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8

Assuming there isn't a reason why it has to be the Google-copyrighted maps you use, I'd use OpenStreetMap for this (the open source wikipedia-style Google Maps alternative). They're virtually identical but with three clear benefits in this case: They have a step-by-step guide on exporting to Illustrator. There isn't a simple process (more below), but it ...


5

Styled Maps Wizard ( link ) does the job. It does have a pretty good instructions that show up when you open up the website. Those instructions can be accessed at any point with the help button at the bottom of Map style panel ( shown in the image below ). Beloware the styles I used to create the static map on the right and in this link.


4

Centerline Tracing The method you are looking for is "centerline tracing". This converts a bitmap to a vector line rather than object graphic. Only few tracers will be able to do that. There is a free Open Source tool AutoTrace which is able to do this fairly well but with limitations depending on the source image quality. Tracing the signature you ...


4

This may not be the best of most efficient method; of course it depends on what exact result you wish for. But here is what I do: I take the file into photoshop, fiddle with the levels and brightness-contrast to get a high contrast image. Then I make it black and white and maybe fiddle a little more on contrast. Then I remove the background (the white) ...


4

I may be misunderstanding your question, but I don't imagine there is a simple way for GIMP (or any other graphics program) to discern and color arbitrary regions on an image with a unique color. How would it know things like Great Britain or United States having multiple geographically-separated regions but color them the same? You'd better buckle down ...


4

Start with a very high resolution raster effect: Maybe 1200 ppi. Apply a slight blur to eliminate any evidence of aliased pixels. Spend some real quality time with the multitude of variables in Illustrator's trace settings. You can make surprising changes with small adjustments. And don't forget that this is low tech effect.


3

First, it may sound obvious, but check your links panel and make sure you don't have that pesky png laying around the pasteboard somewhere. I've noticed that a lot of designers instinctively dupe the image prior to expanding paths "just in case". In terms of the final vector art itself, you basically have two options. Cut down the number of vectors via ...


3

When Illustrator traces an image it searches for details and creates paths, and it does it pretty well, it never has the sharp detail of the original photo but I like the artistic look it applies. Vector files store all their information as mathematical values, allowing them to scale to any size, this means a small vector image's file size probably won't ...


2

What is happening is when you trace your image, Illustrator is making your "transparent background" into "white space". What you need to do is remove this from your trace. 1.Menu > Window > Image Trace 2.A new window will open. This will give you a lot of trace options you can play with and the one in particular you are looking for is under the ...


2

You can simply create a color group of your 60 colors and set the Palette To Document Library then pick your 60-color color group. You can always use Edit > Edit Colors > Recolor Artwork after tracing to reduce colors if needed. Recolor Artwork is often a better option than trying to limit the tracing.


2

Well, I just figured it out - so for those who might wonder, here's an answer. Trace the object without ignoring white. Use the magic wand tool to select all the white areas. Then delete them. Then combine to a compound path. Because all the white areas are gone, they won't become black when combined (since varying fill-style is ignored when combined to a ...


1

It's somewhat difficult to help only seeing a portion. I get pretty accurate results with your posted sample: if you want things a bit tighter, you could start with the "Black & White Logo" setting and reduce the Threshold to 1 and the Noise to 0. If you are trying to thin the paths when they are traces, that's a difficult thing to do. You'd do ...


1

Draw your box filled with your pattern over the artwork. From here you have a couple options: This assumes your pattern has "holes" in it and is not a solid-filled pattern. Select all and click the Make Mask on the Transparency Panel. You may need to uncheck the Clip option on the panel or check the Invert option on the panel. Select the pattern box and ...


1

If you're using it for a logo, then you're probably being paid enough to clean it up by hand (using the ellipse tool). Or, do it the smart way, and just get the Phantasm CS plugin, which has a vector halftone feature. If you want to reproduce the Photoshop halftone filter, you need to start by getting the grid angle and DPI correct. Then you just need to ...


1

here is a great tutorial for you which will get you started: http://www.gomediazine.com/tutorials/from-sketch-to-vector-illustration/ And here are some more tutorials on sketch to vector: http://deltadesignz.com/2010/11/15-sketches-to-illustration-tutorials/



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