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70

As Wrzlprmft has already pointed out, over 50% of your SVG file's size is taken up by an embedded PNG bitmap image used to create a fairly subtle shading effect on the controller. Just getting rid of that image, and replacing it with a simple radial gradient, is enough to shrink the SVG down to about 10kb.               ...


34

Your SVG contains an embedded pixel graphic for the shade in the bottom right of the controller. This is responsible for about ⅔ of the file size. If you remove it, your SVG file is en par with your JPEG. You can probably achieve an adequately similar effect with a gradient. Other techniques of reducing SVG file size include: Remove all Metadata and ...


33

When to use JPG photographic imagery when compression doesn't matter When to use PNG when you need transparency when you have patterning (backgrounds) When to use GIF when you need backwards compatible animation* when an image is primarily comprised of just a handful of colors (2-16)** when you don't need transparency and have patterning (although ...


32

Because they are way better at compressing pictures that have lots of colours and irregular shapes, like photographs. Have you tried the same epxeriment you did, but then with a photograph? The .png is most probably going to be noticeably bigger than any .jpg, regardless of the .jpg's compression factor. Example: .png picture, 110k. .jpg at 100% ...


26

You can do a lot of things with vector graphics, eventually however the vector graphics need to be rendered to pixels, rasters etc. This rendering process gets slower the more data you have. In fact 3D graphics is also a vector graphic data. 3d renders show the limitations of your rendering speed as many renders to print size take hours to do. Image 1: 3D ...


26

I am a little surprised no-one has mentioned the "Scour" extension. It's bundled with Inkscape (as of v0.47), and does many of the optimisations mentioned by Ilmari Karonen.


23

(migrated from duplicate question) This totally depends on the kind of image you want to store. PNG is a lossless compression format best suited for "vector-like" bitmap graphics (i.e. graphics with large, regular areas with the same colour and clearly defined edges; graphics containing clear text). SVG is a vector format, best suited to contain vector ...


19

You should be aware of a few key factors... First, there are two types of compression: Lossless and Lossy. Lossless means that the image is made smaller, but at no detriment to the quality. Lossy means the image is made (even) smaller, but at a detriment to the quality. If you saved an image in a Lossy format over and over, the image quality would get ...


19

Vector graphics are graphics in which the image is represented in a mathematical fashion. What this allows one to do is to zoom in an image to infinite precision. They are ideal for situations in which an image might be used at various resolutions and dimensions. Raster graphics are of a fixed dimension, somewhat like a grid pattern with specified values at ...


19

In short, Facebook is converting your image to the JPEG/JPG format (Join Photographic Experts Group). There seems to be no current way to upload images to use as a profile picture or to your photo album which Facebook will not convert to JPEG. ...a commonly used method of lossy compression for digital photography (image). The degree of compression can ...


16

While vector images have many advantages, they also have shortcomings. Vector data is, in general, better suited for items which have hard edges. Vector graphics do not excel at creating soft edges areas or shapes which blend into other soft-edged shapes. Yes, you can use raster effects in many graphics applications to blur or "undefine" the edges of ...


15

JPG : Advantages : A lot of different compression level available Easy to manipulate with all images editor Inconvenients : Compression artifacts Uses : Large photos or images with lots of colors When high compression is needed PNG : Advantages : Transparency with alpha ! Lots of colors Can replace jpg Inconvenients : Less compression ...


12

A few of the more well known ones are: PNG, DNG, BMP, GIF (Patents are expired), Some in question are: JPEG (Lawsuits pending), TIFF (Until next year), Some requiring licensing are: JPEG 2000,


12

EPS is not a lossy format. But the format you use for your raster portions can be (the JPGs you are using are always lossy, and you lose something with each successive save). In either case, you should not be using JPGs for print production. Stick with TIF for raster to ensure you don't introduce unwanted compression artifacts. TIF does not have to be ...


11

First of all, both Windows and Mac OS X encapsulates their icons in a container format, meaning that instead of multiple images with different sizes, the file carries images of different resolutions, and the operating system decides on when to use which. Windows uses the .ico format. Pre-Vista, the icons should range from 16x16 to at most 48x48 big and are ...


11

JPEG has backing from the photographic industry and predates PNG by a half-dozen years or so, while PNG was designed as a replacement for GIF, which was rather zealously protected by CompuServe. People were sued for using GIFs on their websites, for example, simply because they didn't use a program that was licensed by CompuServe to make those images. From ...


10

It depends on what type of animation you need. .gif images - Fully supported, but limited use with frames. .png files are supposed to have support for animation, but you don't see it in the wild very often, if at all. Flash, Silverlight, and other plugins - Flash has the most ubiquity, but all plugins need to be installed in the browsers and can't ...


10

Because some things almost cannot be vectorised. So, in the world of sound almost the same question can be asked: "Why we are still using wave files when MIDI has so many advantages". Yes, MIDI files can be stretched or transposed in any ratio, and file size is hundreds of times smaller. And also, they can be exported in any quality using different samples. ...


9

@Pearsonartphoto already puts it nicely. In an effort to find the shortest possible definition that is still correct: Vector graphics are a collection of geometrical elements (primitives like circles, squares, triangles... as well as polygons and curves) that you can enlarge to any size. Raster (Pixel) graphics is a collection of coloured dots. You can't ...


9

Photographs and pixel-based art can have a real-world fidelity that vector artwork can not easily achieve. In real life, things are not really mathematically precise and clean. One can get greater photo-realism per file-size bit with pixels than with a vector shape. That's not to say you can't achieve near photo-realism with vectors - rather that you'll ...


8

Some compression-algorithms change the image to gain a better compression-ration - that are lossy algorithms/image formats. Most notably here is JPEG. Some keep all image information, these are called lossless. Lossless compression produces bigger files, but you have no changes to your graphic. Common lossless image formats are PNG, GIF or TIFF. As most of ...


8

Per Philip's request, I'll turn this into an answer: The only real solution is to pick the pencil tool and get to redrawing/touching-up by hand. Alas, there's no magic filter for this. JPG/MPG is lossy compression. By definition you've lost image data that you're not going to get back. Others have suggested some automated ways that could help, for sure, ...


8

From how-to.wikia: PNG files are lossless compressed bitmaped images. While they are compressed, they can still attain large file sizes depending on the type of image data saved. Similar to GIF files, they are best suited for images with large areas of solid colours and defined boundaries (such as logos). They also support transparencies and 24 ...


8

(that's Illustrator on the left, Photoshop on the right) Raster images are just grids of pixels, like what comes out of a digital camera or a scanner. The file doesn't know what those pixels mean. Web images and digital paintings are most often raster. Adobe Photoshop, GIMP, Krita, Corel Photopaint and Pixelmator are primarily raster (some have a few ...


7

If the target file type is PNG, then you have a few options. First, open the PNG in Fireworks then save optimized. FW compreses .png files better than PS. Then use PNGOUT(freeware) to compress further. Typical result is about 30% less than what Photoshop would produce.


7

Here is an article on exactly your problem. Been having this problem as well. Hope this helps! Facebook uses a low quality jpg compression so any solid colors end up looking heavily pixelated. Solution is to add images at double the size with noise.


7

Having the same problem with a white text on a solid red background. My solution was to replace the solid red by a gradient of to reds. Afterwards I also added a Noise filter (or grain filter (7) in the filter gallery) in Photoshop. The improvement was very noticeable and the result was perfect. In attachment you can see the original and the finished result. ...


7

Web sites can contain JPEG, GIF,PNG, SVG format graphics. Which ones should be used, and when? For photos: JPEG if there is no need for transparency. PNG for photo graphics that need transparency. Whilst not 100% true, it's a good rule of thumb. Check out the other answers to this question to learn more about the other formats. Also, check out ...


6

If you are in an Adobe-only environment, like I usually am, I see no added value in (rather) globally accessible formats like EPS, TIF or JPG. When I do edits in Photoshop to something that is going to be exported to InDesign I save it as Photoshop's native file format (PSD). If the edits and layers are in place, I usually save the file as flattened or all ...



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