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23

There's also the aesthetic side to it. I am and have always been a PC user. However, I still have to admit that OS X and Mac hardware have always been better designed from an aesthetic standpoint than Windows/PC. Designers naturally gravitate towards beautiful designs. And since we all draw inspiration from our environment and absorb influences from the ...


23

graphics designers prefer Macs over PCs for accomplishing their tasks. I was wondering, why is this? I think it's dangerous to make this generalization, but it seems to ring true to a lot of people. I think there are a lot of nuances and history behind this but it all sort of boils down to the obvious. Graphic designers appreciate good design. ...


18

I'm primarily a web developer and designer, so I do most of my work directly in Photoshop/Gimp cutting and clipping and filtering. I eventually stumbled upon the opportunity to purchase a very inexpensive reconditioned Dell Latitude XT, and my experience has been pretty positive. It allows me to much more easily create masks, draw layers, make my selections, ...


11

Couple months back I bought myself Wacom Intuos4 (Large - A4 size) and I absolutely love it. For photo editing in Photoshop, it's huge difference. It will allow you to a lot of things which just aren't possible with mouse, which is basically any manual editing. My biggest issue while working with Photoshop was, that I just didn't like the way I had to ...


8

Funny as it may sound, I've heard nothing but good about Wacom's Bamboo tablet, which is in the $100-200 range. Other than that, I've seen people offer used previous-generation Intuos tablets in that range before as well.


7

I do not think that nowadays it is particularly true any more about Mac better than PC for graphic design. You do not have to have a Mac to be a Graphic Designer. PC & MAC have same potential in software and hardware. I love and hate both, and use both for various things. In past where 2 factors to make you choose the mac: There were software ...


6

Don't buy netbooks/laptops, they aren't built to last as long as normal desktop pcs and can be more expensive for half the power. To counter the power outage problem (I had the same thing in Bulgaria) buy a UPS system for each machine. Two 23' monitors might be a luxury, but I'd say at least 21'. In my office I have one 23 and two 21, they offer a lot of ...


5

I agree, wacom bamboo. But be sure to pick the so labelled "medium"(I think, not sure, is A5, and small is A6(the larger the number, the smaller size)) , not the "small" ones. Here the size does matter. It does have direct relation with fluid and good stroke. I rather prefer the Intuos gamma, and XL or L formats, (even being pricey) but that's me. Beware, ...


5

I have a project that does just this. (With a slightly different model tablet). See here . The steps include: installing four pieces of custom software on the main Windows PC: a virtual network serial port, an alternate Wacom driver, a VNC server, and a batch file to simplify connection. replacing the operating system of the tablet PC with a custom .ISO ...


4

I work at a graphics intensive design agency. Unfortunately, design tablets are not seen as essential hardware. Nobody here uses them, but I'm sure if I made the case that my speed and efficiency would improve with one, then a purchase may be made. It depends entirely on the agency, but at the same time it depends entirely on the user.


4

That;s going to depend on the company. While it's by no means unheard of it's not what a typical office manager at a typical (non-creative type office) would see as a normal computer peripheral, so you may have to make a case for having your office purchase it. If you're working at a very graphics-intensive shop, however, it probably would be considered ...


4

Significant or not really depends on the user but the intuos4 certainly has changed a bit since its previous version. increased sensibility (2048 levels instead of previously 1024) I'm not noticing this much. But might be just my blunt nature. The design and button layout has changed a lot. Now it is useable for both left and right handed people. The ...


4

Bamboo is pretty good, and a brand new one is within your price range. I'd also suggest checking out your local Craigslist for a used Intuos3.


4

Probably a Mac user would have a better opinion, but from the 'outside' its seems like Macs more consistently deliver high quality experience. The hardware is damn attractive and the OS (from limited experience) is more consistent at giving you information you need and hiding information you don't (though Windows 7 was a huge improvement Microsoft). Hardware ...


4

A part of my answer is also included in: What computer hardware matters to a graphic designer? I look mostly at screen-resolution (the higher the better, although not for reading) Decent amount of RAM Consider batterylife vs performance (CPU and GPU) and weight. I work freelance and typically a few days in a row with daily commutes. So I work at a lot of ...


3

I would recommend a 3D mouse instead of tablet. I have both and 3D mouse is better for 3D applications such as Autocad. Check out some options: http://www.3dconnexion.com/ In this case (as a gift), consider their SpaceNavigator which is an affordable model.


3

The setup with which I'm most familiar is that everyone works over a network — all the workstations in the office can access the network machine, which has a gihugic drive, and everything is saved there. This way everyone in the office is working on the same file, and there's no worry that the most recent version was saved to so-and-so's hard drive. ...


3

I have a cheap graphic tablet that works reasonably well on Windows 7 and earlier on Vista. My problem was not the functionality of the tablet but trying to use the stylus while looking at the monitor. I found that personally a tablet PC was much easier to use. I like the iPad but without a stylus, it may be no good for serious graphic design. My own ...


3

I don't tend to find it terribly useful unless I'm actually doing something requiring that kind of input. I mean, it doesn't have to be an actual illustration, but that kind of fine grained input. Really just the kinds of things you'd expect. When I'm doing those kinds of things, though, I definitely prefer it to a mouse. I used an old wacom that I've had a ...


3

My personal opinion would be to keep two copies. Whether you store them locally, or on a external hard drive; having two copies in two different locations helps back-up your data. That way if one hard drive should die, the other one will retain all the files. While I have no experience working with design studios, I would suspect it could be for a number of ...


3

Always get a Wacom. Other brands are just not worth it. The construction is shoddier, and they usually have big unwieldy batteries in the pen. Wacoms on the other hand are practically indestructible. My first tablet was purchased in highschool, and I kept using it until I had to replace it in grad school because my new computer no longer had a serial port. ...


3

I've been using a 16,4" laptop for a bit over 2 years now. What I considered for the purchase of my system were my typical working conditions. In my case: I needed my own computer I had to be able to work in different locations No workplace I was going to work in, was going to have a dedicated workstation. So I could not rely on getting more than ...


3

From user experience, I would not recommend to use metaphors in specialized software. Users need to be concentrated on specific tasks and metaphors require some mental work which can be distracting. For sure, people can addict to anything and don't pay attention anymore, but I think more "clear" icons will increase usability.


2

When doing comic, or a line art drawing/illustration, I would recommend better larger graphic tablets, but indeed for good control in that specific task, (and is not because I draw since 30 years in pencil an paper: In my profession(comic artist/illustrator, game artist, designer) I needed to draw zillions of artworks with all sort of Wacoms) you need ...


2

Two things to add to what everyone else has already said: As the questioner says, people tend to instinctively love tablets or hate them. For a lot of people who don't take to them, the problem stems from the disconnect between the hand and the screen. Until recently, the only alternative to this was the very expensive Wacom Cintiq range, but if you're ...


2

I am not sure where to start here, as you say, you are not looking for a "Professional" tool, so your idea of what works for you will be different from others. I recommend that you go ahead and buy the machine you are looking at and give it a try, it will be great if it works for you, and if it doesn't you can re-sell it again quickly and get most if not ...


2

Just add to @Daniel Hanly's and @lawndartcatcher's excellent answers... If you are considering bringing in your own, you will want to check with your company's IT department, or whomever holds responsibility for computer integrity, because plugging in your own kit may be a violation of company policy.


2

I have had some success in using an older pen based Tablet PC to act as a digitizer for a Windows 7 desktop. The method here shares the tablet PC's inbuilt wacom digitizer over the network as a virtual serial port, thus the desktop recognizes it as a digitizer tablet. VNC is then used to push the display back to the tablet PC (which is then scaled) creating ...


2

I believe the posts referencing "professional" equipment may be a realistic expectation, based on the work being produced. The complexity of projects I accept is heavily dependent on my equipment. In my day job I publish high-quality, hard-bound books. I run a MacPro3,1 from 2008 with two four core 3.0GHz Xeons (8 cores total), 24GB RAM, a 128GB ...


2

I can't work with only a laptop. In fact, I can't get much done on a laptop at all other than general project management and communications. And that really has little to do with eyesight or anything physical. I simply feel like I'm working on a post it note and can only do so much. A laptop is livable with a second monitor connected and a WACOM tablet ...



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