New answers tagged

2

I'm sorry for answering super late, I've just noticed your mention. I'm the author of the article you link to. There is definitely more than one "professional" way of handling several resolutions, and things have become a bit more mature since I wrote about it. If you've bumped your resolution to 144ppi, you can fix the zoom and size issues by doubling your ...


3

Different width spaces kind of defeats the whole point of a monospaced font so I doubt there are many. It would be easier to either: Edit the width of the spaces of an existing font in a font editor. FontForge is a free open source font editor. Change the word-spacing setting of whatever software you are using (most design software or word processors will ...


1

WhatTheFont can help you with this :) (image to font) https://www.myfonts.com/WhatTheFont/ Best result for your image: https://www.myfonts.com/fonts/font-fabric/code-pro/


0

but I've never seen any research backing that up There is little-to-no conclusive research on what fonts are more legible than others. There is some evidence that people read best what they are used to reading. And there is some evidence that on low-resolution screens, the less details, the better. But beyond that, don't put too much weight into ...


0

The correct answer is actually Phosphate RR Solid. Here's one of the many sources to find this font http://www.azfonts.net/load_font/phosphatesolid.html


1

Tambor by CastleType seems to be the closest match. It doesn't have the slanted S but shares similar characteristics as Bremen Bold while keeping a similar stroke throughout. Tambor Medium Tambor Bold


7

The linked font contains the "normal" glyphs as uppercase letters and mirrored copies as lowercase.


0

There are several software's that allow you to create fonts. Popular ones include: FontLab, Fontforge and Glyphs. If you want to get started right away, without spending too much money, there is a free book available online, which guides you through the font design process with FontForge. You might find it useful as a starting point. The book is available ...


0

If you are using a proprietary font then please check the EULA agreement that accompanies the font. Most proprietary fonts do not allow disassembly/modification of the font and this is usually mentioned in the EULA. So I'm afraid that this might not be possible. If you use a Libre (open source) font then you would have no problems doing this. So, it really ...


3

Generally speaking, you should install fonts on your OS, not a specific program. You can make your fonts available to Illustrator without installing them on your OS though. From Illustrator Help / Fonts: In addition to the fonts installed on your system, you can also create the following folders and use fonts installed in them: Windows Program ...


-2

Yes, you can use atleast 2 different font family to any corporate designs. I myself working as UX Designer, here they have a brand guidelines and have two font families, Helvetica Neue and Arial. While creating some thing for emailer we user Helvetica for image texts and headings and for main content we use Arial.


0

Most corporate style guides, if well considered, will employ two or more typefaces. If a skilled designer has been responsible for the production of the brand and accompanying style guide, the fonts should be, at the very least, complementary to one another. If well considered, there shouldn't be any conflict between the different typefaces. It may be that ...


0

Arimo is like a more Grotesk version of Eurostile by my judgement https://www.google.com/fonts/specimen/Arimo


3

I've rounded down some alternatives: Jura Titillium Esphimere Exo Exo 2 Enigmatic Aero Matics (Especially the Light version)


1

Today I learnt about a new tool, which "was made just for your question". It was published in 2011 but I am sharing it here, less than one hour after I tested it: http://blog.tavultesoft.com/2011/07/character-identifier-tool.html Hope this helps, it is an .exe so will probably need Windows.


2

Univers is owned and licensed by Linotype (the LT in the font name). It is not free. You can probably find it as a free download somewhere but you will be using it without a license. There are a number of versions of Univers (the one you have there is Linotype Univers), none of which are free.


1

The Univers LT STD Roman fonts are not free fonts. On www.fontsup.com free font downloads database there are 27 Univers LT STD Roman fonts listed and all of the fonts show a message in red letters that says: Font has been removed by request of copyright owner.


0

I think Zamenhof Solid is right. It looks like they altered it slightly by stretching the letterforms vertically, and yes, you're right, the letter-spacing is very close. But I think it's definitely Zamenhof: the angle of the terminals is very distinctive, and characters like the G are quite distinctive and match Zamenhof Solid.


1

Typeface vs. Font. The first term focusses on the design, the second refers to the files you use, but the terms are often simply used interchangeably. Your legal questions. There are no general answers for this. Each font (even the free ones from Google Fonts for example) come with a license and you need to check that license to see what you are allowed to ...


1

It's free to use. You can just add this to your HTML page: <link href='https://fonts.googleapis.com/css?family=Open+Sans' rel='stylesheet' type='text/css'> And then in your CSS: p { font-family: 'Open Sans', sans-serif; }


3

A list of fonts that support the Unicode Currency Symbols Block, which contains currency symbols not part of more general blocks (i.e. Basic Latin that contains $ or Latin-1 that contains £) can be found here: Font Support for Unicode Block 'Currency Symbols' A list of all unicode currency symbols can be seen here—from which you can see which blocks ...


1

Its better to use ASCII or Unicode, because this fonts or character are already built-in in most of the operating systems that we have today and it has a standard so you don't have problem rendering them in most software you are using. Unicode is a way that a user can insert special characters on a computer and we are doing it even in applications like ...


3

It's sensible to use characters, not a font. What if the font doesn't work somewhere? This caught my grandmother out when she wrote her book. She used a font for hebrew characters, and this font didn't print out - so some random letters were used instead. Instead, you should use the unicode characters. This page has them all, and a selection are below: ...


1

Being myself a graphic designer with some background (a BSc) in psych, my take is that typography has always associated with human cognition, with or without the awareness of the designer/typographer who designs the font or any piece that involves typography. Cognition involves things such as recognition, i.e. how to recongise shapes, associate them and ...


0

A typeface is an idea — an original creative thought that carries with it descriptors and traits. It can only be described, though, until you find a way to manifest it. Draw it on paper, render it in wood or metal, and nowadays, create a digital version. Now it's a font. A typeface is the creative idea. A font is the manifestation thereof. (Same with a ...


0

Generally speaking, 16px is standard. It is recommended by Typecast, Smashing Magazine (ironically the article now uses ~20px font size for my device), UX.SE, most common browsers, and many other sources. 16px corresponds with 12pt font in most books read at the same distance. Each of the links here are good reads on the subject if you want to read more ...


5

Font Squirrel lists fonts that it hosts itself (Local) and fonts only available for download from external sites (Offsite). You can use the filter you describe to view only fonts hosted by Font Squirrel, only fonts available for download from an external site or all fonts. If you are viewing all fonts you can see if a font is only available for download ...


2

It depends which Gotham weight you'll be using and also are you using the 6pt size for body text or smaller copy (eg. footnotes, etc)? Gotham Book which is the "regular" weight should work in 6pt but you can also consider going up to 8pt for body text. It is generally a matter of personal choice and it all depends on your volume of text, experience with the ...


0

I tried Libre Baskerville and increased the font spacing to 1px and I feel it is fairly close. https://www.google.com/fonts/specimen/Libre+Baskerville



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