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Paper Plane font from 'Entypo' Picto gram Suite.


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What about an icon representing a diary? It fits most of the feelings you're trying to evoke. It might be hard making it look like a diary rather than just a book, but it's a starting point at least!


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you have a variety of options: already mentioned, and probably your best bet is to use media queries for showing certain screens certain things. css3 offers up multiple background images, which you could tailor with media queries. if you are using an actual img / element in your markup, don't forget that you can apply background images to it via css. i've ...


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Well, the idea of an Animated GIF is that the entire image is replaced with another, like a flipbook. So this isn't possible with that format. Sounds like what you are trying to achieve is to animate a UI screen on a device, in which you would need to use a program like After Effects to animate your screen, then place it over a photo of your device. After ...


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If i get you right and the big picture wont animate and get "replaced" on the little screen: it is possible with responsive webdesign. choosing-a-responsive-image-solution and just replace the big image with ur animated gif via media queries on the small screen


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First draw a velocity profile. After that, pick the Selector tool (the first one) and single-click the shape representing the velocity profile. The handles around the bounding box will change from scaling handles to rotation and shear handles. Use the handles in the middle of the edges to shear (aka skew, tilt) the shape. To duplicate shapes, use Ctrl+D. If ...


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Here's what's happening under the hood: regardless of the fact that you have a pixel-based document, InDesign can only work with it as if it were a paper document. InDesign "thinks" in physical dimensions. As far as it's concerned, 1 pixel == 1 point. Since there are 72 points to an inch, InDesign considers there are 72 pixels to an inch. As far as the ...


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Disclaimers: I don't typically program in Python unless I have to fix someone else's code I've never used Matplotlib - this is my first attempt at using it and, since it looked interesting, the ONLY reason I'm posting this answer. Now a more robust answer: (Not that I enjoy doing homework for PhD candidates...) Everything here was stolen - flat out ...


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First: .PY + Matplotlib -> .SVG Then, .SVG -> Inkskape However, .SVG is easy enough to learn to go .PY -> .SVG You could also do .PY + Matplotlib -> .PDF. Inkscape would open that as well.


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Graphing applications that do vector output are available. Ive used following applications quite successfully: Mathematica <- my preference it can do images like above Matlab (remember to export eps) Python using matplotlib Maple PSTricks Illustrator Xara Inkscape Autocad Tough you may need to use 3d apps or graph apps as well I suggest: yEd, ...


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Your best bet is to pick up a vector editor and learn how to use it. The examples above do not seem complicated, and a basic understanding of drawing vectors would do the job just fine. If you will be trying one out, I would advise against Illustrator or Corel Draw. While both are powerful and popular tools of choice, they will seem daunting for a beginner. ...



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