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GIMP correctly informs the user on the image size based on the number of pixels and resolution metadata - as can be set on image->print size... menu option. It may be that some of the less used image formats have a buggy export of the resolution information, but that is certainly not the case for PNG or JPG. As put in the comments above it is MS Word ...


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Another possible way: Zoom the picture and use the free selection tool to select the parts you want to keep, then invert the selection and remove the selected background (if you have transparency on the layer, if not you first have to add an alpha layer to your current layer), I mostly use this method over the fuzzy select because most times I achieve better ...


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The problem is not Gimp is the algorithm used to Overlay the layer which depends in Light and Dark colors. So, to get the effect you want follow this steps: Go to the layers stack > Right Click > Click Merge Visible Layers Click Merge Go to Layer > Transparency > Color to Alpha Select Black in the Color to Alpha Color Picker > Click OK (Two times) ...


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Use the Pen Tool (p) on photoshop and draw around the outline of the reference, go to the paths toolbar (next to layers tab), right click the path, and click stroke. This will give you the effect you are looking for. Then it is up to you to make use of it.


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If instead of going to a vectors app, you want to deal with pixes, inside GIMP, you can try these simple two steps, selct:filters->blur-> gaussian blue - try using a radius of 2-4, and then use colors->curves and pull the curve in an "S" shape to sharpen the borders back. The jaggies will smooth out, and you can fine tune how smooth you ant it with ...


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Open the Python console in filters->python->console - get a reference to your image, typing img = gimp.image_list()[0] and press enter. Hit the browse button at the botton of the dialog and select gimp- paintbrush-default and hit apply - it will paste a template for calling that function in the Python console - something like this: >>> ...


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In order to make lines smooth, you have to vectorize the bitmap in applications like Inkscape: You can import the image and trace it: After the tracing operation the image is vectorized and you can work on the nodes. For example you can simplify the path, which is an automatic operation: In this example the left image is the traced one and the right ...


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Custom Gradients in Gimp Designing our custom gradients in Gimp (2.8) can be done from the gradients menu (CtrlG). Here are steps to create a gradient with center transparent, white left, white right sides: Create a new gradient Choose actions from the right click context menu: Select Left Endpoint's Color white and Right Endpoint's Color transparent: ...


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As mentioned by thebodzio, you've specified the aspect ratio, but not the size. GIMP has no way of knowing how many pixels are in an inch (ppi), so it guesses. You can specify the ppi when creating a new image: Or after the image is created, in Image > Print size: However the easiest way is to use Fit canvas to layers in Image as mentioned by Paolo ...


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It seems you can get slightly better results by stroking the path with the pencil tool, using a single-pixel brush:         They're still not quite as nice and symmetrical as the pixel art circles produced by the Bresenham circle algorithm used in MS paint, but at least they're a little bit closer.


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What is probably going on is that the target image is not in RGB mod, rather in indexed mode. (It will be so if its file in disk is indexed, like a GIF or an indexed PNG). GIMP does not represent semi-transparency levels on indexed images - change the target image to RGB mode in image->mode->RGB before pasting your contents there. If afterwards ...


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This has to do with image color profiles - in GIMP, before opening your file for editing, go to edit->preferences, and in the Color Management page, set the File Open Behavior to Ask What To Do - then try different actions - one of which should preserve the numeric color values.


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The GIF specifications do not allow semi-transparency which would be needed for anti-aliasing a border to the transparent background. To overcome this you may generate a fake semi-transparency by dithering the output on exporting to GIF (see my answer to this question: GIF with transparency output not as expected in GIMP). The resulting image qualtity may ...


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You possibly need to work in a higher resolution. If you set up your file to print/view at, say, 72 dpi (standard Internet image resolution), your text is going to be fuzzy for print work. Try working at a much higher resolution. This means your font size will be bigger and you'll view your work at less than 100%, but you'll have crisper edges to your ...


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I had been having this problem FOREVER and I just found a solution, even though the person I was talking to about the move tool made me actually figure out the problem. The alignment tool is selecting the top most layer where ever you click, regardless of what layer you have selected/transparencies. Try hiding the layers above what you are trying to work ...


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Yes. The similar tools are surface blur, which is mostly same and then there is the smart blur. For reference see: Photoshop Filter Effects Reference



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