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0

Michael Schumacher was right about the root cause. The layer has a fixed size. So the correct answer, at least for Gimp 2.8 is to select the layer, then select "Layer"->"Layer To Image size" from the menu.


2

Unless you have the original Gimp file with the text still as a text layer, no you can't. Identifying a font from a raster image is complex and well beyond the scope of Gimp's feature set. There are online services that can help with font identification from an image, such as What The Font. You can also ask here on GD.SE, but make sure you ask a good ...


1

Have a look at Filters>Light and Shadows>Lighting effects and especially at the Environment map tab (which is a picture whose tints are reflected in the object). You may also want to add a bump map to help create the right shadows.


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I'm thinking that perhaps setting two quick guides onto the centre of the original selection and then creating a new one might be relatively easy and quick, but again - not an ideal solution.


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Set the foreground color to dark blue (the color that will replace black), the background color to white. Set the image to RGB mode if not already such: Image>Mode>RGB Set the current gradient to FG to BG (RGB) (fourth from top in Gradients list) Colors>Map>Gradient map


-1

I used CamScanner in Android to do some 'magic'. This is all i got: The resolution of your image is like 72 dpi. No OCR software can operate at such low resolution. You need to take a picture with at least 300 dpi resolution in order to do an efficient OCR (optical character recognition). That means you need a 5 Mpix camera.


0

Can you take a picture again? Or was that picture sent to you by someone else and you can't get another good shot? Try taking pics of documents using Office Lens It takes a good quality photo with focus on making the text readable, adjusting the brightness and contrast automatically.


0

First, save a copy of the image to experiment with. ;) Then you could try increasing the contrast, carefully. I can't tell if the one you posted is the actual size of the image. If so, it's pretty bad. But if it's actually larger than this, you might have a chance.


0

if the white in your icons is actually transparency: Set the alpha-lock for the layer (checkerboard icon at top of layer list) Make sure you have no selection Bucket fill with new color, the alpha-lock will protect the transparent pixels (actually, it will make sure all pixels keep their initial opacity).


1

Basically you make up your own image, and export it as a .GBR file, in a directory that you'll find in Edit>Preferences>Folders>Brushes. If the brush image is grayscale (as in Image>Mode>Grayscale), then it is considered an opacity mask, the white is transparent and the black is replaced by the foreground color. If the image is RGB then it is used as is. ...


1

In ImageMagick or GraphicsMagick: mogrify -fuzz 50% -fill violet -opaque "#F4BF75" *.png I used "identify -verbose file.png" to display the histogram and determine that #F4BF75 is the predominant orange color present. The fuzzing is needed because your samples are antialiased and have a variety of approximately orange colors present. You can omit "-fuzz ...


3

You can draw the line that you want on a dedicated layer with 100% opacity, then set the layer at 70% opacity or as you like.


3

In Gimp: Open the document Open Hue-saturation tool ( Instructions ) When you got the Hue-saturation window open, just adjust the hue slider like a crazy person and you should see the colors change.


0

Your method didn't work for me, but quite to my surprise, I found another one on my own which worked fine: go to Layers Window (CTRL + L), uncheck all layers which wouldn't show missing background (i.e. gray-checkered surface), open all of them in turn then every time go to Layer menu (my Layers Window was not cooperative for that), open ...


2

Try Scribus. https://www.scribus.net/ But I really feel the need to write something extra. This is not meant as an insult in any way. On the contrary, it is to encourage you: Stop having a poor man's (woman) mentality. gobs of time (months) and thus money by going back and forth with the printer which apparently has been tweaking the colors at their ...


0

Duplicate layer Autocrop copy Figure out the size and offsets of a potential square crop of the layer from the cropped width, height and offsets. remove copy crop the original layer using gimp-layer-resize Something like this: # -*- coding: utf-8 -*- #!/usr/bin/env python import os, sys from gimpfu import * def squareCrop(image,layer): pdb....


0

To keep some of the texture in the black: Use the fuzzy selector to select the black (I used a threshold of 16.4, selects everything without spilling) Select>Grow by two pixels Make sure you have an alpha channel Color/Color to alpha and remove black (000000). The black goes transparent, but not completely... Add a new layer below, and fill with required ...


0

I am asuming you have a good understanding of gimp. I won't get into much detail. With that image is almost impossible without heavely painting it again. 1) Mask the black part. 2) Copy it as a new layer. 3) In curves, move up the red and green channels. Play with them to achive a simmilar color. This layer will probably be usless as a final layer, ...


1

The best way to replace a range of gray values (even very dark gray) with some color is to use Color>Map>Gradient map But if you just want a mask, duplicate the layer, Color>Desaturate and then use the Threshold tool, or Brightness/Contrast for a smoother transition, or even the Levels or Curves tools.


0

Get and open up Inkscape (completely free, open source vector editor). Import your reference image into Inkscape (File > Import) Start blocking in the polygons and triangles around the faces of the people in the image. If you look closely at the wallpaper, the most basic shapes (large, non-detailed shapes) are at least 3 sides (duh). I would block them in in ...


0

The "Move selection" in the Move tools is about moving the selection mask, not the selected pixels. Right after you have made a selection, you can Alt-Ctrl-drag and this will make a floating selection automatically and start moving it. However, this is a cut/paste and not a copy/paste, so it will leave a "hole" in the source layer.


2

Set the options as you want them (for all the Tools, plus FG/BG colors, pattern, font, brush, etc....). Set the current tool to what you want the default tool to be. Then go to Edit>Preferences>Tool options, un-check Save tool options on exit and hit Save tool options now. From then on Gimp wil start up with all these options. You can in addition save ...


0

In GIMP, you should copy the current layer (the one with the picture), use Gaussian Blur on the bottom layer and manipulate the colors a bit (from the color dialogue), scale down the top layer with Scale Layer, and then flatten the image. Finally, use the Crop tool to make it square.


0

You should select the background with the color select tool, then invert the selection (CTRL+I) and there you go, you have selected the entire foreground, including the 'grey' pixels, which actually are black pixels with transparency.


4

The gray pixels aren't grey, they are partially transparent black pixels. If you replace black, you want to keep that partial transparency because this is what gives smooth edges. And there is an easy solution: Set the alpha-lock of the layer (this is the checkerboard icon at the top of the Layers list). Do not use selection. Bucket-fill the layer with ...


2

Simply duplicate your 1 pixel line and shift it across by 1 pixel:


1

Elaborating on @xenoid's comment: What a path is What you see in your second screenshot, shown as circles joined by lines, is a path. Paths can be used for a lot of things, like creating reusable shapes, etc. They define a set lines that can be traced, aligned (to), exported to a vector graphic (like .svg) and used to create selections. What a selection ...



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