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37

It's interesting, but (I assume) It's really the three dots that is the tie into 'TRItium'. As such, I'd consider dumping both the circle and the hexagon. They seem superfluous to the concept. They are nice, but (and this is just my opinion) in the world of software, those tend to give off a bit of a video game vibe--which may or may not be your objective. ...


21

I suggest ditching the hexagon, as it adds no value. If anything, it's confusing. In chemistry, the first thought that comes to mind when I see a hexagon is "benzene ring". That's not what you wanted to draw, right? The alternate version of the hexagon, with oddly aligned edges, is completely disconcerting to me.


19

Okay others have good points, I would like to add a new one. The logo is size challenged in that the details are a bit too small. This may be a problem if you need to: work in small scales such as 24 x 24 pixel icons (or even smaller) Print a business card sized medium, you would now need the ring to be quite big for the dots to be visible. I think the ...


18

Mi opinion: Use the atom as a secondary asset only. Your last sample, the website with the type alone, is great. The colors are interesting, the word and its shape as well. The straight lines work, especially if you try for example with the atom in the background -see image below-. I see it and sort of get more both the speech ('soft') and engine ...


18

I'm thinking keep it simple, and concentrate on the typography. Tritium is a radioactive isotope of hydrogen with 3 nucleons. So maybe use two of the nucleons for the 'i's' and one 'floater': As Tritium is radioactive it decays, and so does the typography. Loose quick sketch but you get the idea. Logo should work at most sizes, with spacing adjustment ...


9

I think the only real con is your limited color space. And that isn't necessarily a huge con... Some great designers have embraced the photocopier. One that comes to mind is Art Chantry who, IMHO, is just as responsible for the Seattle Grunge scene as Nirvana was: http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Art_Chantry Granted, that's a particular aesthetic that may ...


8

Not sure that the Hexagon in the BG is of much help and it might be just ruining the effort that u have put in. How about removing the BG Hexagon and just the three circles that can now be increased in size and used in the center of the circle. That would look way better. I am just attaching an image that is more close to what I am saying and that way it ...


7

To me, a logo is a simple graphic 'device' which identifies a brand. A brand will only have a single logo (possibly with a small number of variants for different media or 'sub brands'). A brand to me is a much broader thing, encompassing the feel of a company from a customer's perspective. For example, a company like IBM has a brand which is very 'serious'. ...


7

Look and feel is a brand thing Your visual decisions should not only be based on information architecture but an essence, a personality that's unique the brand in question. Your first steps should have nothing to do with execution. No type, colors, images, graphics. That will come later as a logical extension of the brand. Start with Demographics ...


7

That said is it bad to assume in re-branding that people would go to the site to fill out a contact form? Yes. I have found it a mistake to assume the preferred method of communication from any client. I have clients that I've never personally spoken to and everything is handled via email. I have clients who will send an email then call to see if I ...


7

Obviously the sharper the transition the better - but sometimes compromises are needed. I was working at an organisation that had this exact issue. They were large, very budget-conscious organisation with lots of very varied branded products with very varied stock turnaround, and a new brand that was maybe 40% similar to the old brand. They did it in a ...


5

I agree with 200_success about ditching the hexagon because it adds no value...and am also unsure how Tritium relates to a speech-synthesis engine as Scott points out. However, I like the atom graphic (which I think is clean & simple but interesting, particularly with the bit of incongruity that the electron adds); and I will assume for the moment that ...


5

The word «TRITIUM» is so cool. No need for an aditional Graphicmark. Focus on superprecise typography instead (like in the website mockup).


5

I have a different take on the subject. The logo should communicate something about the product, not the product's name (I am giggling at the thought of a Microsoft logo of an itty bitty pillow). The product is a speech synthesis program. I get that tritium is a chemistry based word and I like the sound of it, but speech synthesis has nothing to do with ...


5

I think that in an ideal world you would dispose/recycle the old materials and rollout new ones at once but this isn't an ideal world. I would also say that there's actually three types of companies in this class: Mega corporations Large companies Small businesses I would imagine only the large companies would be able to afford to dispose of their ...


5

It really depends on many factors, such as the industry the company is in, the reason behind the brand refresh and various others. Putting myself in the rather comfortable shoes of a CEO, I would immediately discount Option A for any company with a marketing budget less than at least $20 million, and even then writing it off would cost 5% of the budget. ...


4

What would I go over? Selection of font for a brand? Colour palette? Yes. Typography color spacing positioning movement Line Shape Mass texture Balance Proximity Consistency Contrast Once all of that is considered, you then must consider the technical aspects of output. Output aspects can vary. Essentially, you are asking how to be a designer. ...


4

that is some serious ink coverage there. As such, your printer is probably going to want you to go with a thicker paper stock to begin with. Coated would help as well. Bottom line, though, is that this is a question for your printer. They will guide you through the process based on the ink coverage and paper style you want. Do keep in mind that the paper ...


4

Corporate identity is one of those vaguely defined, hodge-podge ideas that grows in scope as more consultants from different disciplines try to mark out their own piece of the market. From a designer's viewpoint, "identity" is all the ways people identify the company visually: how it looks to the world. A common misconception, particularly among owners of ...


4

Leonardo Da Vinci was the pinnacle of art, design and science of his time. Thinking along those lines, objects that are similar to being a nice combination of the three, assuming authority, could be the wonders of the world, especially the pyramids. The pyramids represent an interesting idea since the three sides which coincides with your three criteria as ...


4

Yes. In general, any materials which leave the clients' office should be branded, that includes forms. Some alteration from a letterhead may be required to fulfill the requirements of the form, but the same elements should be present - identity and contact information. In some cases, I've designed two letterheads - A primary letterhead for most usage, ...


4

Wow, I feel your pain. Been there. Whether you present the additional work depends entirely on the kind of relationship you have with the client. If this is a new or casual client, not someone you can speak with bluntly, just prepare a scope of work and quote to cover the website and stationery and ignore the rest. If you can speak honestly to this ...


3

I would look at classical forms. In architecture we studied how Greeko-roman architecture has been re-employed by empires and institutions (think government, banks etc) of all forms to conjure a sense of stability, security and authority. Additionally the historical period was one where great minds pushed the boundaries of the arts and sciences. This is ...


3

To me (a designer), a company (non-profit or otherwise) using b&w photocopies as their unique print communication comes across as on a shoestring or no budget, amateurist, college-back-room and underground, maybe even semi-legal. I can't really call this a pro or con -- If these are associations your company and your target audience and benefactors will ...


3

The meaning of many terms used in this field - "branding", "corporate identity", "corporate design" - varies wildly between industries and countries. To me, "Branding" is the overall strategy of building a brand, and goes far beyond graphic design or advertising. Virtually everything a brand does - events, campaigns, the placement of products in markets, ...


3

Whether or not this approach is appropriate is going to depend entirely on who your organization is. Assuming it's not a total branding miss ... I've done some very low budget black and white work (offset and digital) for commercial clients and cause-based events. You can achieve great impact if you design for the limited palette* and choose your paper ...


3

Don't get too hung up on being literal with the slogan. Take a look at this list of company slogans. Very few, if any, have any connection with the logo. Plus slogans can change and, hopefully, the logo is a more permanent feature. I would make this case to the client. Instead the logo should encapsulate the association itself. Libraries, books, media, ...


3

Branding is the process of creating an identity that is identifiable. Logo can be part of the brand, but it is only one thing that represents it, a symbol.


3

Good job! What are the top keywords/message that pop in your mind when you saw the logo (albeit still a sketch)? I second @DA01 - it does not matter, really. What it does have, is "swooshiness" and elegance. As the sketch is right now, it is too "heavy", too dark. But that of course will change. What letters, in your opinion, are visible? (I'm ...


3

I guess there's way to much going on—I really don't know where to look first. Cut back on the number of colours. Make the monkey face really stand out by having the lettering be just a single colour. It's a good rule of thumb to have a single focal point in your logo, so as not to confuse the viewer where their attention should be. Also, I've been ...



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