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1) Open image in Illustrator 2) Object/Artboards/Fit to Artwork Bounds


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Also, if you have whatever you want to duplicate in a separate layer, you can right click that layer in the "Layers" list and choose "Duplicate Layer..." then choose in the "Destination" drop down - "New" and it will open a new empty document with only that layer in that same position.


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in Photoshop you can do it with reversal methods copy the desire part of the image and click [CTLR + C] and in the any other file click [CTRL + SHIFT + V] or select the part of your image and drag it to the new file while holding [CTRL + SHIFT + ALT] it will past the selected area in the same place or after copy your part of the image .. past it by Edit > ...


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You seem to be Using Linux, and already know libcaca. There is another lib that does exactly what you say (Image to Ascii on command line): Aalib. There are many programs do this. This one works both on Linux and windows. Doesn't use external libraries, full source code available, etc...


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I would guess that the screen-template (your screenshot) will not be that big in the mockup itself. Use the ruler to measure the size of the screen in the final mockup. if that one is smaller than the resolution of your screen, you can just scale the screenshot up to 2880x1800px what results in quality-loss. It will be then again resized to a smaller ...


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In my case I was trying to resize a large image to a small size where 12% of reduction happened... and each and every time the image was pixelated in some way in photoshop. My solution was to take the large png image open it in ilustrator then click in "live trace options" select "high fidelity photo" option then "expand". The result was amazing. Then ...


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After all, the image needs to be cleaned. In GIMP you can use the Select By Color tool with a threshold of e.g. 30 and select the background: Delete the selection with del key and un-select with Shift-Ctrl-A: Scale the image to the desired size using a proper interpolation algorithm: Note that now the drawing is very little: In order to obtain a ...


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Guidelines for choosing the dimensions of your full width browser image I've learnt these through research throughout the last year, and experimentation over the last few days for this specific use case. Choose an image with a single focal point, or no focal point at all. Your source image file will need to be huge (minimum 5000 x 5000) if you want to ...


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Asprilla, While above comments make very good technical points, I suggest tailoring your work to particular client, which starts by looking at their current site's Google Analytics - Reporting / Technology / Browser & OS / Screen Resolution. This way, you will be spending your time and your client's budget wisely by addressing your client's specific ...


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Photoshop does have Edit > Paste special > Paste into, but this doesn't resize the image to the selection. It is however possible to do it by creating an Action in the Window > Actions panel. Or it could be done with a script. Script would give you more freedom to do exactly what you need it to do. Before you start reading the rest of the post, ...


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There are several things to keep in mind when serving images to viewers. Keep the image ratio the same as the original dimensions We do this to prevent the image from getting skewed and to prevent images from being blurry. We can either keep the dimension ratio the same or clip off parts that don't fit. When using an <img> element or ...


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While Vincent's answer is correct if this image were to be on a single page to be placed inside a text block I think you're going to run into issues on the export because you will have to export the ePub as a fixed layout to get this to work as a spread on a device. Since you will run into complications with the text and the image I would use what's ...


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I'm not entirely sure it will work as intended, but you could try to give the image a text wrap. Select it, and find the Text Wrap palette through Window > Text Wrap or Alt+Ctrl/Option+W. Click the second icon 'wrap around bounding box'. That way, the image will not tolerate any text on top of it, pushing any text that would come under or over it to lower ...


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Here is some additional information you may find useful. Screen Size Statistics Popular screen sizes vary, so here are some statistic sites that list screen size usage by percent, browser trends, operating systems and more. http://www.w3schools.com/browsers/browsers_display.asp http://www.netmarketshare.com/ Hero and Large Images A great, easy CSS ...


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The short version Try to design for compatibility with the smallest viewport resolution: Desktops: 800x600 / 1024x768 (in pixels) older mobile phones: 320x480 (in pixels) tablets: 800x1280 (in pixels) By picking the lowest resolution, you ensure that the design will work for people with smaller resolutions as well as larger resolutions. The long ...


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You can use Chrome developer tool to find out current dimension and original dimension of an image. Open the page, hit F12 (Developer tools) and inspect the element using the magnifying glass icon in the top left of the Dev tool view. Once you know which <img> element you need, just scroll to the bottom of the right pane in the tool view. You'll get ...


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When looking at the images from the site, it seems that they were not saved exactly the same. Displayed image: Hidden image: The bottom image seems a bit grainy compared to the top image. I would double check to make sure both images were saved the same, and see if that fixes your problem.


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If I understand your question correctly, then you have two options: You can hand-draw the icons on paper, and scan them into an image-editing program. You can turn the "icon" into a fixed-size PNG with a transparent background, or into a scale-able SVG file. Then, just upload that image into your website, turn it into a link, and position it correctly... ...


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If you already have your banner and are wondering about the little drawings on top, then I can think of two ways of getting them: 1) Buy them online, already made. Sites like iStock or GraphicRiver offer vector illustrations with transparent backgrounds, so it's quite easy to open the files and just paste them on your banner. There are also free icons you ...


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There is a lot of software out there, some free and some paid. Just to list a few: FREE GIMP Ultimate Paint InkScape Paint.Net Paid Adobe Fireworks Adobe Photoshop Adobe Illustrator CorelDRAW All of which have different learning curves, you can fin more graphics software by doing a quick Google search.


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You will experience this issue if the images have been resized within their document frames. When dragging the images out after placing (with cmd/ctl-D) or placing them into an already created frame, the image can get blown up larger than their original resolution. One way to check the actual resolution of the images in comparison to your document is to ...


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Open one of those documents When you open a document, the top most layer is automatically selected, so you don't need to include that in your action I'm assuming that the image within all of your files is in it's own layer and is the only layer in the document, if we don't count a possible background layer. Start recording the action... Select > All ...


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You didn't specify which platform you're on, but I know it's quite easy on Ubuntu using the package 'libimage-exiftool-perl' sudo apt-get install libimage-exiftool-perl For example, to extract height & width from JPG files only in a particular folder and export the results to csv, you could run: exiftool -csv -ext jpg -ImageWidth -ImageHeight ...



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