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4

Generally, low-pass filters blur, high-pass filters sharpen. Unsharp Mask is BOTH a high- and low-pass filter. So you: Make a low-pass filter (radius parameter) - Gaussian blur - result in a low-frequency image subtract this from original image which results in a high-pass image this is the unsharp mask Make a ramped contrast image of original ...


4

As I wrote on the comment, unsharp filter combines a blurry (unsharp) version of the image with the original, creating an apparently sharper version. High Pass filter is an algorithm which passes the high-frequency detail while blocking the low frequency areas. When applied to a copied layer of the image it results in an image of middle gray, lighter and ...


3

Unsharp mask* is a highpass filtering technique. To be more precise Unsharp mask is original image plus a highpass filter. You can use a highpass layer to accomplish the same thing, yes. You can also use highpass filtering for other things, such as frequency separation, masking of noise, fog removal etc... So unsharp mask is just one implementation of ...


4

1) The facts The reason you have a higher settings than 10/12 is becouse 12/12 is a higher setting. Here are some compression tests following my methodology explained here (In spanish, please use google translate if needed): http://otake.com.mx/Apuntes/PruebasDeCompresion2/1-CompresionJpgProceso.htm a) Using the compression (save as) 12/12 you have a ...


1

Ok and oldie but goodie question; here I go: Some definitions/aclarations: 1) Quality is a process, is taking care on each step of it. In a case of resampling an image there is no "quality" loss, (except if you make mermelade of your own photo, probably compressing it like hell) What you have is information loss when you downsample it. You have a ...


5

Apparently it is a relic from the days of experimentation in the Adobe labs. It is not recommended to use higher than 10 on that scale, it may actually lower the quality of the image or substantially bloat the file size. It would be a welcome change if Adobe removed that experimental extension of the scale.


6

If you really are sensitive to the quality then you should avoid jpeg. You allready lost quality when the original image was saved as jpeg, nothing brings this quality back. In general you should avoid saving your documents out to jpeg unless your shipping the images off somewhere in their final form. Its hard to say wether the quality suffers much at all, ...



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