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Icons are used to overcome language barriers. By inserting a word in an icon you have just removed this function.


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Icons are made to not include text within it for many reasons. First, Icons could be smaller and any text in it could be hard to read Second, Icons are made to relate and connect a certain function with well know visual representation to man mind, without thinking or even reading. Third, what would you do when somebody in other country wants to localize ...


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I can not tell you how to do that with photoshop or other programs (I do not use them), but I think I can explain your your "feeling": If you compare the arrow with text history you see the sharp lines and corners? The other part of the logo is build with round corners. So try a font and an arrow that uses rounded corners too. Update: Comparing both ...


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A list of fonts that support the Unicode Currency Symbols Block, which contains currency symbols not part of more general blocks (i.e. Basic Latin that contains $ or Latin-1 that contains £) can be found here: Font Support for Unicode Block 'Currency Symbols' A list of all unicode currency symbols can be seen here—from which you can see which blocks ...


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Its better to use ASCII or Unicode, because this fonts or character are already built-in in most of the operating systems that we have today and it has a standard so you don't have problem rendering them in most software you are using. Unicode is a way that a user can insert special characters on a computer and we are doing it even in applications like ...


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It's sensible to use characters, not a font. What if the font doesn't work somewhere? This caught my grandmother out when she wrote her book. She used a font for hebrew characters, and this font didn't print out - so some random letters were used instead. Instead, you should use the unicode characters. This page has them all, and a selection are below: ...


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I think you are misunderstanding. Google's Material Design (which is no bible—but correct in this case) says not to distort an existing icon. The Windows logo incorporates a perceived perspective but it is never distorted. To illustrate my point—The Windows logo without any distortion: The Windows logo distorted: Using distorted shapes to create a ...


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There is a difference between distorting an existing icon and designing your own icon from scratch and deciding that the distortion is part of the design. Google is warning you against the former, but no-one can or should stop you from doing the latter. Lots, if not all, style guides of brands and logos prohibit the distortion of an icon or logo. Rightfully ...



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