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85

They do. The thing is, you probably don't realise, because upper case numbers have been all you've been using or seeing. There is a distinction between 'default' numbers and 'oldstyle' numbers. The default numbers we all know are the actual capitals, with the 'oldstyle' numbers (sometimes incorrectly called 'proportional numbers') are lowercase. Fonts tend ...


25

While upper case numbers do exist, as is shown in vincents answer. They did not originally exist at all. Remember our numbers are copied from the muslim scientists, who wrote in Arabic. Arabic is unicase, that is all letters are same case. So the notion of big and small numbers is a later development. Since the original system had no case so did the adopted ...


23

Here are a couple of great resources that explain the origin of the hamburger menu: Who Designed the Hamburger Icon? & A Brief History of the Hamburger Icon . As the articles state, the original designer is a man named Norm Cox who designed it for the Xerox "Star" personal workstation.


22

I've always interpreted this as a more literal reference to the possession that "stealing" implies. If you've truly stolen something, then it is no longer owned by anyone else. Nor is it a copy. It's owned by you. There's the old saying that "possession is 9/10 of the law". Steal your inspiration, and own the results. I don't think anyone has truly ...


16

Einstein said "The key to originality is hiding your sources". You're right, it's a concept that's been commented on by many great artists, the concept though I think is less literal than you're reading it. I think it's about originality. The idea is that there are no truly original thoughts and thus there is no truly original creation, everyone is ...


16

Capital letters exist as our written and printed language has decided they should. The rules for usage of capital letters typically is for starting sentences and proper nouns. The rules simply don't apply to numerals. Hence, no need for there to be 'upper case' numbers. Your example of using ALL CAPS TO SHOW EMPHASIS is actually not an ideal way to show ...


14

After some digging, I found it is called a catchword. Read more about it here: http://english.stackexchange.com/questions/65963/in-old-books-why-is-the-first-word-of-the-next-page-printed-at-the-bottom-of-th I always assumed this was to improve readability, as the reader could continue more seamlessly onto the following page, but it turns out it was also ...


11

Logos would be done with paste-up: text might be created using a linotype or phototypesetting machine. I personally used a machine that had fonts on wheels approx 12" in diameter which you rotated and selected individual characters using a footswitch. This exposed the type on a strip of photopaper and at the end, you'd had a line of text which you would ...


11

(BTW - nuns also made illuminated manuscripts...) Very interesting question. I have studied old manuscripts for years, and there are a few things to keep in mind; either as explanations or as interesting anomalies. I think a general history of illuminated manuscripts might also be interesting, but that would be a different question. Vellum and ...


10

I tend to keep everything digital. When floppys died I moved everything to Zip disks. When Zip disks died I moved everything to a hard drive. (considered moving to Jaz drives but was wary of yet another external format at the time) When CDs started to fade, I moved all CD content to hard drives. Primarily because by that time hard drives grew 10x+ ...


9

The long s 'ſ' can be found in many blackletter fonts, but the r rotunda 'ꝛ' seems to be very rare. There are several blackletter fonts by Peter Wiegel (Cat Fonts) that contain both glyphs and are for free: Rotunda Pommerania Berthold Mainzer Frkatur UNZ1A Blankenburg UNZ1A Fette UNZ Fraktur Schwaben UNZ1A Of these, Rotunda Pommerania comes closest to ...


9

What is case? The discussion both in this question and in the one it inspired on ELU seems to conflate two distinct meanings of ‘uppercase’ and ‘lowercase’: Based purely on shape and size, originating in whether a glyph was originally usually stored in the typographer’s upper or lower case (= drawer). Based on functionality, describing what upper- and ...


7

A storage room full of vertical files. Vertical files full of photomechanical transfers, paste up boards, sizes and sizes of photostats, type sheets. These took up rooms, often warehouses to store if the agency was a bigger agency. Then Pantone chip definitions and swatches. This is were Pantone was born and blew up. A color system which was consistent ...


7

For a little background, the reason I originally posted this question was to provide some space to answer a comment on another answer of mine. The issue revolved around pairing fonts with Helvetica and I proposed looking to structurally and historically related faces: namely the clarendons. It seems odd at first but, if you trace Helvetica's lineage (and ...


6

To add a bit more: What was their inspiration/model? It was part of the international style of Swiss typography (the "International style" or "Swiss style"), and is an example of a 'Grotesk' (Grotesque) sans serif (Germanic 'Grotesks' are sometimes associated with a more geometric approach than US/UK 'Grotesques'). It's a movement associated with crisp ...


6

But what was their inspiration/model? What era were they trying to envoke, if any? Haas set out to design a new sans-serif typeface that could compete with the successful Akzidenz-Grotesk in the Swiss market. And was there a predecessor to their inspiration that might provide a better understanding of this family? Originally called Neue Haas ...


6

Funnily enough, design blog CreativeBloq published a list recently titled "The 10 best movies about design": (actually, just realised these are pretty much all feature length documentaries, or documentary-like. Technically they're still movies I think but the question seems to ask for fiction films. Oh well, I'll leave it here anyway) Why Man Creates, ...


6

The CSS font-weight is influenced by Linotype numbering system. As you can learn from the wiki, every digit in the number describes different characteristic of the typeface and from this point CSS adopted Lynotype in part... The 100 to 900 system works for some fonts, but fails for other, thus you should always check this in advance before using particular ...


5

Linotype made it to CSS over Panose system partly because of licensing concerns. See http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/PANOSE. The Panose number is used in TrueType, OpenType and SVG fonts and contains infromation about weight, proportion, contrast etc. The Panose weight number is more or less the same system as the Linotype/CSS. From very light to extra black. ...


5

Asterism - ⁂ - "[U]sed to 'indicate minor breaks in text,' call attention to a passage, or to separate sub-chapters in a book." Currency Symbol - ¤ - "[U]sed to denote a currency when the symbol for the particular currency is unavailable." Interrobang - ‽ - "[U]sed in various written languages and intended to combine the functions of the question ...


5

Normally, "Black" is used to mark the heaviest (boldest) variant of a font. Or, they use a number scheme, usually running from 100 (lightest) to 900 (heaviest). So, I'd expect Neuzeit Grotesk Black to be the heaviest variant: http://www.myfonts.com/fonts/urw/neuzeit-grotesk/t-black/ The 'grotesk' part of the name simply refers to the stylistic family of ...


5

Not sure if this is a good fit for SE, as it'd take a lot of work to make an exhaustive list, but I'll give it a go... Breakthroughs in web design (not sure these all fit your definition of 'design trend' but they certainly influence what was done visually.) (In very roughly chronological order...) the invention of the web (Tim Berners-Lee) Mosaic (first ...


5

You have a few things that you need to be concerned about preserving. When we talk about digital preservation, we typically are concerned with: The physical media. This is handled through what's called a 'media refresh', typically done every 5-10 years, depending on the type of media. You read everything off of the older media, validate it against the ...


4

You may want to focus your topic into the concept of information design, which is where graphic deign splits off from just being about making something look pretty to highlighting the information that is important to people. One starting point might be to look at the Nudge blog where occasionally they highlight how design can "nudge" people into making ...


4

I am no expert, and I was not a student in the seventies, but I do remember some of the political upheavals, social and cultural currents and events. Design is informed, develop in tandem with, or as a reaction against, politics and the happenings in society in general. Yes, there was definitely a good deal of sixties hippy aesthetics around in the ...


4

What you are looking for, is a Blackletter or Gothic font, such as these: They span from the medieval to the renaissance, but are probably generally seen as being medieval rather than renaissance. There are hundreds of fonts like these, you will find a lot here and here. The Renaissance was roughly from the 14th to the 17th century, but Renaissance ...


4

You can't easily preserve digital files for a few reasons: physical media becomes outdated software becomes out dated systems to run said outdated software becomes outdated Not that you shouldn't back up data, of course. 'The Cloud' makes this a little easier in regards to the physical media issue. You still have the other two issues, though. For ...


3

iTunes has a similar feature that sums up genres nicely:


3

"Most attractive" is a pretty hard question to answer, but if you want to emulate a range of styles in a movie poster, you're in luck because movie posters tend to follow a range of clichés. FontShop has a blog called the FontFeed, and they have a large archive of posts where they review movie posters. Read ten of 'em in succession and you'll start to see ...


3

The only films I can think of are Milton Glaser: To Inform and Delight and Design & Thinking. Google turns up this link on Creativebloq.com. And this is probably the best film every designer should watch. (John Cleese on Creativity) As far as I know all films about design are classified as documentaries. If they aren't documentaries, they are ...



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