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Yes! You can do this from command line (using the Terminal app) with ImageMagick. After you install ImageMagick, navigate to the directory where your picture is located and run the following command: identify -verbose yourimage.jpg | grep -i quality Where yourimage.jpg is the name of the image. And you should get the value which indicates the image ...


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I'm starting backwards on this answer. From the final question. Exporting to pdf When you export a pdf format for print, you should use a specific subformat for example the X family X-1a. This format excude unnesesary features and process the file so it only have the data you need for print. This are old formats but work well. This dosen't alow ...


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The PNG format is for screen. It is an entirely incorrect format to use in any print production files. Not only does PNG not support CMYK, many Raster Image Processors (RIPs) do not understand the format and will choke on it. The correct formats to use would be the native Photoshop format (.psd) or .TIFF. Both these formats support CMYK color, allow ...


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Photoshop allows downsampling to an arbitrary number of colors -- but it will be saved in the image's native color mode (RGB, or at least as Indexed color). The PNG file format allows 2-bit grayscale, and in Photoshop's Save For Web dialog you can set the maximum number of allowed colors. I'd have to test if Photoshop indeed creates a 2-bit grayscale, ...


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2 bit images 2 bit images are not 2 color images. 2 bits would store 4 colors. Currently the png file format allow several bit depths http://www.w3.org/TR/PNG/#11IHDR. Some good years ago the CGA color mode for monitors displayed a Cyan Magenta Black and White images. Those were 2 bit images. You could convert them to Red Green Black and Yellow. That ...



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