Tag Info

New answers tagged

0

The commonality between the units in this case is that they are normally both defined over a scale. Short distances are measured with a ruler, that has a scale from one end to the other Large distances with a scale on a map Thermometers have a scale on them too. I would therefore show some kind of graduated scale.


3

Double-headed arrow. 16px version: 100px version for clarity: Different style, 16px: 100px:


1

For t you can combine all three symbols in one icon, or alternatively create 3 icons - each one is activated when proper scale is chosen: Probably it is better to separate t and l to two different icon/options


1

You can use this for inspiration: http://thenounproject.com/search/?q=musician One of my favourite icon collections website =) They have huge amount of ideas for different icons =)


1

Use of 2 different icon for musician and music artist will be a good option, you can design something like this.


3

I've seen this represented by an outline of an artist holding a mic. Depending on what your userbase will be like, you could have more fun with it, like maybe an outline of someone holding a guitar, a concert pianist, etc.


1

You could somehow add a microphone to the icon, or notes maybe a portion of a music score.


1

I very recently made a music logo, but for a different purpose (business, website and app). I think I can add some things I picked up during the whole process. I went through maybe 20 iterations, and the last iteration included rebuilding it and incorporating the Golden Ratio into it as much as I could, it actually pulled off the effect I was imagining much ...


0

Google use a capital A underlined and italicised in Gmail - - but I wouldn't recommend that. Even after months of frequent use I still end up puzzled looking at every icon every time I need formatting options: I'm just not ever looking for an underlined italic A when I'm looking to change formatting. So my suggested workflow would start with what people ...


7

The benefit of having your full name in a logo is that, well, your name is the logo. Nike has the benefit of spending hundreds of millions of dollars to train the public to know that a "swoosh" = Nike, but you don't have that luxury. Not yet, anyways! While using initials or symbols in logos can sometimes lead to more creative solutions or more distinctive ...


2

this question is like "how should my logo look like?" my advice would be to hire a designer/design studio to do it for you or just start start sketching all of your ideas out. there is little reason to choose a text only logo before sketching out all of the above. Also look at what other bands/music makers have in their style and maybe try to fit in.


1

{CSS} inside a document icon is the representation most often used for changes to a stylesheet. If your goal is to simply represent "style" an "Aa" icon is most often used. However you may also consider using an artist palette as older versions of windows programs would use this.


0

Either of the icons you suggested will work; it sounds like the problem is that users might not immediately associate the icon with their score. You can fix that by putting the icon in the game's UI, next to the score as the users are earning points. That way by the time they arrive at the scoreboard, they've already associated your chosen icon with their ...


0

A knife sticking in the table would be ideal because as soon as there is one entry on the leaderboard your users will intuitively understand that the number underneath the icon must be the number of taps on the screen.


-1

Icon is better, that letter like "F" (in facebook) is a icon, mind sees as a image


2

I think depends on strength of a brand. Icons - images are much more recognizable for eye because they are complex. But thats just visuality. I don't think just letters are good representation a especially if its a small brand. There is only finite number of letters and their shapes. But for big brands i think it works because... well they are everywhere ...


-1

In Photoshop you have to select the shape you wanted to delete some of the area. Make sure the Direct Selection Tool is active. Then create the shape you wanted to intersect on the shape, then select subtract from path operations as for your question. There are other options like: Combine, Subtract, Intersect and Exclude


0

Ensure your document is 8-bit RGB. (Image > Mode) If that doesn't help, hold down the Option/alt key and choose File > Save as... this will save a copy and remove any non-png allowed formatting. Chances are there's simply something about the image which is not allowed in the PNG format. However, using File > Save for Web should allow PNG saving in ...


1

The 2 main answers to this problem are: 1) Recreate your file as an RGB and copy all your old layers over to this new file. 2) As Adobe STAFF has said, you may have deleted some important files by mistake requiring a reinstall of Photoshop https://forums.adobe.com/thread/1311499


0

You could also select both and make it a compound path. Select both with smaller form on top Object -> Compound Path -> Make Shortcut: Ctrl+8


1

Per Google after a little search: Things not permitted: Don't copy or imitate Google's trade dress, including the look and feel of Google web design properties or Google brand packaging, distinctive color combinations, typography, graphic designs, product icons, or imagery associated with Google. Source


0

Paper Plane font from 'Entypo' Picto gram Suite.


0

What about an icon representing a diary? It fits most of the feelings you're trying to evoke. It might be hard making it look like a diary rather than just a book, but it's a starting point at least!


0

Finding cursors I'm sure that a simple search could pull up many free cursor sites. The first site in the linked result, Open Cursor Library, seems fairly extensive to me. I'm sure that you should have little trouble if what you want is to use cursors. Creating cursors If you want to design your own cursors instead, you could surely open Photoshop or Gimp ...


0

Since SVG files are the one I needed the most, OpenClipart had some good images that look good for my purposes. As member Rachuru suggested, iconfinder did the job for icons. I have upvoted both answers, but will accept Rachuru's because iconfinder helped me to find icons I needed. I have posted this answer just in case someone else needs free SVG images. ...


0

An alternate technique is to just draw, then export to a decently high-resolution file which is a multiple of the desired pixel resolution (288 or 576 ppi), then reduce the pixel file to the proper resolution in PhotoShop using Bicubic Sharper (Best for Reduction).


1

Window → Arrange → New Window for document-name will do precisely what you’re after in Adobe Photoshop. Window → New Window will do precisely what you’re after in Adobe Illustrator. Many other Adobe apps can also spawn new windows of the same file. If you’re using Sketch, Sketch Mirror might do what you want, if you have an iPad handy.


0

I think you have to design these icons using a pixel-snap grid. You have to set the grid (and units) and the document settings. Try to follow this -old- article: http://petshopboxstudio.com/blog/articles/how-to-prepare-illustrator-for-pixel-perfection/


1

If I understand correctly, your actual icon should be 96 by 96 pixels with a transparent padding that adds up to 128 by 128 pixels. First of all, what you did in the second step was reduce the size of the green background of your logo. I assume you want to keep the full logo without actually reducing its background. First, open your logo as it is, 128x128 ...


0

If I am understanding your question correctly you need to make sure to have Use Artboards: File -> Export -> Use Artboards This was also on Stacked awhile ago: "Keep original size when export image from illustrator"


6

You can do this really easily in CS6 or later by applying a gradient to a stroke with a rounded end cap. I've circled the relevant appearance settings below: Older versions of Illustrator do not have the ability to apply gradients to strokes. If you don't have CS6+, you can an art brush instead. Follow the same technique described here (replace the ...


2

Curly braces in many programming languages denote a block of code. The practice can be traced back to BCPL, before that you would see stuff like: Begin ... End So the braces is a sort of shorthand for lot of code lives here. So it makes sense to say {Code} in some situations. The less than greater than is derived from SGML and its predecessors. Its ...



Top 50 recent answers are included