Tag Info

New answers tagged

4

I think the animated gifs are a good beneficiary of flat design. If you have a limited number of colours, and you do not use gradients you don't need to use dithered patterns. We are used to see this patterns becouse a lot of people use real video segments as avatars, etc. But in this case you have just some colours, lets say 20 and you have at your ...


0

There are some resizing programs that have diferent algorithms than the tipical bicubic. The main diference is that this kind of programs try to preserve the sharp edges between colours (the bicubic aproach is to soften the borders) so, in this case becouse the type of gaphic could work. They don't perform miracles, but can help you to enlarge the image ...


1

If you want to use it for a web-page or a ruff sketch it is ok, if you want to print it you should not use it. Well, you can, but it would only be "good" at a certain width (1 to 3 cm i guess). I would suggest NOT to redraw it in Illustrator as you always ALTER it, which is never a good idea. In such cases you have to contact your client(?) to get a ...


2

From what you've stated, you're a little stuck for choices. As it's impossible to add pixel quality, improving the quality is tricky. Personally, in your situation I would print the logo as best as possible, then photography it as best as possible. Some photoshop editing, better quality. If you have a good printer and good camera, you should be good to go.


0

A good idea is to confirm with your college if you have the "exact" same settings, but probably you moved the "blur" value. Try to use the checkbox "optimized", not "progressive" and uncheck the box "save profile" as you need a really small file. If you are resampling the image on this dialog box try "bicubic sharper". Of course you can try sharpening a ...


0

Illustrator is the best software to export a PDF from. The problem will be related to the size/resolution of the image you're bringing in vs the size/resolution of the one you're putting out.


0

I don't think that this is an issue with the CC applications, but with the way the screenshots are processed. What is the size of the screenshot in pixel? What is the size of the image which gets exported in pixel? What is the resolution set when exporting the image (probably 72 dpi, which is the internal default with PDF)? Which file format is used to ...


-1

I would like to suggest to save it as JPEG and PNG formate and then use this online tool. hope you'll get your desirable site of file.. http://compressor.io/


0

I agree the file size is not the most important issue this days. But if it really affects you I would check some things: 1) When saving my tif file, Am I using LZW or ZIP compression? (don't use jpg compression inside a tiff file) Can my provider decompress the tiff file using it? 2) If it is a ink jet printing probably you can send it on rgb format. Am I ...


1

With print design the file size (kb) should never be a concern. For raster images such as a tiff, Pick any two: [Small file] [High quality] [Press-ready] You can't have all three. The answer to your question, is honestly -- Stop looking at the file size (kb) it is irrelevant for print design work. If you need to transport the file, use a mechanism ...


1

The real answer is to check with your printer about what exact file format and file size they would prefer and provide that. But back to your specific questions: You may be able to reduce the pixel dimensions of your file - I mean 20 inches is pretty large and you might be able to go down to 150 PPI without loosing much quality. And as for JPEG, yes, you ...



Top 50 recent answers are included