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0

Ungroup your objects, if needed. Object → Transform → Scale. Select the desired scaling factor. Check apply to each object separately. Apply.


0

As strokes are rendered it's always a good idea to remove them from artwork wherever possible to ensure 100% faithful reproduction. Set your design to the intended size and define a stroke width that you're happy with. Ensure that your design is one large composite path and duplicate it. In the duplicated version use Path -> Stroke to Path before moving it ...


2

When Inkscape exports to bitmap formats it defaults to rasterising full size at 90dpi. As you ask Inkscape to increase the pixel dimensions of your export it will likewise increase the dpi setting. If you want to export your svg at a specific pixel size you should scale your artwork to that size before exporting. This isn't an Inkscape bug but appears to ...


1

Take a look at the 3D boxes tool. It allows you to create three-dimensional boxes with up to three vanishing points and keep those vanishing points consistent over many boxes. The main drawback is that you cannot convert the boxes to wireframes without converting them to paths first (as of Inkscape 0.48).


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This problem has nothing to do with software choice or settings therein but basic mathematics. If your output is intended to be square raster files in multiples of 22 then the source (vector) file and the major elements should be simply divisible by 22. With the horizontal line elements in your design being half the height of their respective dots, and ...


-2

It all depends what you will be using the graphic for in the end. That will determine your preparation. Also maybe you might want to look into some other graphic programs such as Illustrator Photoshop or Corel Draw 300 DPI for print 72 DPI for web.


1

Three ideas here: 1) Don't use word I am asuming you are using word as a midle step fo generate a pdf. So if that is the case don't use it. Word is a realy bad option to handle raster images. It process the inserted images compressing them and resampling them. Instead Save a copy of your work directly as pdf. File > Save as > Choose pdf as the output ...


1

It's a whole bunch of metadata, including embedded JPEG thumbnails: You can open that PDF in a text editor and delete the entire block if you want, and the PDF still works: https://www.dropbox.com/s/l7saorb5zcxr3mf/stripped%20metadata.pdf?dl=0 (about 6kB) Or you can run it through Acrobat Pro and do the "Sanitize" command, which makes it even smaller ...


1

Another much easier solution is: don't use latex in Matlab 2014b to label your axis. For example, you cannot have any thing like x_1^*. If you use only plain text in Matlab, then when you save the file to svg, the text will be kept. You can then edit the .pdf_tex file generated by Inkscape to show the correct label. This is of course due to the bug of the ...


0

Inkscape 0.91 and above has the ability to toggle antialiasing. This can be accessed through the Document Properties window (Shift+Ctrl+D). When turned on, which is the default, this image of an array of triangles looks like this. When turned off the image looks smoother. As others have mentioned, this currently has no effect on the png export. ...


3

The path marker functionality in Inkscape is woefully limited. I would suggest creating your arrowhead as a separate path object, from scratch. It's definitely cumbersome for designs that include a large number of arrows, but you will have a lot more control over the size and position of the arrowhead.


1

If you've combined all your paths into one, try this. Go to the "Fill" tab of the "Fill and Stroke" dialog. At the top right of the Fill tab is "Fill rule". Set this to "evenodd" (the one on the left). I'm guessing this will do it. Or, if your paths are still separate: Select all paths Choose "Path" > "Exclusion"


1

The "Edge 3D" Extension duplicates the selected Path object to create a clipping path. This mask is applied to a group of smaller paths that have a Gaussian Blur Effect. You can see this relationship clearly if you look at the XML Tree in Edit > XML Editor. Unfortunately, this effect is not "live". Any changes to the original path are not applied to the ...


7

Select the white object Choose "Path" > "Stroke to path" Select both objects and choose "Path" > "Difference". (The white object will need to be on top, which clearly it is in this case.)


0

As your question does not make sense to me otherwise, I assume that you have something like an object to which Stroke to Path has been applied (see image below) and you want to convert it to a single path. I further assume that you are only interested in the outline of this object, i.e., the outermost circle in the above example, and not the original line ...


1

If they are shapes, select them all, duplicate them, then union them into one shape.


1

The Image Trace tool is a good tool to start with, but after that you have to clean up the result. To have a nice ribbon, I would select the ribbon segments, go to the Pathfinder palette and click on Unite to have one object, and then fill it with a gradient. There are also gradients in the lion (one for the head and one for the body), you could use that ...


1

The artifacts you experience come from the supposed-to-be invisible strokes at the outer rim of the stacked objects created for each color chosen at tracing. Artifacts may become worse in case we had applied a Gaussian blur to the bitmap before tracing. This is done by the smooth option in the Inkscape trace dialog. Therefore it was a good idea to not check ...


1

The problem is basically in the way Inkscape is deciding to split your image into color regions: instead of simply having the lighter colors overlap the darker ones (or vice versa), you're ending up with two adjacent color areas that both overlap a third color. Since the edges don't line up perfectly (due to both tracing inaccuracies, and also some ...


3

Short answer: no, you can not edit an EPS from a vector application directly in Photoshop. Slightly longer and more meaningful answer: You can not directly edit the vector shapes, points, lines, or fills of an EPS file saved from a different application inside of Photoshop but you can manipulate colors and appearance using Photoshop's adjustment layers and ...


0

While there's a few ways to do it - as noted here - one way that can work really well is to use a viewBox. You simply modify the contents of the SVG tag like so: <svg width="1280" height="800" viewBox="0 0 1280 800"> <!-- More markup... --!> </svg> What viewBox does is it defines an internal coordinate system for the document. ...


1

I am not certain that I correctly understood what you want, but Path → Union (Ctrl + +) should do the job. You may need to apply Object to Path in advance.



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