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1

Google may use a different system but a large number of such services (tineye included) use perceptual hashes where the overall hash is close enough to be a match, rather than exact. A whitepaper showed up a few years back which detailed the process. I haven't been able to find a link to it, but the basic system relies on a action chain to generate the ...


0

Try switching the file format you're saving in. Reverse image searches start by using some data that gets logged intrinsically into the image, which is probably why your obfuscation techniques haven't been working. JPEGs are particularly bad about this, PNGs not so much. With especially popular images, this might not work, however. Ideally, find a way to ...


0

You can do something like this: It is not 100% bulletproof, but it should throw off most image identification engines. What I did was add black and white noise to the image as well as some displacement. Messing with the colors eg. only displacing one or two color channels would be even more effective, but complex to implement.


2

Interesting question - but there's an important distinction that needs to be made. Once you trace and expand an image - as you describe - it's no longer an 'image' in the photographic/pixel-based sense. It has been converted to a vector-based representation. With that in mind, one solution to achieve this (without dividing the text into lots of pieces), ...


0

You can't actually increase the resolution of an image once you have it, unless the photographer has a higher quality file that you can go back to. I would suggest getting RAW files if you reshoot because they are lossless/ not compressed by the camera.


1

If there is a luxury of possibility to re-shoot, I would ask your photographer to re-shoot at the highest possible megapixel that your photographer's camera allow. In this case I would suggest min of 18megapixel setting. and printing your image at atleast 150dpi. This should look still good from close distance. Other option is to use 3rd party plugins for ...


0

Just put your large, edited image in PowerPoint, resize it there, and print. I just took one that was sized in CS6 as 38 inches wide and made a perfect 4x6 out of it with no lossy issues. As we used to say in the old days when we had to do our own programming, the best solution is the simplest one, or what we used to call an "elegant solution."


0

If you can get a screen shot larger than the frame then there is no problem :), if you are going to reduce an image size, to keep the same quality right click on the image in the layer panel and select: "Convert to smart object" then reduce the image (Ctrl+t/Cmd+t) But hold down the shift key whilst reducing to maintain the proportions. That should keep the ...


0

I ended up using Picasa. It was perfect for loading a folder of images, choosing timed transition and then adding a sound track.


0

Record with "Image Size" function used. After recording the action, in action panel, click "Action 1" -> Image Size(Double Click) -> set pixel or percentage or ... then run again


1

As a graphic designer in a very similar position, I would recommend that if you do not have the products available to colour correct, then leave the source images as they are. I have to deal with many manufacturers' product images and although I would like to have them all uniform and tidied up to my satisfaction, I have to accept there will be differences ...


0

The quality of images available for download from that Flicker account should be adequate enough when you print them. They aren't very low resolution, so like mentioned in the other posts, you should be able to get by without having to stretch or resize the images. I would either use Illustrator or Indesign to print the work if you're not planning on ...


0

I wasn't able to find, on a casual search, any images that would be too small to fill a 3x5 notebook. Don't be misled by any "72 ppi" that you see. It's a very common misconception (even among beginning designers) that this is something to pay attention to. It's not relevant at all for print purposes, because all that matters is the actual resolution (in ...


1

Some of those images would work. You need a minimum of 240ppi for most print production. 300ppi is often referred to because it's a nice round number, but the reality is for 150 lines per inch (most print production) you can get away with 240ppi. And more pixels per inch are never an issue. If you download the original of many of those images, open them in ...


0

Profile is like a adress in the space of color reproduction. The monitor profile tells you where your monitor is in this space. The image profile tells you where the image is in this space. In order to navigate between these points and any other point you need to know: where you are where you want to go what to do with the bits that exceed this ...


0

Just found your question. Here is a solution based on a Forum post by user 'loonquawl': You open the XML Editor (under Edit) and look for the color used (select the object on the canvas, and it gets highlighted in the XML Editor), copy the color (it is one of the values in "Style" e.g. fill:#ffff00 and insert it into the Style Box in the Search Dialog ...


1

A straightforward way to do this is: Start with the base image (in its default layer). Add a new layer (with Layer Fill Type "Transparency"), and make sure it is selected. Set the foreground color to white. Select and fill the rectangle you want with the foreground color (white). Set the 2nd layer's opacity to 75%. Set the foreground color to black. Add ...


0

You need to do that in 2 steps, background first, then, write your text. Without layers : 1) make a rectangle selection and increase luminosity 2) write your text over it. With layers (better) : 1) make a new empty layer 2) draw white rectangle then either 3a) change layer opacity (easy) or 3b) add an alpha mask and fill it with gray 4) write ...


0

To answer your boiled down question, while often times this isn't needed—or in fact will take more design/development time—but in your example case there can simply be a narrow crop of the image (with retina @2x versions too) for the mobile layout. That's the beauty of CSS media-queries, that you can include specific versions of the image a wider range of ...


2

I think it looks fine since it will be printed in color as long as it makes sense in the larger scheme of your document. The only suggestion I have is since you're printing in color, keep the blue for links but get rid of the underline. It will make them easier to read. You might also consider doing the link with at least the source name like: National ...


4

That's actually quite easy. There are two ways to do it: Using a mask (best way IMHO, as it gives you more flexibility / editing options): Import your image: Draw a circle that will mask your image: Move the circle behind the bitmap using the Backward toolbar icon: Use the circle to mask the bitmap, by selecting it and choosing Layer › Use as Mask ...


1

FYI: I don't believe any sort of translucent effect is occurring there. It looks to me like a simple white box is placed over the image and under the text at ~75% opacity. To achieve an actual translucent effect, do the above but also select the area of the image covered by the box and apply a blur to it at whatever settings you find appealing.


2

If you use Photoshop CC you don't need any script. You can activate the built-in function "Generator" (File > Generator). This function allow you to export layers and group when you save the document, simply rename your layers/group with the extension you need (like nav.png) and eventually the parameters. With this method photoshop will export for you the ...


-1

Here's what I found. Single-click layer exporting http://viget.com/inspire/single-click-layer-exporting-in-photoshop



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