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23

Why should someone pay for your designs? Because you have talent, knowledge, invested time and you create something someone else can't. The same is true for type designers and their product. They don't give away their quality product for free because the invested a lot. The quality of most free (gratis) fonts is very low. Imagine doing a identity for a ...


23

To scoop up all suggestions in the comments and add my own reasons, here goes: Quality Paid fonts are higher in quality, on average than free ones. Remember that saying: 'Pay peanuts, and you get monkeys'? It applies to fonts as well. Paid fonts most probably have more features than free ones, just like most other software. Examples are lowercase; ...


19

It depends what kind of images you are designing. For vector work: Inkscape For non-vector design and/or photo-editing: GIMP or Paint.NET (less advanced, but still very capable)


18

Google font directory https://www.google.com/fonts The fonts are free (as in beer and as in speech). Most of them are using the SIL Open Font License, but not all of them.


12

Short answer: you should use the typeface that is right for the job. Maybe that's a free font. Maybe it's not. Longer answer: Disadvantages of (many, not all) free fonts: limited character set limited weights and styles they tend to be over-used and can dilute your brand image because of that limited range of variety Advantages of (many, not all) ...


11

Fonts included with Linux distros are usually Open Source. This would include these major families: Liberation Bitstream Vera Nimbus DejaVu The Wikipedia page Free software Unicode typefaces list many others. Additionally, another well-known Open Source font is the Ubuntu font, now used as the default sans font in the 10.10 release of the operating ...


9

All images - everything you see - is copyrighted. Google images is not a viable search method for images to reuse. If you want to reuse images, especially those of known origin, such as Garfield, you must contact the creator and ask permission. Often permission comes with a fee.


8

but I know nothing about those licenses You have to read them. :) But yes, those are but two examples of licenses that often allow you to freely use them. GPL is an open source license. Creative Commons is not, and will have different stipulations based on the type of license. Crediting in source code wouldn't typically meet the needs of licenses ...


7

For a hand drawing one giving tons of control over stroke settings, and evolving, is MyPaint . Scribus , a layout/publishing tool, is told to be one of the very few supporting well CMYK. Indeed, some people do their design in Inkscape, and export to Scribus, so they do there the cmyk stuff, etc. And believe it or not, I have used Blender from time to time as ...


7

The Liberation fonts are GPL-licensed and designed to be compatible with the most common fonts shipped in Windows: https://www.redhat.com/promo/fonts/


6

Scott is partially correct. All images are, by default, copyrighted in the United States--a) unless otherwise noted or b) the copyright has expired. There's lots of exceptions. Lese mentioned one, Creative Commons licensing. One can also put something in the public domain, or open source it. Copyrights also expire, though the media industry in the US is ...


6

If you need a small number of barcodes, and have some time but no budget, it's simple to produce vector-based barcodes using an online barcode generator and Illustrator (or whatever your tool of choice is). For example, http://www.barcoding.com/upc/ will produce an EAN-13 barcode for you for free. The cool thing about their images is that they are snapped ...


6

I don't know much about barcodes, but I don't think this code is conducive to a typeface solution, because there seems to be an algorithmic process for creating the barcode. from wikipedia: To encode an EAN-13 barcode, the digits are first split into 3 groups, the first digit, the first group of 6 and the last group of 6. The first group of six is ...


6

P22 has a font mirrored after these type of toy blocks called Toy Box Blocks: http://www.myfonts.com/fonts/p22/toybox-blocks/


5

Simon, here's a bit of radical advice: don't ever ask anyone to do anything "for free." Ask, rather, if they're willing to help a good cause for something other than monetary compensation. There has to be some kind of fair exchange involved, otherwise at least one of the parties involved ends up feeling sleazy, and the other feeling ripped off. There are ...


4

Girlfriend has a TV show on a volunteer based TV Channel. We have had a friend do the logo for free, as for him it was also good publicity (name in credits) and looked good in his portfolio. If we needed more work, where could we ask? The show is volunteer based and and a media outlet. You could probably find someone to do graphic design ...


4

There is no appropriate approach. Clients that convinced you to work for free aren't the kind of clients that have any interest in paying you. Go find new clients.


4

I don't have any additional aggregate sources beyond what has already been mentioned, but you might want to check out GUST's TeX Gyre fonts: http://www.gust.org.pl/projects/e-foundry/tex-gyre/


4

I thoroughly recommend this website: http://hellohappy.org/beautiful-web-type/. There aren't so many combinations but they showcase them in such an inspirational way. All the fonts are available free for commercial use from the brilliant Google Font Directory. If you want to try your own combinations out to see what you like (as that's the most important ...


4

This isn't exactly the answer you're looking for, but here are a few thoughts: Hoefler & Frere-Jones are pretty much the cream of the typographic crop. They sent an e-mail awhile back that showed some really great font pairings (with their fonts, of course), but at the top there's a good rule listed: ...all built around H&FJ's Highly Scientific ...


4

Try Fiesta Font: Not identical, but free and close.


3

DA01 is correct; there's almost no way to transition gracefully and resentment-free from pro bono to paid with the same clients. Possibly if you made a big splash about starting your own company, with a suite of stationery and a website and a literal shingle outside your door, and used that as a way to say that you can no longer afford to do volunteer work ...


3

Adobe just released Source Sans. It has a lot of promise. And you'll note that it's hosted on Sourceforge, where by searching for font or typeface I found a handful of other projects.


3

"Where is the right place to ask for people to do free graphics work?" There is no one simple response to this. It's as much to do with the project as it is to do with locale. Consider: colleges and schools that offer courses in the skillset you require. You mention placing ads at the art college - that's a good idea. make sure any materials or efforts ...


3

I've never designed a font, so I'll just say that Oleksandr's recommendation of Font Forge fits with what I've heard. Inkscape supports exporting laying out of images for export to Font Forge, so can be considered part of a font design toolchain. Something nice about using free software font design tools is that they can make use of Raph Levien's ...


3

The basic technique is to create a background color or gradient, add a 50% Grey layer above it with its blend mode set to "Overlay" and add some noise to that layer using whatever method your program provides. In Photoshop it's a filter, and I seem to recall it's much the same in the gimp. Adjust the amount of noise (which should be monochromatic) and ...


3

Select the Move Tool. In the Control Bar across the top of the screen, tick the "Show Transform handles" box.



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