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Are there particular font qualities that are used in sales advertising No. There are particular font qualities that are often used to sell particular products and services, however. But that doesn't mean you have to use the same ones.


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There is no one "right" font in advertising materials, though there are some general guidelines for making media more readable. Print: Use ornamental fonts for big titles only, sans serif fonts for headers and captions, and serif fonts for large bodies of text (ie a paragraph description). Serif fonts are good for this purpose because the little "tails," ...


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I found this answer and it helped me fix the embedded missing font problem. https://helpx.adobe.com/acrobat/using/correcting-problem-areas-preflight-tool.html


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Without knowing more about the content of the site, I could see three paths: If the website contain large blocks of educational text, I would look for Legibility and ease of reading Clean lines (free of distraction and emphasizing simplicity) Friendly rather than intimidating One of the more commonly used sans serif fonts would fit the bill here. If ...


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From what I can understand, your asking what style of font best characterises the 'ideal' educational institution - respected, safe, knowledgeable. This is a very personal question as the subject of fonts is a very subjective one with many personal responses pertaining to the context of exposure to various graphical triggers. Personally, in educational ...


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It probably has to do with the way you're importing/exporting them. Try exporting them with a transparent rectangle as a background. That way they'll all have the same base size.


2

Font files (well, most types of font files) don't contain any color information...which makes sense as the designer is the one that has to choose the color. For creating fonts that ultimately will be nice to have rendered in multiple colors, the typical solution is to separate the parts you want as different colors and put them into separate glyphs. The ...


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It may be a strange workaround but you could input you font to this program and export it as a bitmap, then adapt your work. I used it myself for a website that could only display bitmaps inside buttons.


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A typeface with a large x-height (the relative size of lowercase vs. uppercase letters) may have one typeface 'look' bigger than the other. Moreover, and no less common, point size is hardly a measure for actual glyph size. Verdana uppercase is larger than Garamond uppercase, for example. Some typefaces have ridiculously small letters for their point sizes. ...


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If you put your images next to the word 'content' written in the thorowgood font you can clearly see this is the same font, the creator just played around with the height and width of the font.


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The vertical alignment of a plus sign and minus sign will be consistent (obviously I can't say for certain for all fonts, but generally). What you are using there (I assume), and the key on your keyboard is actually a hyphen or hyphen-minus. The vertical alignment of hyphens and dashes are often not the same as the alignment for a minus sign, which will be ...


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I tried WhatTheFont with no luck but I knew I recognised the font so I had a look through some fonts I had recently been looking through and here it is: Prangs Black by Sudtipos


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The alternative characters (or glyphs) will be controlled by specific OpenType features. Most likely either ligatures, stylistic alternates or contextual alternates. How you control the use of these features will depend on the software you are using your font with. For example, in Illustrator you can control which features are used in your text through the ...


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Good answer above, I can also recommend Typewolf.com, which suggests complementary font combos and shows examples of them in action.


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convert every page to jpeg and put this image in the indesign file then convert the file to pdf with my best wishes


2

If you are confident that you have selected a font that you have installed on the machine, you may have a font style selected that isn't available. For example, I see that the style you have set is "Normal", but it may need to be "Regular". This can happen usually when you switch from one font to another and the assigned style isn't present in the new font.


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You can make a portable SVG file by converting the text to a vector path. Select the text object, then go to the menu Path → Object to Path. (You could also use Stroke to Path, depending upon what you want to do). Of course as a vector, the text will no longer b be editable as text, but that may not matter as much to you as being able to have your SVG ...


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See also Glyphtracer: Glyphtracer takes an image of letters. It detects all letter forms and allows the user to tag them. They are then vectorised and passed on to Fontforge for fine tuning. https://launchpad.net/glyphtracer


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As far as I know there is no easy way to compare all aspects of corporate designs of multiple companies in one place. (If I understood your question correctly). I suggest you use Trello. This is a free online tool, really simple to use. It consists of cards arranged in tables (you define number of tables and cards on each one, as well as their order) where ...


2

Adobe TypeKit uses @font-face to define the fonts. It actually uses Javascript to dynamically link the correct fonts using the best method for the browser and OS in question and fires custom Javascript events when your fonts are loaded for example, but the actual fonts themselves are eventually loaded in the same way as you would load your own custom web-...


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For ligatures to be supported in an OpenType font, two things need to be there: the actual ligature glyphs (which you can check by scrolling through the glyph table with a symbol picker etc.) and a glyph substitution table that tells software to replace a sequence of characters by a ligature. There’s a handy piece of software called DTL OTMaster Light (free,...



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