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1

To clarify, there are two different licenses: desktop and web. If you have the font on your desktop (legally) you can create graphics for your site with it. You can even specify it in your CSS with fall backs so that it displays for those who also have it on their desktop but degrades gracefully for those who don't. When you choose to embed the font on ...


0

Although I understand everyone's thoughts of going with the second version, I would not. Engravers Gothic is too widely used in luxury brand identities (Marc Jacobs, Acqua de Parma – to name a few)…thereby making it less unique. If you would like your brand to stand out among the rest, I would go with number 1.


7

It's legal to ask the browser to use Helvetica Neue if it's available on the system, but you'd need a license if you want to serve the font yourself. One option is to use Helvetica Neue if it's system-installed and fall back to some other sans-serif font like Arial if it's not.


2

You may consider alternatives to the Helvetica Neue, like the ones listed here http://theultralinx.com/2013/03/5-google-web-font-alternatives-helvetica-arial.html


0

In the future, give this tool a shot (http://www.myfonts.com/WhatTheFont/) it's been helpful time and time again for font matching. I would say it's more-or-less 90% accurate.


6

This font is commercial property and is not allowed to use without proper licensing for usage. Linotype licensing


4

This font called Cuprum. It is available for free from Google fonts


0

I've observed that the free/libre Sawasdee font, while far from a clone, has similar features. Here's a comparison of Sawasdee Bold versus Trebuchet MS regular:


0

Alan perfectly explained the norm for well executed branding. Consistency is king when is comes to hammering a brand into the public's mind. Beyond simple reinforcement by repetition, a consistent face/voice/experience gives the impression of stability and trustworthiness. But there's a loophole You can also be consistent with variety. For instance, if ...


3

Both Aller and Source Sans Pro have commonalities with Trebuchet MS, in particular the curved tail on the letter l: The fonts are available at fontsquirrel.com. However, only Source Sans Pro is a webfont, Aller is desktop only.


1

There is a better way The old approach to branded web type: A. Render type in images to avoid font availability issues. B. Use a system font that's close but waaaay more clunky. Don't do that. Use web fonts. There are plenty of quality sources. On a budget but still need high quality? Go to Google Fonts. You can even download them for print. Font ...


5

As a general rule, if an identity program has a specified typeface, you should stick to it in all media. A particular campaign may have its own identity with its own fonts, different from the brand's usual typeface. The reason for this isn't that style guides are binding or executives are stubborn, although both of those can be true, it's that repetition ...


2

You'll find that it's typically up to the company whose brand you are representing. Some have strict style manuals that must be strictly adhered to, some don't have any kind of identity guidelines, and some have one that the old marketing director commissioned but the new one doesn't really use all that much. You'd be best off asking the client how much it ...


1

on a Mac, open your terminal and type: strings /path/to/your.pdf | grep -i fontname


1

Might be an "UFO (Undefined Frustrating Object)" problem. If any of above suggestions didn't solve your problem you should check 'Text Frame Options' Ctrl(Cmd)+b. Thick the 'Ignore Text Wrap' option. If you gonna make it, means that you have some object (empty frame, background image etc.) with 'Text Wrap' option set to on.


0

If simply changing the font fixes your problem, it's a metrics problem associated with that font alone. A few things may be causing this: Corrupted font file. Try wiping and reinstalling a fresh copy. If you created this font yourself, you might even try a fresh export. Corrupted InDesign doc. Create a fresh doc and try it there (probably not news to you). ...


-1

See if you have superscript accidentally selected. I've had this issue before.


3

OCR-A is not a sans serif face. I'm afraid I have to disagree with the group here. The i, j, l, T, 1, and 7 all use serif elements that can not be present in a sans serif (6 and 9 too, in a weird sort of way). This is a superb example of why we break out monospace as it's own category. Strange deformations become necessary to fill the gaps. Monospace ...


1

While I agree with the others that this font could be considered sans-serif, I would classify it as a monospaced font first and a sans-serif font second.


0

100% sans serif. Serifs are those little "feet" at the ends of certain lines. Serif means "with serifs" and sans serif "without serifs". Serif fonts are for example Times New Roman or Cambria. Sans serif fonts are for example Arial, Helvetica or Calibri. You will spot the difference easily.


3

In that OCR-A does not have serifs, yes, I can confirm that it is a sans-serif font. In that the letters are not a connected script face, yes, they are considered block letters (block letters being letterforms that aren't connected to others--though the term is a bit fuzzy and may be used in different ways). OCR-A is a rather unique font in that it was ...


4

I sort of fixed it by changing the display method in Photoshop. I had anti aliasing method set to 'crisp' I changed it 'sharp' (or vice versa) and it cleaned it up.


3

Very confident it is Clarendon Light based on the width of the letters. Clarendon Light


0

Looks very similar to Guarda Sans Regular or a vertically stretched variant of Soleto Regular.


6

Probably Century font family or a similar one. Also looks like Corona font (http://cdnimg.fonts.net/CatalogImages/23/44530.png)


0

It's worth mentioning using a web font, self served or hosted. If it is in the budget or technical capabilities of the client, a web-font will ensure the exact font is rendered on modern browsers. There's a good chance you already have less-than-modern browser fallback styles, and that would be the only other variants you need to worry about, in which ...


1

One solution might be to check out an external font manager, such as NexusFont, which lets you "enable" fonts as you need them while otherwise keeping them hidden (say you're working on a project that needs a handwritten font - you can enable all the fonts tagged "handwriting", and then they'll appear in your font menus in other programs - then you can ...


-1

If helps, here you have all the Font Awesome icons made in vector shapes for Photoshop: FontAwesome vector icon shapes


5

This can happen when the type is used at sizes not supported in the hinting. It's essentially a display error. When you print it's gone. Even exporting to PNG or jpeg will fix it in some cases. Other than that, the only fix is more complete hinting.


1

I found a pretty complete write up here: http://grandzebu.net/informatique/codbar-en/ean13.htm explains: how to generate checksum digit (and supplies a VB program to do it), and includes an Excel macro & EAN-13 TTF font w/ installer


1

Museo Slab Looks to be the 900 weight as well.


1

This may be a silly suggestion, and forgive me if it is. But why not - if you plan on using the font solely for images - create the shapes yourself? That way, you can't go cheaper. note: I am not suggesting to obtain/clone it, simply mimic it in actual beliers curves.


4

Try Fiesta Font: Not identical, but free and close.


3

You could see if one of these suits you: Deco Tech Mouse Deco In general, you're looking for a geometric font. The keyword deco will help you too. As always, with free fonts, make sure you have the proper license to use the font in your setting.


3

Romeo Condense Medium, on myfont.com http://www.myfonts.com/fonts/fontbureau/romeo/mediumcondensed/


1

Mixing Serif and Sans-Serif, in my opinion, works in a web context, but looks a bit off in this case. I don't feel you need to use different fonts for the titles, the chapter name looks nice because it's serif and it's readable, and mainly because it just looks consistent with the rest of the text. The sans-serifs in the subsections work inversely, they ...


1

I haven't seen any fonts that are nearly identical to that one, but here's one that is close: http://www.dafont.com/steinantik.font Others to consider: http://www.dafont.com/carolus-roman.font http://www.dafont.com/roman-sd.font


2

Here's the full logo. The three words seem to be in the same font (regular and bold). The "GM" part is close to Gill Sans Bold but the letters are a little rounder ("C").


1

Flaticon offers icon fonts for web usage. See if this helps you... http://www.flaticon.com/


6

It's definitely out of the Gill Sans family. It's closest to the Bold weight that I have locally. My guess is that there's some kind of manual alteration - it looks like it's horizontally squished a bit, and it could possibly be faux-bolded as well. However, there might be some bolder weight or condensed variant that I'm unaware of. Here's the glyphs I'm ...


1

Closest match I could find after a lengthy search for "sans-serif bold" is Granby Elephant Pro. The G is quite particular in this one, I thought it would be easier to locate. Your sample is not Granby, but it has a similar G:


2

If you need the merged font in Adobe InDesign, you can do it directly from there, and it's quite flexible, as well. Go to Type -> Composite Fonts, in the Composite Fonts Editor you see you can have three different fonts merged into one, one for your original language (Base), one for the English characters (Latin) and then you can choose what font you'd like ...


11

That would be Caslon540 I believe Caslon on WIKI, there are more than 65 variants of Caslon Typeface.


4

Looks like Pradell, image linked below, found via identifont


5

A typeface tells a story. Whether or not you're consciously aware of it, it has history, character, emotion. Of course, most people don't realize this. It's subconscious but that makes it all the more powerful as a psychological tool. If your mark is going to be primarily typographic, the message of the typeface becomes a much bigger piece of the ...


0

I like the first one, it has more of a classic feel and the "PARIS" just looks like luxury. The second ones horizontal scale seems too wide, especially in the A and S.


2

I would say the first font is better for a fashion brand because it is thinner and more angular. These things give it a great feminine distinction and make it more appealing to that audience. It also has the advantage of being bolder and will stand out better when inverted to white against color and will stand off print material well when black.


6

This is wildly opinion-based, but I would go for number two; hands down. The proportions are better, the sharpness of the M an As less spiky. Besides.. the top one reminds me a little too much of Futura, and though it is a good font, it is a little dated. At least to me.


0

Cooperatively, the problem was: "Did you try sorting the font list differently (i.e. toggle "friendly font names")? Adobe Garamond is under "G" in these cases." – horatio "I am not sure how to toggle friendly font names, but most of them are in friendly format already. However, this is the issue, and Illustrator is putting these 2 fonts in their own ...


5

Can I use the font on the website using the @font-family rule? Depends on the font license. You need to read the license that came with the font file. Like I found on a website like this: font-family: "Century Gothic","Apple Gothic",AppleGothic,"URW Gothic L","Avant Garde",Futura,sans-serif; That's not necessarily using an embedded @font-family. ...



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