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3

The solution is easy, do a selection so that the color-to-alpha only applies where it matters: the background and the edge pixels of the outline. On a clean picture, that's wand-select the background (regular threshold) which won't select the outline (it will usually stop one pixel before) and then Select>Grow by two pixels to include the border pixels. ...


3

For that specific brush you can't. Image brushes(*) are of two kinds: color or grayscale. The color ones are replicated verbatim, and so enforce their own colors. The grayscale brushes(**) work like (inverted) opacity masks for the foreground color, the black indicating full opacity and the white full transparency. What you can do is edit the brush ...


2

Hum. You are mixing too much issues, because you recognize you are still noob. Yoy feel the photos are not too good, but you do not know where are the errors. A bad result can be on several levels, let us call them steps. The photo a) The photo was taken with bad light conditions. Non flatering light. b) The photo has technical errors that can be ...


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Two basic things to check (Gimp): exposure is about correct: Windows>Dockable dialogs>Histogram: the graph should be "balanced", and reach both ends of the range. If it seems collapsed on the right the picture is overexposed, on the left the picture is under exposed. color balance is about correct: spot an element of the picture that should be gray or ...


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Elaborating on @xenoid's comment: What a path is What you see in your second screenshot, shown as circles joined by lines, is a path. Paths can be used for a lot of things, like creating reusable shapes, etc. They define a set lines that can be traced, aligned (to), exported to a vector graphic (like .svg) and used to create selections. What a selection ...


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I don't have the slightest idea of how you acheived that result - I just did the same thing, both in GIMP 2.8 and on a recent build of the development branch - and in both versions I got essentially the same image after mapping a white-to-black gradient to a white-to-black gradient as you did. Colors-Map->Gradient Map is the filter to use. I tried to ...


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Yes you can do this you will lose some stuff in rounding errors and dynamic range. just subtract the image from the background. Tough it does not seem like your operation is add. its possibly add plus a channel normalization. But yes i can reverse this by subtracting the mask and re normalizing the levels. Image 1:B-d Image 2:B-d + Normalized levels ...



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