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0

It looks like it could be FF Wunderlich OT - the C is what makes me think this.


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Ok, I'll answer as a font designer: I think you need to have the font designed or design it to meet your requirements. In the image you are submitting of what you're looking for, the lowercase "g" and "y" (etc) are not typographically "correct", meaning, they do not respect typographical conventions for lowercase letters and are not pleasing to the eye of ...


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Unicode Characters are chosen by those that are submitted to the Unicode Technical Committee. Usually the submissions are characters that are already being used. Most of the cat characters that exist now were emoji characters, used by many japanese phone carriers before being included in unicode. These emoji are very focused on japanese culture, including ...


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Looks a lot like Daniel Bold to me. On second look, I'm almost sure it is.


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Here's what you should do: Scan your work, one glyph per file - from here on the instructions are for each glyph separately. Very important for making fonts - ach glyph is a file of it's own Open them in illustrator and convert your glyph to an svg, either by using live trace or tracing it manually (recommended) Notice that the glyphs must be a ...


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Oh, there are ways. Here are some options in order asc from shitty and easy, to less shitty and hard. Rely entirely on this one article and make sure to always use serif or sans-serif as the final font in your list. Check out the OS font stack for OSX on wikipedia. Google around for type specimens for those fonts, and trust that it looks ok in your usage. ...


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Under Preferences, set up a grid with gridlines every 10px with 10 subdivisions: Then, you can turn on View → Show Grid and View → Snap To Grid and all drawing actions will snap to the pixel grid. With everything set up, when you draw or edit, it will be snapped to the pixel grid. This results in nice sharp lines, even with pixel preview on. Strokes ...


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If you have Acrobat Pro, you can run a Fix-up on the pdf to convert the color space to CMYK. When you set-up your Fix-up there is a checkbox to Preserve Black Objects that will convert black text to 100%K.


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open up a RGB .pdf you want to convert File > Document Color Mode > CMYK converts your RGB pallete to CMYK Swatches pannel > Add Used Colors adds every color swatch your document uses file swatches used in document are now present in your swatches panel select the color swatch you want to convert to 100%K, be sure to set 'Global' checkbox active this ...


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Another much easier solution is: don't use latex in Matlab 2014b to label your axis. For example, you cannot have any thing like x_1^*. If you use only plain text in Matlab, then when you save the file to svg, the text will be kept. You can then edit the .pdf_tex file generated by Inkscape to show the correct label. This is of course due to the bug of the ...


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Can't say it's perfect, as the "S" and "C" are slightly different... but otherwise, Avenir Next is verrrrrry close. Top is Avenir Next Medium, bottom is Avenir Next Bold. EDIT: Now that I look closer, the "B" is different also. But if you can't find the actual font, this might be a decent 2nd choice.


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Prasanth, as far as I can see you have found the only place to buy the font (MyFonts.com, a great resource, does not list it). On the fonts.com website it is available – as you stated - only in post-script format. The font seems to be from 1997 (you can find it at the identifont-website) so maybe they (Monotype/Linotype originally) did not put out any other ...


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I would check out Typekit: Script fonts with low contrast I would also check out the medium contrast fonts. Also check out Designmodo article: Script Fonts: Most Popular Typefaces, Best for Webfonts. Note that these fonts can also be used for desktop. Some of the notable script fonts that have even strokes from the article. Thirsty Script Aphrodite Pro ...


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Some background on me, so you can estimate how much or little authority I have: My native language (German) uses diacritics (ÄÖÜäöü) as well as non-diacritical special characters (ß) and is in the process of introducing or rejecting a new special character (ẞ, the capital eszett) right now. I did some research on the diacritical characters myself for the ...


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I would try 2 things. 1) Turn OFF the smooth line art option, see if the problem persists. I would then turn this option back on Acrobat / Preferences / Page Display / 2) Export in another PDF setting, change the Acrobat version to anything above 4 when exporting from Indesign or Illustrator. Note: The only downside is that it makes your document no ...


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I think it can be done much easier. In Illustrator open the GLYPHS panel, on the canvas make a empyt text field, set the font of that text field to the icon font and that dubble click on an icon in the GLYPHS panel.


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Some of your question is better directed to a legal professional as all license/legal questions require legal opinions (and thus they are not a good question for the Graphic Design StackExchange). The most practical means of meeting the CC-Attribution-No Derivatives requirements is to provide a noticeable area in your work that attributes the creator of ...



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