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5

While not 'free' perhaps the 'cheapest' logo vs. size of company of recent memory is this one: The twitter logo originated as a $6 piece of stock art. And, well, it actually worked out pretty good for them. It's been tweaked and customized since then but, hey, $6. That said, that's perhaps the exception to the rule. There's nothing wrong with stock art ...


9

The long and short if it is, it's about legal issues. Logos need to often be trademarked or registered. Using free resources often means the designer does not own the rights to the free item. So, rights certainly can't be provided to any client if the designer doesn't already own them. A copyright can not be acquired for something if you don't own the rights ...


6

First, most things in existence are copies of some idea or other. The skill to pick, search and match are worth while design skills*. In fact its often better to pick out things than to succumb to the not invented here syndrome. Second, you can draw. Logos are very geometrical and usually quite simple. Since every 3-5 year old I've interacted with last 5 ...


3

It is hard to create something completely unique and original. Every design is result of ideas and inspiration and other factors. Sometimes if you use free resources to use create design, it is more important if you manage to create "the message" and deliver what customer really needs and wants. It is a long process to create something completely unique an ...


23

If you don't like any, you'd have to pay more This is exactly what you should say. Now, prior to creating the logos, you should have a design briefing meeting with the client, so that the client can give you some direction and you're not just striking out blindly with your three designs. I like to give homework by asking "What are three (sites, ...


7

Clients expect my input and often leave me with little to nothing to work with so I'm doing basically their sales pitch in addition to their deliverables. This is your problem. Define in your scope of work what exactly you will provide and what exactly the client will provide. If the client is supposed to provide copy, spell out "Client will email a ...


8

There is one problem - I'm working on quite well-known freelance website Yea, that's really a giant problem. You'll likely never earn what a graphic designer is worth working on sites that are essentially set up as "How to find the absolute cheapest designer on earth". Point being that clients that hire freelance work from sites like this really don't ...


9

Just raising my rates seems very difficult It's pretty easy. Send out an email to your clients: As of day X my normal hourly rates for work will be increasing from Y to Z. You may lose a few clients, but eventually, you'll gain new ones that appreciate the work they're getting for the price. One reason clients start asking you for all the extras is ...


5

You will never get more on sites like that. Those sites nickel and dime designers and look for cheap people that want a solution. They could careless about the designers because they get paid regardless of your headaches. The better approach would be to establish yourself with examples of your work on a personal website and communicate. There are ...


17

Quote a price, then itemize on any estimate/invoice. If a client sends a broad statement like you've posted.... First ask questions even if you know the answers to them: Will you be providing the copy to use or is that something you want me to come up with? Do you have high resolution images you'd like to provide? Then respond with an itemized list of ...


5

It's not difficult to raise your rates if you can validate them. In your design brief or quote you should bill a few additional hours if you know you're spending time to develop content. I would look at your year-to-date projects and see if you can ball park the time spent wether it be in design, development, customer one-on-one. You should never cheat ...



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