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1

Looks like 3D software, free one is Blender Example of complex structures


4

Judging by the ambient occlusion and reflections, this looks like it has been created using 3D modelling software like 3ds max, or Maya. However those are both industry-leading software packages and cost a lot (trust me). You might be better off trying to find a free solution, like Blender, or mimicking the effect in an illustration program like Adobe ...


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For a 2d side scrolling game. Vector style. Using Stencyl That is the key bit of info we needed! Looking at their documentation for animations it looks like animation is handled within the app--meaning that you create the individual animations yourself outside, then import them as individual frames. As such, it appears that the tool you need is a ...


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Either of these tools could be all inclusive for this question and the one you asked about general graphics For game development Flash is still common these days. If you want to go the html5/CSS3/SVG route, you can try Adobe Edge Animate, to assist, but it is not as mainstream as Flash. Either way, with Illustrator and Photoshop also included, you should ...


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Creative Market is designed for just this purpose. There are a lot of great resources from designers looking to capitalize on their creative overflow. Veer has been around longer. It's more of a standard stock art site. If you remember EyeWire from years long past, these are the guys.


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A professional's guide to process Designing Logos: The Process of Creating Symbols That Endure This is a detailed, sometimes dry, but comprehensive work. Logo, Font, & Lettering Bible I hate recommending this one because it has to be one of the ugliest books in the business. Nonetheless, the author knows his stuff. The bigger picture Designing ...


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It's maybe not so current (2008), but you want a book to helps you understand the ingredients of good logos (and not-so-good), Really Good Logos Explained by Rockport is great. A collection of 500 great logos critiqued by a panel of internationally acclaimed designers ...though that actually misses what's great about the book: they're not all "great ...


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I would suggest devising your own exercises and practicing. Brands are fairly abstract so it might help to start with a more concrete topic. One assignment that I give sometimes is to illustrate a Jean de LaFontaine fable in negative/positive space. You could do the same with any movie or any simple story. Also, you might want to try some Escher like ...


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If you want it just for a quick thing, you can always use double layers one for the square and one for the stroke, select the strokes and apply the "erase" blend mode, change the background to transparent and save for web, done. Another method that might work if the squares will be only one color is to use the convert to alpha live effect, I use this pretty ...


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The principles for minimal logo design are good illustration skills paired with brand identity. The examples you gave are not logos but merely animal illustrations. It is easy to illustrate something that has a clear message, like "elephant", or "dog". And the clever use of negative space is simply practice. What makes this process so much harder for logos ...


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Raster images (which is what Photoshop works on) are stored as pixels. The more pixels, the larger the file size. The ppi (pixels per inch) affects how the image appears on paper. By increasing this number, the pixels get smaller when printed. However, changing this number does not affect the number of pixels. If you have a 1920 x 1080 pixel image, the ...


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If you're using a set amount of pixels, let's say 500 x 500, it won't matter whether you're using 300 ppi or 72 ppi because the amount pixels in the image would still be 500. If you wan't to lower the file size of your image you will either need to scale down the image or save the image in a lower quality format: Or use Save for Web as this can give you ...


1

In this specific case vectorization is not just easy its brain dead easy. Just: paste image in illustrator hit the live trace adjust live trace settings to 4 colors and set path fitting to 0 px Ignore white on expand object -> path -> simplify Angle threshold to 90 Straight lines. Now there is only one kink in the darker of the two transparent areas ...


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Alright the lazy way: Open the first screenshot with the white background in photoshop. Magic Wand on White Delete Delete the Background Layer Save For Web End result with the History showing: I suspect you can do this in Fireworks too but I never touch that. I agree with others though that doing this in Illustrator as vector would be a better option. ...


0

Duplicate the entire group of objects. On the duplicate set, make all the squares 100% opaque and change to color to black, leaving the white stroke. (You can simply add a blend of color overlay). Add a full-white layer below for easier alignment, then flatten all the layers of the duplicate set along with the new white layer. You should now have a black ...


3

Your best bet is to use your current work as a guide and recreate the squares using opaque colors. This will also alleviate your intersecting problem. Create guides around your squares. Create squares using the selector or shape tool (vector might give you longer mileage)


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Google Play Store wants PNG24 not PNG8 "JPEG or 24-bit PNG (no alpha)" https://support.google.com/googleplay/android-developer/answer/1078870?hl=en auto formatting from PNG8 to 24 can cause issues like that. Try saving as PNG24 :D


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For starters, I have an iPad but find iOS tedious compared to Android. I mostly use my Nexus tablet in it's place. That said, they can basically serve the same purpose. Sketching A lot of people I know play around with sketching on their tablet. For me, it's not as productive as paper sketches that get captured into Evernote when they're ready (more on ...


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Adobe NAV can be useful if you are capable of changing your current workflow. With Adobe Nav — a companion app to Adobe Photoshop CS5 software (version 12.0.4 or later required) — you can now instantly transfer images from your iPad directly to Photoshop CS5 and use your iPad to browse and select open Photoshop documents and activate Photoshop tools. As ...


3

Interesting question! I use it for a few tasks. Sketching. This has been covered well the other answers. Personally, I'm a fan of Paper for doing wireframe sketching. Second screen. AirDisplay is an app that let's you use your iPad as a second screen for your MacBook. It works over WiFi. Slick. My portfolio. My portfolio is a PDF that I load on the iPad ...


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I sketch a great deal... Prefer Adobe Ideas, Sketchbook Pro, Layers apps, and Pencil for that. I explore web site wireframes..... iMockups app. I'll, on occasion, do a little coding (nothing complex though) ... Codea app. I write notes... Draftpad app. I explore color... MyPantone app. I accept credit card payments.. Square Register app. I track my ...


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iPad apps can have very great focused/niche purpose, the appsfollowing have made it into my workflow. iDraw: geometric hands on designs with shapes, great for wireframing, on the go or in the office. Sketchbook Pro: Great for painting. Adobe Ideas: Sketching thumbs and production illustration. Sprite Something: Go to for pixel art creation I found a ...


2

If you are an illustrator or love sketching Adobe has an app for the iPad, havent tested yet but worth a shot: Adobe Ideas – Vector drawing and illustration and it is free. There was an article on drawing apps from Creative Blog that you might find as a good read titled: "20 best iPad art apps for painting and sketching" Tayasui Sketches ASKetch Inspire ...


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Depends on what you media is, as there are several apps out there for sketching and painting. I have seen some hyper-realistic paintings done using only an iPad. But for me, I think the iPad serves better as just a productivity tool. I can think of a hundred other types of media I would rather use for designing, painting, and sketching rather than an ...


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I don't use my iPad for actual designing. It is a great tool, however, to have at hand when doing an interview or just a get-together with a (potential) customer. Note-taking is fast and always legible later, and I like the ease with which I can browse the 'net for examples of web design. And, of course, testing whether my websites display properly on the ...


0

It's a very simple shape - just recreate it in Illustrator color it the green color you need and export in any format/size needed.


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To help you think on the right terms, consider an analogy: A text document on a computer versus a sheet of printed paper. When I have a text file open on my computer, I can make whatever change I want. However, once I print, the text on that paper is unchangeable. A JPEG image is made of rows of pixels. Apart from some metadata that can give us some ...


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The only way to edit any text within a JPG is to paint over it and retype whatever text you wish to replace it. There is no way to alter text as text within a JPG file.


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It ultimately depends on how the color functions within the overall branding and if you are allowed to use variants. Usually you should be presented with all the acceptable branding guidelines, if you are not ask for them. I fall all else fails you should be allowed to use the black or white version of the logo, all logos should have a black and or white ...


3

Do I need to use the logo colors at all? Certainly not. You want to create a good logo and a good website, both having some element of recogniseability. You can use logo colours, or you can choose not to. One thing to consider though that will help make it "hang toghether" is to use a version of logo colours in the web design. For example the same ...


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The logo, and by extension, its colour(s), are the base of a brand and its recognisability. So yes, by default, you use the logo colours. The only case in which I could imagine not doing so is if you'd design a colourless, minimalist site that heavily emphasises the logo's shape and typography. Not using a logo's colours will cause a disparity in the ...


2

GRAIN is used by photo manipulation softwares such as Photoshop Lightroom to mimic film grain. And it's a very good way to bring back a sense of texture and sharpness to an image suffering from NOISE. Especially if the de-noising tools are used. When well used, grain can greatly repair a noisy picture and make it a very nice one. Used on a too-much-scaled ...


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For these kind of tutorials lynda.com is a great resource as you can choose a course aimed at your designated skill level. Here is a good introduction course to GIMP: http://www.lynda.com/course-tutorials/GIMP-Essential-Training/112673-2.html Scan through the course subjects on the left to ensure it covers the elements you need. Alternatively a free ...


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Any graphics software will help you produce those. There will be a learning curve associated with them, but if you intend to keep working on these it's worth investing your time in it. Free options are The Gimp and Inkscape. Inkscape deals with vector graphics, so I'd definitely recommend it! For paid options you have Photoshop (bitmap) and Illustrator ...


1

You won't create mockups like these with InDesign. For this kind of work I would recommend using one of the many available Photoshop templates, because the time and expense of creating something from scratch is beyond the budget of most small projects like this. You can find a large number of mockup templates, both commercial (but inexpensive) or free, by ...


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For free you're going to want to look into Gimp. You don't entirely create the book model. You find a royalty free version you can either license or is available under an applicable open license. Then bring that into Gimp and edit the front cover and spine. That will be a lot easier for you than trying to draw a book and pages from scratch.


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Here is a list of free graphic software. Brochures and eBooks are typically InDesign territory, so look for an equivalent of that. Scribus seems to be a popular one, although I've never used it myself. Related discussion here


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Adobe InDesign has some very limited illustration capabilities via the Pen Tool and the Shape Tool and Direct Selection Tool. Unfortunately it is not suited to creating anything more than basic geometric shapes and very simple wordmark based logos. Ideally you would use Adobe Illustrator to create logos and vector based images and you would bring them into ...



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