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34

This is a bit of an opinion-based question, but I still think there's value in it. Also somewhat belongs on Freelance.SE, but may fit here as well. To be honest, the most difficult part of freelancing is sticking to your guns during negotiations. This is compounded if you financially need the work. The best option is often to simply stick to your price ...


31

I assume you are asking how much you should charge to design a business card. The answer to that is: your hourly rate * the number of hours it takes you to complete the job The key is to figure out your hourly rate. That is: annual revenue $ / # BILLABLE hours you work per year Your annual revenue is all the money you need to bring in to cover all ...


24

Depends on your contract. In general, absolutely, yes. You did the work, you provided it to the client, now their job is to pay you. I would not offer a discount (seriously, 50 variations?) but would keep it in mind for negotiation if needed. Given that you did so many variations, I would probably offer a 20% discount at most, but only if they were ...


17

If you lower your prices, don't forget to lower your service. As @Scott says, rates are set for a reason. If a client asks us for a cheaper deal, we say "yes" and then we re-propose the project with some features or aspects removed. We then make the client aware that we've achieved a cheaper price by reducing features or proposing a slightly ...


14

On the point of contests in general, on top of what Farray's said I'll just add, do the maths: $490 prize for one person out of 1,109 entrants? Assuming all designs took just two hours on average and people keep at it as long as it takes until they finally win something, that'd give the designers participating in this system an average wage of 22 cents an ...


10

It's probably time to hang up a shingle and promote yourself as a freelancer, at least for the time being. Acquent is one good place to start. Make yourself a fantastic-looking business card, carry everywhere and give out freely. Although you can always poke around for pro bono work for local charitable or religious organizations, these aren't the best for ...


10

You need a Creative Brief. The graphic designer you approach should have one to give to you. Here are a number of topics to consider, though this is for large projects and some of the subjects may not apply for you: Project Background Who are you and what do we need to know about you? Give some background information on how this project came about. ...


10

Well, it is hard to say specifically, because such conditions need to be negotiated before the work, not after project dismissed or finished. But, for sure, you can protect all intellectual property you did and client can't use any of your ideas or sketches without payment. So, you can try to negotiate sell of your concepts, otherwise notify to complete ...


9

I think most clients will assume price is negotiable and try to lower it ;) Something you can do is offer more than one option per project. This doesn't work in every case, but I've done it a few times and results were good. You make two or three proposals based on features, starting with the most basic one and going up to a super-complete-pack. You list ...


8

Round 1: Hey John Doe, I need some (object) made by (date). Its to promote (product, event or service). I can offer (dollars). Are you interested? Or you might wait to see if they're interested and then negotiate that last point but it still belongs in Round 1. Round 2: Great! Here's my (logo / branding) and the (copy). As you see in the branding we ...


8

I would highly recommend taking a look at the AIGA Standard Form of Agreement for Design Services. It is a very extensive agreement that somewhat favors the designer, so if you want to know how to cover your butt, this is probably the definitive document to read. I have read it many times over, and I don't see very much in there that is superfluous to even ...


7

That sounds a little strange to me. If I have a plumber or an electrician give me an estimate for a job, I don't provide them with a contract stating the work to be done and the terms on which I'm going to pay them. I assume that the professional is going to give me a contract detailing the work s/he is going to do. That's why I hire a professional: I assume ...


7

It's like swimming... you have to just jump in the water and learn as you go. You will get taken advantage of. You will get clients that fail to pay you. You will come across clients that argue about pricing, some to great degrees. You will get projects that grow well beyond what was explained to you. You will have clients that want to design for you and ...


7

You are asking graphic designers about this, and the general consensus is likely to be be: How can i earn money through online as a web designer? You can, in theory, but online only is extremely tricky. Only by working hard, creating and finding a client base, building a portfolio will you have a chance. And it is in fact extremely hard to do design ...


7

Try to make a working timeline and specify price for every step your design goes through: sketching process, variations, meetings, discussions, final design. So the client can follow the process. Vnovak gave the most efficient answer for now. Also respect for your clients is the basement for success. Your main purpose is to understand their desires and as a ...


7

I have worked with PowerPoint files as well, but I have also prepared just backgrounds when requested, so it really depends on what they asked and what you agreed on. Perhaps something in between would be ideal, YOU create the backgrounds, but YOU also add them to a PP file along the styles for titles, lists and so on. Regarding the contract, a question ...


6

I can't speak for the differences between working at a larger firm vs freelance, but here are things that I typically specify: Product Definition What constitutes a final product? Who will own the final product? Assets Do we need any assets from the client to do our work? When must the client deliver the necessary assets? What happens if the client ...


6

I've joined several of them already You've joined several already and haven't made any money ... that should be your first giant "red flag" about the "contest" process as a source of income. I can tell that my designs are really good At the end of the day, if you're designing as a source of income, it doesn't matter if you think your designs are ...


6

The only advice I can give is what was given to me when I first started freelancing: Start high. It's far easier to lower your rate on a project then it is to raise it. As for what you're considering charging? It sounds far too low to me.


6

Farray and DA01 have pretty much nailed the key points. My nickel's worth (inflation, don't y'know) speaks to the freelance vs. large firm part of the question. Larger firms tend to deal with larger clients, and should already have carefully-crafted boilerplate to cover the legalities. The sums involved and potential liabilities are often large, so the ...


6

Should designers put ALL of their works in their portfolio? My answer is NO. A portfolio is a collection of your best work. Not EVERYTHING you've done since kindergarten. However, I DO feel that a portfolio should be tailored for who you are showing it to just like a resume. If you are presenting to a client that wants you to do their website, then ...


6

You never communicate that price is negotiable. Sorry. Its bad sales and marketing strategy. Rule #1 Never speak first. If they like your work then they'll either pay the rate or start negotiations and see how flexible you are. You can and should outline what the rate is for. In a bid you would say that this rate is for this exact work. That gives you ...


6

Yes, It is totally legitimate. It's usually the second question I ask after whats the project about. "What kind of budget are we dealing with?" This can give you a general idea if it falls in your realm and worth your time. Generally over email or phone. I usually prefer phone a call, you can hear about the project, budget and get a feel for the ...


6

Is it okay to offer services for such a low value? For who? For the people hiring? It's more than OK. It's ideal. They're getting work for next to nothing. For you? Can you live off of such a low wage? Likely not. Note that sites like 99designs are even worse in that you aren't even guaranteed any money for the work you do. General rule of thumb: ...


5

The common practice around these parts is to add 20%, but there is no standard amount. Having said that, I don't ever mark something up; it just goes straight through to the client. I like it better when I'm being compensated solely for design work, and I've never felt comfortable marking stuff up. Perhaps that stems from having spent too much time at the ...


5

Pen and Paper When freelancing and before many options came out program wise I would always implement the pen and paper concept. The process I chose was to create a graph style list that focused on the task, importance, priority level, difficulty, estimated time to complete task and date completed. When I complete a paper checklist I try to measure my ...


5

Definite No. It is tough to know where to draw the line though, particularly if you have a lot of pieces that you look at as similar quality. You should ask peers what is your best work(s), but more importantly, what is/are the worst. If you get a consistent answer for that, you are hurting yourself, even if it does establish diversity/range. I think the ...


5

In reality, as a designer freelancing, my hourly rates are really unimportant beyond what I need to cover any overhead. Truth be told if I stuck strictly to the standard (overhead + 20% profit) I'd be barely surviving. I have very little overhead. A more realistic approach to pricing is value based pricing. See THIS QUESTION for a few answers on how to ...


5

I (personally) think you shouldn't decrease your expected rate (if 40 is something that works for you) because you don't have enough experience. Experience is important, don't get me wrong, but they will be paying for results, so to say. And it's your portfolio that shows what you are capable of. I'd consider the following: How long do you think it would ...


5

Price is ALWAYS negotiable. But there's no advantage or reason that you need to remind anyone of that.



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