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4

The gray pixels aren't grey, they are partially transparent black pixels. If you replace black, you want to keep that partial transparency because this is what gives smooth edges. And there is an easy solution: Set the alpha-lock of the layer (this is the checkerboard icon at the top of the Layers list). Do not use selection. Bucket-fill the layer with ...


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You can draw the line that you want on a dedicated layer with 100% opacity, then set the layer at 70% opacity or as you like.


3

In Gimp: Open the document Open Hue-saturation tool ( Instructions ) When you got the Hue-saturation window open, just adjust the hue slider like a crazy person and you should see the colors change.


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Simply duplicate your 1 pixel line and shift it across by 1 pixel:


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Try Scribus. https://www.scribus.net/ But I really feel the need to write something extra. This is not meant as an insult in any way. On the contrary, it is to encourage you: Stop having a poor man's (woman) mentality. gobs of time (months) and thus money by going back and forth with the printer which apparently has been tweaking the colors at their ...


2

Unless you have the original Gimp file with the text still as a text layer, no you can't. Identifying a font from a raster image is complex and well beyond the scope of Gimp's feature set. There are online services that can help with font identification from an image, such as What The Font. You can also ask here on GD.SE, but make sure you ask a good ...


2

Set the options as you want them (for all the Tools, plus FG/BG colors, pattern, font, brush, etc....). Set the current tool to what you want the default tool to be. Then go to Edit>Preferences>Tool options, un-check Save tool options on exit and hit Save tool options now. From then on Gimp wil start up with all these options. You can in addition save ...


1

In Gimp: Open the texture picture Use File>Open as layers to open a the lion picture as a new layer Scale/move the lion layer Use one of the selection tools to make a selection following the shape of the lion (this is indeed the hard part... the adequate tools depends a lot on the lion's picture, this can take from a couple of seconds to a god half hour) ...


1

If you are going to print these then you are much better served by PostScript (PS) than SVG. PostScript engines have better quality checks than SVG. But more than that PS actually defines printer color spaces something that SVG does not do well at this point, not that most viewers would even begin to support this. Regardless of format issues you should be ...


1

In ImageMagick or GraphicsMagick: mogrify -fuzz 50% -fill violet -opaque "#F4BF75" *.png I used "identify -verbose file.png" to display the histogram and determine that #F4BF75 is the predominant orange color present. The fuzzing is needed because your samples are antialiased and have a variety of approximately orange colors present. You can omit "-fuzz ...


1

Have a look at Filters>Light and Shadows>Lighting effects and especially at the Environment map tab (which is a picture whose tints are reflected in the object). You may also want to add a bump map to help create the right shadows.


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Set the foreground color to dark blue (the color that will replace black), the background color to white. Set the image to RGB mode if not already such: Image>Mode>RGB Set the current gradient to FG to BG (RGB) (fourth from top in Gradients list) Colors>Map>Gradient map


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Basically you make up your own image, and export it as a .GBR file, in a directory that you'll find in Edit>Preferences>Folders>Brushes. If the brush image is grayscale (as in Image>Mode>Grayscale), then it is considered an opacity mask, the white is transparent and the black is replaced by the foreground color. If the image is RGB then it is used as is. ...


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The best way to replace a range of gray values (even very dark gray) with some color is to use Color>Map>Gradient map But if you just want a mask, duplicate the layer, Color>Desaturate and then use the Threshold tool, or Brightness/Contrast for a smoother transition, or even the Levels or Curves tools.



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