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0

Easyest way: 1. Make rectangle colored red. 2. Make second rectangle on top of first one, make it as gradient from White (CMYK 0:0:0:0) to Black (CMYK 0:0:0:100). Put the second rectangle opacity as Multiply. That's it. If you will experience problems because of the printhouse needs of no transparency effects, you can just rasterize these two objects in one ...


2

I think the best way to make editable gradients that can be edited or changed easily whenever and however u please, is to use > add layer style > Gradient overlay . Then at any time, from the layer of the gradient: you can click on the effects icon (eye icon) > gradient ovelay icon and edit it as you may wish .(of course in the PSD file) .


0

didnt see a response for windows version but it is ctrl+alt+g to turn back on


5

Create a circle and make it's stroke as wide as the circle itself. In the image I made a circle 100px wide, thus I made the stroke 100 px wide. I then set the stroke fill as a gradient.


3

Using the Mesh tool with some tweaking will get you the desired results.


0

I notice if you render the element containing your gradient with the GPU using transform:translateZ(0), it render smoother, not perfect, but smoother.


2

You can convert GIMP gradients to PaintShop Pro at cptutils-online, and you should be able to import those into PhotoShop (both are variants of the GRD format, PSP uses version 3, PS uses version 5). If PS does not recognise the files with a .PspGradient extension then try renaming them with a .grd


0

The gradient format in photoshop, unlike GIMP's is a proprietary binary format. There are some tools that can be found to make the conversion - I could find cptutils - which also features an online version. Another option, if photoshop has the ability to import gradients from CSS files, GIMP can export its gradients to CSS, by right-clicking on them on the ...


2

You might want to try the Ultimate CSS Gradient Generator. It allows you to create a gradient in an Adobe-like UI, including transparency, and outputs sextuple-redundant css so your gradient renders as nice as possible in any thinkable browser. Any features a browser doesn't support, it tries to degrade gracefully.


3

I'd stick to Illustrator just because it's so easy there.... There's no real benefit to using Photoshop if you have access to Illustrator. Draw a rectangle Choose Object > Path > Split Into Grid... Set the number of rows and columns you want in addition to the gutter between them Fill the shapes with your gradient Use the Gradient Tool to position ...


2

For Photoshop Edit: * As pointed out in the comments, this uses a linear gradient, rather than progressing row-wise. For a quick adjustment to make it work correctly see comment at the end. This will create a square (500x500 pixels) gradient grid with 10x10 colours. For other dimensions, start with a square and change the image size before adding the ...


3

Follow these steps in Adobe Illustrator: 1) Create a small box in the top left corner of your artboard. 2) Do the same for the other corners of the grid. 3) Choose desired colors 4) Blend the 2 columns with the blend tool and choose the amount of steps you want 5) Expand the blends with Object > Expand (or Expand Appearance) 6) Now blend the two ...



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