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1

If you can work in 3D, adding lighting to your scene and rendering with ambient occlusion will add a lot of depth. Try using lights that are not white and tint your flood and fill lights with cross compliment colors for a more dynamic feel. If you are only working in Gimp, simply paint over the base layer of the character to add depth and mood. Start by ...


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You need to add some lighting to your image. It's very flat. Notice the shadows and highlights in picture you're aiming for. Yours doesn't have those.


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I found a workaround for the malfunction: before exporting to PDF, create a new layer mask for layers that have transparencies - when creating the mask, pick the option "Transfer Layer's Alpha Channel". The layer should look the same. Then, export the image as PDF and check the "Apply layer masks before saving". The transparency specified in the layer mask ...


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Nevermind! I had gimp installed in the wrong folder.


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This kind of operation could be simply performed with Imagemacick using crop function. In your example: convert your_image.png -crop 423x275+0+113 -background transparent -flatten cropped_image.png The output is: Using a batch file you can process all your images. Edit convert works even using in the geometry dimensions greater than the dimensions ...


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Sorry - this you are pointing too is not the oficial GIMP manual - it is on "tutorial" section - and the proposed tool there does not actually exist. I don't know what it is doing in "tutorials" - it is a loose bunch of ideas on what would be possible to do using GIMP scripting - however, from the first third of that post and bellow it is just a lot of ...


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As soon as you select 'Export as' option in the file menu, you are directed to a dialog box where you specify the name of the file. When you click export you get an option dialog box. Select the Convert bitmaps to vector graphics where possible in export dialog box. Resulting PDF won't have a fringe.


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Try flattening the layers before export.


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In order to use transparencies with GIMP, you need to add an alpha layer. Check your Image Mode; if you are in Indexed or Grayscale mode, convert to RGB mode. The options for adding alpha layers (RGBA) will then be available. The relevant parts of the documentation are: 4.7. Change the Mode 7.33. Add Alpha Channel


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After you're done creating an SVG in Inkscape, you can just select the clipart and copy it using Ctrl+C and then paste it in GIMP using Ctrl+V. It is as simple as that. However, Ctrl+C from Inkscape and Ctrl+V in GIMP may not work sometimes. In that case, you might want to copy it from Inkscape just like before and then go to GIMP, Go to Edit > Paste As ...


2

The fastest and easiest way is just to look at the bottom left corner of your workspace. There you'll find the exact position of your cursor (1). You can even change the dropdown to cm, px, inches, etc. (2) Of course, this isn't very accurate, but it gets the job done fast and dirty. A second and more accurate way is using the pointer dialog. You can ...


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To do so go to Filters > Map > Tile Then change size to your desired size To change current image uncheck "Create New Image" I would suggest keeping that checked to create a new image. Then click OK. As you can see it has created a new image. In my example the original size was 100x100 The tiled size is 400x400.


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I think the fastest way to do this: Method 1: If you already have a vector Add some white shapes on top of your graphic to hide the details. Then open the "pathfinder" panel, select all and "divide" everything. Then select at a piece of white, go in the menu "select" and choose "select same fill color". And delete the white parts. Method 2: In Photoshop ...


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Basing this upon comments which elude to laser etching not printing..... They are much different. For laser etching you ideally want the vector graphic. I'm uncertain if GIMP can do that, since it's a raster-based application. This is especially true if dealing with only 4cm. The original image should hold up okay. Some of the smaller detail will be ...


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To simplify line art, it's often a matter of just doing it by hand. Delete the extra nodes, smooth out the lines as you see fit. Lots of hand tweaking. However, here's one more automated technique I've used that sometimes works. From top-to-bottom: Original Image Image with a slight Gaussian blur applied Image after adjusting Levels to sharpen the edges ...


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It might not be a smart method, but here’s how I do this: The “layer1” has a transparent background. Copy “layer1”, protect the transparent area, and fill it with pure black. Go to channel dialog, and drag one RGB channel down to create a new channel. It doesn’t matter which one, R or G or B, you drag. Make sure to set “layer 1” invisible. The picture ...


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If the logo is the same color, you can use the Select By Color Tool(). Choose the Select By Color Tool then click and drag on an orange part until all of the orange is covered. Copy(Ctrl+C) and paste(Ctrl+V) the selection and make a new layer from it and put a white filled layer underneath it. After this, you can then clean up the orange a bit ...


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I've just come up with something which is somewhat better than the original: Step 1: Resize to 200% Step 2: Colour -> Desaturate > By lightness Step 3: Colour-> Curves: Step 4: Colour -> Colourize Step 5: Resize to 50% (i.e. back to 100% of original) Result:


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I've been getting around this by box selecting around the item I want to antialias with a 5 pixel border. Then I fill the transparent area with a color that is different from the item I am modifying, but set the fill opacity to 1. Keep the current box select and do the antialias filter. Then use the fuzzy select tool (with threshold set to 0) and select ...


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BTW, I don't want to change only the "#3d507d" pixels, I want to change also the "gradiented"/"Edged"/"partly transparent" pixels to match the change I am not entirely sure what data you have, but if you happen to have SVGs (or another vector format), the problem with partial pixels does not arise, as there are no pixels in the first place. In this ...


2

I don't know much about Gimp but maybe you can use my Photoshop example and find a way in Gimp to achieve this. In Photoshop, I would make an action that does something like this and then do a batch processing: 1) put the image to grayscale, 2) change the image mode to duotone mode using your new color + a gray 3) convert back to RGB mode 4) save. ...


1

Not the fastest method but imho the best. 1) Convert the image to grayscale. 2) Invert the image. You need a negative version. 3) Adjust the levels of the image (Colors > Levels) Untill you clean the image. The point here is to have a pure black, some aliasing and pure white. 4) Copy to the clipboard. 5) Make a new file with only the color you need. ...


2

As AndrewH mentioned, since the background is plain white, you can select it and invert the selection, then fill it with the color you want. Here's how. Choose the "Select By Color" tool and click on the white background. In the menu bar, go to "Select->Invert"(the shortcut is Ctrl+I). In the menu bar, go to "Edit->Fill with FG Color" making sure the ...



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