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1

Comply with the IRE reference levels and the logo will render correctly.IRE = Institute of Radio Engineers. Peak white is not 255, 100%, etc. and reference black is not 0, 0%. The value for IRE peak white is 95% representing specular highlights. The value for IRE black is 3%. Attempting to exceed these in a raster image forces averaging of the signal with ...


0

Vishnu, Have you just tried turning it into an action & recording it to do the same thing as often as you wish. No fuss No muss.


0

That is MPEG noise. MPEG is very similar to JPEG in the abstract and, like JPEG, high contrast and line art is sort of a worst-case use for the compression method, which was developed for use in photography where adjacent pixel values are more random. The best option for you is to ramp up the quality/bitrate/render-passes when baking the video. Also, ...


0

You are right in that it is a problem with the bit depth of TVs. That will cause banding (you can see lines in the gradient). Dither and Noise can help the banding but only to a limited degree. Sadly a black to white gradient is naturally very prone to banding, maybe choosing different colors can help. What I can also see on your TV, is that it has too much ...


1

You can make a shape around the text Color it Black And then set Gaussian blur to the shape, works nicely with irregular shapes. Will work both in Illustrator and Photoshop.


0

So a collaborator finally fixed this. The issue was that the gradient used pixels, which can apparently not be rendered by mayor browsers. So changing the gradient to this XML fixed it: <radialGradient inkscape:collect="always" xlink:href="#linearGradient7636" id="radialGradient7642" cx="50%" cy="50%" fx="50%" fy="50%" r="40%" ...


2

Gradients have always been an issue for us on our Rolands. The ripping software just doesn't interpret them correctly. I've found the easiest way around this is to hide your cut line, rasterize your artwork at the resolution and color space of your choice, and show your path again. Now your artwork is a high resolution bitmap under a vector cut line, ...


0

You can't easily do this 'without creating another slider tab', but... if you create a new, temporary slider tab at the point where you wish to sample the colour, then drag the colour from the 'colour' palette (which will now be the colour of the new tab that you just created) to the tab that you wish to recolour and then delete the tab that you just created ...


-2

I don't have Illustrator, but this is the general technique I can do in GIMP. The same technique should be applicable to Illustrator: Start with black background In gradient editor, create a custom gradient that consists of three equal-sized segments. The first third is solid foreground color, the second third is linear gradient from foreground to ...


10

One way would be to apply a linear gradient on the stroke. Create a circle, and stroke it with a gradient pattern. Make sure the gradient has the stops like in the table and picture below. The gradient might not look as smooth in the transitions, but that's all that comes to mind. +------------+---------------+----------+ | Color Stop | RGB | ...


0

Make sure that the gradient layer is absolutely transparent on the transparent side. I could imagine a single row of non-transparent pixels creating this error. Also ensure that the blending mode for the black gradient layer is set to multiply. I'd recommend using layer effects for creating gradients like these, instead of using separate layers superimposed ...


1

Transparent gradients are not supported in PDF. There is no neat solution to this problem, what you could try and do is flatten the gradients to bitmaps before exporting. To do this, go to Layer > Flatten selection to bitmap.


7

This has to do with the algorithm that InkScape and other graphics programs use to create gradients, namely (pseudo-code): var gradient = [] var firstColor, secondColor, steps for i in range(steps): p = i/steps R = firstColor.R * p + secondColor.R * (1 - p) G = firstColor.G * p + secondColor.G * (1 - p) B = firstColor.B * p + secondColor.B * (1 - p) ...


2

They are most probably vector paths with manipulated transparency. You can create vector paths using Pen Tool (hotkey: P) then assign them proper fill (color or gradient) and then manipulate their transparency in the layers panel. EDIT: Create a vector path using Pen Tool (hotkey: P). Then right-click inside the path and choose "convert to selection". ...


6

You can do this in Photoshop with custom brush you need to define (rectangle shape) and then play with the settings (remember that "roundness" in this case will be thickness of the shape. This is what you could get. In illustrator the easiest way (for me) would be do create few different patterns, fill objects with them, then expand and multiply and ...



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