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27

When to use JPG photographic imagery when compression doesn't matter When to use PNG when you need transparency when you have patterning (backgrounds) When to use GIF when you need backwards compatible animation* when an image is primarily comprised of just a handful of colors (2-16)** when you don't need transparency and have patterning (although ...


19

(migrated from duplicate question) This totally depends on the kind of image you want to store. PNG is a lossless compression format best suited for "vector-like" bitmap graphics (i.e. graphics with large, regular areas with the same colour and clearly defined edges; graphics containing clear text). SVG is a vector format, best suited to contain vector ...


18

In short, Facebook is converting your image to the JPEG/JPG format (Join Photographic Experts Group). There seems to be no current way to upload images to use as a profile picture or to your photo album which Facebook will not convert to JPEG. ...a commonly used method of lossy compression for digital photography (image). The degree of compression can ...


17

Vector graphics are graphics in which the image is represented in a mathematical fashion. What this allows one to do is to zoom in an image to infinite precision. They are ideal for situations in which an image might be used at various resolutions and dimensions. Raster graphics are of a fixed dimension, somewhat like a grid pattern with specified values at ...


12

EPS is not a lossy format. But the format you use for your raster portions can be (the JPGs you are using are always lossy, and you lose something with each successive save). In either case, you should not be using JPGs for print production. Stick with TIF for raster to ensure you don't introduce unwanted compression artifacts. TIF does not have to be ...


12

A few of the more well known ones are: PNG, DNG, BMP, GIF (Patents are expired), Some in question are: JPEG (Lawsuits pending), TIFF (Until next year), Some requiring licensing are: JPEG 2000,


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JPG : Advantages : A lot of different compression level available Easy to manipulate with all images editor Inconvenients : Compression artifacts Uses : Large photos or images with lots of colors When high compression is needed PNG : Advantages : Transparency with alpha ! Lots of colors Can replace jpg Inconvenients : Less compression ...


11

First of all, both Windows and Mac OS X encapsulates their icons in a container format, meaning that instead of multiple images with different sizes, the file carries images of different resolutions, and the operating system decides on when to use which. Windows uses the .ico format. Pre-Vista, the icons should range from 16x16 to at most 48x48 big and are ...


10

Here's a BMP vs GIF vs JPG vs PNG comparison for you. You should be aware of a few key factors... First, there are two types of compression: Lossless and Lossy. Lossless means that the image is made smaller, but at no detriment to the quality. Lossy means the image is made (even) smaller, but at a detriment to the quality. There are also different ...


9

@Pearsonartphoto already puts it nicely. In an effort to find the shortest possible definition that is still correct: Vector graphics are a collection of geometrical elements (primitives like circles, squares, triangles... as well as polygons and curves) that you can enlarge to any size. Raster (Pixel) graphics is a collection of coloured dots. You can't ...


8

It depends on what type of animation you need. .gif images - Fully supported, but limited use with frames. .png files are supposed to have support for animation, but you don't see it in the wild very often, if at all. Flash, Silverlight, and other plugins - Flash has the most ubiquity, but all plugins need to be installed in the browsers and can't ...


8

Some compression-algorithms change the image to gain a better compression-ration - that are lossy algorithms/image formats. Most notably here is JPEG. Some keep all image information, these are called lossless. Lossless compression produces bigger files, but you have no changes to your graphic. Common lossless image formats are PNG, GIF or TIFF. As most of ...


8

From how-to.wikia: PNG files are lossless compressed bitmaped images. While they are compressed, they can still attain large file sizes depending on the type of image data saved. Similar to GIF files, they are best suited for images with large areas of solid colours and defined boundaries (such as logos). They also support transparencies and 24 ...


7

Per Philip's request, I'll turn this into an answer: The only real solution is to pick the pencil tool and get to redrawing/touching-up by hand. Alas, there's no magic filter for this. JPG/MPG is lossy compression. By definition you've lost image data that you're not going to get back. Others have suggested some automated ways that could help, for sure, ...


6

If the target file type is PNG, then you have a few options. First, open the PNG in Fireworks then save optimized. FW compreses .png files better than PS. Then use PNGOUT(freeware) to compress further. Typical result is about 30% less than what Photoshop would produce.


6

Here is an article on exactly your problem. Been having this problem as well. Hope this helps! Facebook uses a low quality jpg compression so any solid colors end up looking heavily pixelated. Solution is to add images at double the size with noise.


6

If you are in an Adobe-only environment, like I usually am, I see no added value in (rather) globally accessible formats like EPS, TIF or JPG. When I do edits in Photoshop to something that is going to be exported to InDesign I save it as Photoshop's native file format (PSD). If the edits and layers are in place, I usually save the file as flattened or all ...


6

There are some some best practices for keeping images small. When using Adobe's suite of software there is an option to save for the web (photoshop, illustrator, fireworks). With this option you can really hone down on the exact colors and formats you will be exporting. gif is usually better for images with fewer than 256 colors and 1/0 transparency (no ...


6

This is a product of using diagonal lines on a grid (which is essentially what a PNG is: a grid of pixels). Here's a diagonal line on a grid. Each of the squares represents a pixel, greatly enlarged here. Some pixels need to be only partially coloured. It's not possible to colour a pixel like this. It needs to be all one colour. Without anti-aliasing, ...


6

I don't think so. I believe it's the operating system clipboard which kills the transparency so it's more of an operating system issue than an image or application issue.


6

Having the same problem with a white text on a solid red background. My solution was to replace the solid red by a gradient of to reds. Afterwards I also added a Noise filter (or grain filter (7) in the filter gallery) in Photoshop. The improvement was very noticeable and the result was perfect. In attachment you can see the original and the finished result. ...


5

I was able to successfully convert the file to PDF using this online tool and it retained the vector graphics. I was then able to successfully open that PDF in Inkscape and edit as paths. Unfortunately I didn't have the font that it uses on the bottom but it's Myriad Pro so not hard to find and you may have it already :)


5

Sadly, there isn't a straighter native way. There has been some threads on the topic on Adobe forums and even an Adobe employee recommends exporting the image in PDF and opening it in Photoshop — though it is kind of same as exporting it to a EPS and opening it in Illustrator. One other thread comes to the same conclusion, but someone does indeed ...


5

The image is already 802 pixels tall, so it would appear as though it already is "800 px down"... unless you mean that you want an additional 800 px. If so, there's two ways to accomplish this... Method 1 (preferred method) resize the canvas to 92x1600 eyedropper the bottom of the gradient swap your foreground and background eyedropper the top of the ...


5

It seems like you're noticing an RGB colour management issue. PNGs saved from Photoshop can't have ICC Colour Profiles attached (the PNG format supports it, but PNGs with profiles are very rare). If you'd like what's shown in the Windows photo viewer to match Photoshop, then you'll need to set up Photoshop in a way that it doesn't colour manage RGB images. ...


5

Pearsonartphoto mentioned several raster formats. A couple of other file formats that are used for vector based files: SVG (open standard) http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Scalable_Vector_Graphics PDF (originally proprietary, now open standard) http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/PDF


5

When saving images as .jpeg you always lose information. The dialog basically asks you how much information you would like to lose in favor of smaller size on disk (1 = most loss, 100 = least loss). There is no way to tell what you originally selected and the only use would be to have a history of your workflow because this loss is irrecoverably applied to ...


5

You'll probably need to make some manual adjustments to get the file sizes appreciably smaller. For example, the fading transitions in that animation add a fair amount of data, so if they're not vital you could remove them. The amount of detail doesn't make much difference, apart from in terms of keeping the colour palette small. The main thing to bear in ...


5

While GIF is a lossless format, it's also restricted to 256 colors. So in many cases, you're doing to see a reduction in quality from your source file if it's over 256 colors. But if you want to optimize the design for the GIF format, some things you can do: use flat colors (not gradients) limit the number of colors you use have said colors repeat ...



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