Tag Info

Hot answers tagged

3

With the eraser tool we will replace pixel color information with alpha transparency in case there was an alpha channel (or background color if no alpha layer was defined). Removing this alpha channel will replace all alpha by the background color. This will sometimes lead to unwanted artifacts in semi-transparent areas. To overcome this we need to first ...


2

Yes, you can do it in Gimp, but in my opinion is simpler with ImageMagick (see also here). You need to put a lot of guidelines where you need to cut: And then simply apply the Guillotine transform: After this, you have the original image split in a lot of imagettes: And you have to save - pardon, export - each of them with a proper name. Ok, maybe ...


2

While @Takkat's answer is correct and should work for you, I have one step method which I prefer: Use the Curves tool (Colors->Curves), select the Alpha Channel, and simply drag the curve so that it is an horizontal line at the top. All Alpha information is mapped to "1" (full opacity). The effect may, of course, be achieved by the levels tool as well, ...


2

After all, the image needs to be cleaned. In GIMP you can use the Select By Color tool with a threshold of e.g. 30 and select the background: Delete the selection with del key and un-select with Shift-Ctrl-A: Scale the image to the desired size using a proper interpolation algorithm: Note that now the drawing is very little: In order to obtain a ...


2

For my answer I need a little preamble. In GIMP as well in other editors the images can have a specific channel named Alpha channel, so named from a process called alpha compositing, used to create the appearance of partial or full transparency. You can find here a simple diagram which illustrates this concept. Some image formats (e.g. PNG) are able to ...


1

After a few minutes more of poking around in Gimp I finally noticed that the selection tool had an anti-aliasing option, that was turned on. If this is not selected you get hard edged fills.


1

It will never be a perfect match, due to the change on the nature of the light sources themselves. (Daylight coming from the Sun is a point light - from a window is a directional soft light - nighttime photos will tipically have multiple, point light sources + wall reflection and so on) - you can't compensate for these changes in the raster image. But for ...


1

I would use another tool, like "image magick", to "compile" your exported png into slices. For example : http://www.imagemagick.org/Usage/crop/



Only top voted, non community-wiki answers of a minimum length are eligible