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If the reason that you want to be able to explain your work is so you can win them as a client - the goal here is to persuade. The best way to persuade is to speak to the heart of why they are hiring you. Every client that comes to you isn't coming to you just because they want graphic design but because they require the result of what graphic design brings ...


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In my experience, the best approach to have when explaining your work to clients (or other non-creative types) is to focus on what the job of the product is that you’re working on rather than focusing on what job you’re doing. If you’re focused on what the product is supposed to do then you can explain how your graphic decisions help the product do it's job. ...


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When I first meet a prospective client, the first thing I do is listen to their story and learn about their experience. This helps me to choose the right level of conversation to use. I have found that most people are overwhelmed by the fact that the Internet has become an industry employing millions of people, doing tasks that didn't exist 30 years ago. ...


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Point out, be visually objective and support your work with proven theories. When you say "non-creative" people I immediately recall Seniors and managers. So think abut it. These people have millions of things in their head day by day, so the best way to talk to them about what you do is being very objective. For real... Enumerate and think very well what ...


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There may be non-artistic people, but I have very rarely met non-creative people. It's just that their creativity comes out in different areas besides design and art. I find it most effective when selling my concepts to people who are not designers to approach things from a results point of view: what is the purpose for this work in the first place (a ...


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Here is my take as an outsider, that is I'm not a designer as you perceive it but rather a mechanical designer that designs machines. Though I have done graphic design work in the past. Most people indeed cannot understand the process. This is hardly surprising, not many people understand mechanical design, plumbing, ikebana or whatever. The thing is this ...


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For me, it's always the why. I've run into many situations where a client is initially uneasy about my work. Not because they outright dislike it, but because they don't think it fits with "what they've seen." When clients are accustomed to seeing the same thing over and over from themselves as well as any competitors, it can be a challenge to get them to ...


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The underlying challenge to your question is that of cross-level communication. 'Dumb down' your language about your work, but don't sounds condescending or pedantic at the same time. Rather than the existing, good answers, I'd like to give some general rules of thumb when talking about design with 'outsiders'. I've found that some of these help in making ...


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Before I give a direct answer, I think it's helpful to give a general definition of what we, as designers, do. Namely we design, defined by Oxford's dictionary as The purpose, planning, or intention that exists or is thought to exist behind an action, fact, or material object. In other words, design is being intentional. We have a thought or desire ...


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I will start by saying I have negative social skills with a seasoning of Aspie on them. So, taking that into account, here I go. Based on my Spock-like field work I have learnt that my non-creative clients (I have creative clients as well) tend to be problem solving oriented. They tend to focus on the problems they have and are very interested on how you ...



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