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19

When you open the TTF webfont in use on Google websites, you get some metadata and a link to this URL: https://www.google.com/fonts/license/productsans It says: Google offers many fonts on open source terms. This is not one of them. Please see www.google.com/fonts.


14

I'd probably call these type of illustrations 'vector illustrations', because they look like, at least regarding the original source files, they could be scaled up easily. If I were looking for them, to use on for example on a website, I might also search for the term "flat". You can use different programs to make them, if you are looking for a free ...


14

Decide where your light source is, and stick to that. As you look closer at all icons in the example, they have their light source at 315°—top left. All shadows and shading obey that light source. In your icon, the dark left page suggests the light coming from 270°—left, yet the shading on the green and red pages suggest a light source ...


14

Arimo (see samples above and below) is identical to Liberation Sans (suggested by Yisela) and available from Google Fonts. The following font stack includes Arimo and suppresses the substitution of Arial for Helvetica on Windows machines and WebKit browsers, but otherwise puts the most Helvetica-Neue-like fonts first: "Helvetica Neue", ...


14

It's not in Google fonts (I think), but the .ttf can easily be converted for @font-face. I find Liberation Sans really beautiful. Plus it renders REALLY well in most browsers, and it's free for personal and commercial use: http://www.dafont.com/liberation-sans.font


12

That's the thing about Helvetica, there isn't really anything quite like it. We are talking about one of the (if not the) most beautiful font in existence. You could settle for Open Sans or Source Sans Pro but it won't be the same. But you probably already know that as there are only 121 fonts to choose from.


10

I just tried the "Roboto" font and it seems OK:


8

The below was done in Illustrator but could be done in Photoshop. First create your object. For the demonstration I am using a linear gradient. You can mess around with a gradient mesh for more complex shapes. I set the right side to have the color and the left to 0% opacity. Select your gradient and go to Effect - Texture - Grain Mess around with the ...


7

I've been wondering that myself. First, "500" doesn't seem to indicate how many colors there are, but the weird numbering system they use. 500 is the base, 400 is lighter than the base, 600 is darker. That's pretty similar to how font-weights are numbered (info) so maybe that has something to do with it. I've found that some of the numbers less than 500 ...


6

I think you were on the right track with your watermarking option, but you left too much of the original image in tact. Here are two images I tried that Google was unable to find: Checkerboard Reverse image search results Mosaic Reverse image search results Another example Reverse image search results The first image returns a lot of "checkered ...


5

Another option that's more flexible than either of those is using @font-face. It's free, and you can use whatever font you want. Just have to upload the font to wherever the site's hosted and specify it in the css. Only thing is you have to convert the font format to be compatible with different browsers. Here's an example - say you want to use the ...


5

Google may use a different system but a large number of such services (tineye included) use perceptual hashes where the overall hash is close enough to be a match, rather than exact. A whitepaper showed up a few years back which detailed the process. I haven't been able to find a link to it, but the basic system relies on a action chain to generate the ...


5

Try this one (although it is not yet complete for all the Google fonts): http://joelcrawfordsmith.com/closest-font/


5

Short answer: Google is much faster than you hosting it yourself. Long Answer: Putting it on your own server might seem like a good idea to improve load times. After all, the files are closer to your webpage. But, no. After all, when a user goes to your website, initially they just get some HTML. Here we have references to other files: Images, JS, CSS, and, ...


5

This is a good question the GUI has no indication on what that means. However your hunch that its size in compressed KB does seem to be quite close. I would tip this is the correct answer. How do i reach this conclusion? Well if I unpack 2 fonts and save them and zip the result I get windows to say that the two fonts zipped use up: 119 KB versus Google's ...


4

I do not know of any type-pairing sites specifically but I will list some resources I have come across on the subject as well as places you could ask typographers directly about the topic. Check Smashing Mag as they have done at least a few articles on type-pairing and they link to the resources and web-sites they mention in the articles. I do not know the ...


4

Here are two links.. i found these useful to find the fonts.. but you have to select font's image of reasonable size. http://www.whatfontis.com/ http://www.myfonts.com/WhatTheFont/ I hope this will help you if you have only images (font's JPGs etc) then first you will need to know the name of that font. And there are 50+% chances to find the font ...


4

First, are you happy with the type selections and the character spacing of fonts on Google Web Fonts? I haven't used them yet, although I have seen at least one or two sites with excellent results using them. At the same time, some of the displays of their fonts show poor letterfit (mostly too much space between letters). If you need to match to Adobe ...


3

In all the simple button examples (including other examples in the animation section), the ripple effect compliments the colour of the text or icon - which should follow readability (use a colour contrast checker if in doubt). In general, this is common sense: if you have a 'dark' button requiring light text, adding light ink will be visible and consistent; ...


3

I don't know of an automated tool that will do what you're looking for, but if you don't mind setting up some test pages you can preview them using Browsershots.org or Adobe's Browser Lab. Both services are free (though Adobe's requires an Adobe ID) and will show you screenshots of your site in different browsers and operating systems. Browsershots has a ...


3

I did it for CS5...link here. Enjoy! Let me know if there's a way I can improve it.


2

Google fonts: http://www.google.com/fonts Google fonts is an ever-growing repository of hosted open-source typefaces you can use on your web site. Being open source, as well as hosted, it's incredibly easy to use them. It's not a particular service, rather it's just of one of many, many things google provides web developers and designers. Creating a ...


2

Per Google after a little search: Things not permitted: Don't copy or imitate Google's trade dress, including the look and feel of Google web design properties or Google brand packaging, distinctive color combinations, typography, graphic designs, product icons, or imagery associated with Google. Source


2

You have to test, some web fonts have different kerning and tracking settings that their print counterparts. While most of the times the differences are not that big, you could get a huge print fail if a font is web-optimised.


2

They are fine for print, as far as freeware fonts go. They aren't designed or programmed for demanding typographic features but they'll get the job done. In fact there are some very well designed examples, within the limited typographic support provided. I have noticed (mostly comping for web) that they have some strange display quirks in desktop apps. In ...


2

From what i know, Web fonts basically are the same fonts you use on desktop (like TTF,OTF) with some optimization that basically does not screwes up the vector paths, like a reduced glyph set etc.. You can learn more if you try to build your own on http://www.fontsquirrel.com/fontface/generator, and check the optimization options. Anyway i printed a lot ...


2

In terms of technology they are pretty much the same. In terms of product, they differ in that Google is focusing on open source offerings (no cost) while Typekit is focusing on commercial type licensing. The decision as to which to use would really come down to which typeface you want to use. Note that a lot of foundries and type distributors are now ...


2

Perhaps you've already found this resource, but Google has put together an incredibly handy guide to help developers and designers sync up with the new Material vibe. The whole guide can be found here - http://www.google.com/design/spec/material-design/introduction.html# Specifically, this page makes all their favorite colors available for download - ...


2

Google is ok to use if you're looking for inspiration - just be aware NOT to copy/plagiarize that art & design. There are other tools you can get design inspirations from: design magazines (HOW and Communication Arts for example), a folder of your recent logos and designs, design books (check out Creative Workshop), etc. There are also sites for design ...


2

The first thing to say, is that I want to be honest and I'm affiliate to the software I present bellow (I'm the software designer/programmer of this font identification engine) and I'm really proud about it :) It's not an online service but a software application that runs on your Mac or Windows PC: http://www.findmyfont.com It takes as input a Text image ...



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