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5

create your shape give it a stroke select PATH >> STROKE TO PATH You now have a new shape that has the form of your path to which you can apply a stroke and fill to.


4

Make sure that all of the objects in your image are paths (and not circles, rectangles or similar). Selecting everything and path → object to path should do the job. Duplicate (Ctrl + D) the framing rectangle. Group (Ctrl + G) everything but one of the duplicate rectangles. Make a trapezium of the ungrouped rectangle. Select the group and then the ...


4

If you double click (or hit Ctrl+Enter) on a group, you perform the Enter Group command, which turns the group into a temporary layer (you know that you are entered into the group because in the layer drop down menu now appears the group name). In this mode, the Select All command act only on the objects of the group (and this should answer to your ...


3

There are two easy ways: Drag a selection rectangle over the position. Make use of the fact that Inkscape preserves selection when you undo or redo actions: Move one node away, select both nodes and then undo. For some reason, if you select two nodes at the same position, they are not rendered anymore. Nonetheless, if you hit join selected nodes, you get ...


2

Aradnix makes a point that really resonates with my experience. I started off in the Computer Graphics Design world in 1987 while attending The Univ. of Tennessee. The first CG program I used was AutoCad (I think ver. 2.0). At the time there really wasn't any useful raster graphics program available, nor any need for one. By 1989 Win 3.0 showed up and ...


2

I'm not sure what I'm doing wrong. My bezier tool was set to spiro when I drew the heart. Is that affecting it? That’s extremely likely. I would suspect that difference was not programmed to take spiros into account and treated your path like a regular Bézier curve (though it wasn’t). Just selecet your heart and apply object to path before applying ...


1

1) Bitmap copy workaround: Select the bitmap image with the clipping mask and press ALT + B (create a bitmap copy). Delete the original image. The resolution of the bitmap copy can be set in the Edit > Preferences > Bitmaps menu. 2) Filter workaround: Apply dummy filters to the clipped bitmap images (e.g. Filters > Fill and Transparency > Blend with ...


1

Basing on your example, this seems more a vector tool work. If the original source is a vector, you can edit this with Inkscape. If the image is a bitmap, you can import and trace it (as in this example). Now, you can edit the path, it's composed by nodes: Select all the nodes and simplify the path by hitting Ctrl+L With the node selected, convert ...


1

The following may help you: Snapping. This probably solves most of your problems. Using the align and distribute tab. Creating new objects from duplicating existing ones. Create only one half; then mirror (use clones to preview results).


1

There is indeed "Filter > Color > Color Shift", but I think in your case, you should have an object, used as a base color, then some semi-transparent shades of gray above it. So you'd only have to change the base object's color.



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