Tag Info

New answers tagged

2

Just read this article. It explains everything: https://css-tricks.com/rgba-browser-support/ You should have: div { background: rgba(0, 0, 0, 0.5); color: #fff; } There are also same or similar questions here, like this: http://stackoverflow.com/questions/15449280/html-css-text-background-transparent-but-text-not


1

It's true that image resolution is meaningless on the web. What determines how images are sized is the overall pixel dimensions of the images at whatever screen resolution of the display device. But for the purposes of judging pixel distance for web design, if you set your image in Photoshop to 72 dpi, it should give you a one-to-one relationship between ...


3

There isn't necessarily a direct correlation between pixel measurements in Photoshop and how CSS works in the browser. In other words, if you need 32px of space on your page, you may have to go with something like 28px to account for margin or padding on another element. In general, it's best to design things 'loose' so things can have a few pixels give and ...


1

You can try litmus for testing your email. This supports a lot of clients including apple watch. here is the list of supported clients. Mailchimp uses litmus to render messages. EMAIL CLIENTS Apple Mail 8 Apple Mail 7 Lotus Notes 8.5 Lotus Notes 8 Lotus Notes 7 Lotus Notes 6.5 Thunderbird AOL Mail * Gmail * Google Apps * Yahoo! Mail * Outlook ...


1

I would output at full size and use width:100% and let the browser do the pixel perfect rendering. You can only control so much. If it's that rigid and cannot be scaled, center top left or something and work the design to it.


2

You will simply have to zoom and pan, unless you want to invest in a better monitor. Not directed at you: I find it somewhat hilarious that anyone would ever design a site at 1800px wide. To me that's a clear sign of someone that has little clue about real world usage.



Top 50 recent answers are included