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13

Adding to Emilie's great answer It's difficult to define what "stressful" is, because it varies from person to person (are designers more stressed than, say, surgeons?), so I'll just focus on the things that I think can make design different from other jobs. Note: Graphic Design is a HUGE field. You can work in print, in web, in motion... you can do ...


10

I think you're asking about niche sub-fields with in the world of graphic design? Off the top of my head: Typeface designer (it's an incredibly small industry, albeit one that doesn't make many people rich) Calligraphers (historically for documents, wedding invites; today they tend to be hired for custom hand lettering for a wide range of uses) hand ...


6

Should designers put ALL of their works in their portfolio? My answer is NO. A portfolio is a collection of your best work. Not EVERYTHING you've done since kindergarten. However, I DO feel that a portfolio should be tailored for who you are showing it to just like a resume. If you are presenting to a client that wants you to do their website, then ...


6

I was recently involved in helping to recruit a new designer and I was asked to design the part of the interview that would test for the right kind of practical creative thinking. What I went with - which seemed to work quite well and got very useful results - was to give each candidate a plausible very basic brief (everyone gets the same one, naturally) ...


6

Sounds entirely like spec work to me. Anyone asking you to do anything other than show samples of your previous work, is asking for spec work. There is never a call for the "do this job and if we like it we'll hire you." And there is never a call for creating a "mock up" of something unless you've already been hired or signed a contract. No respectable ...


6

There are many branches of graphic design and although yes, I've heard all around me about graphic design being stressful jobs, I've managed quite well on that aspect in the past so I would tend to say that where there is a will there is a way. I didn't work much overtime and when I did, I got paid for it. I find there is often a culture of overworking in ...


6

The recruiters in Sydney sometimes find it hard to find good packaging designers - with high level press/ink knowledge. Often niche requirements (to get selected) you will have to need alot of experience to stand out. Being really good in a specific area, such as Fashion or FMCG or corporate branding - recruiters and job advertisers can be very specific for ...


5

Definite No. It is tough to know where to draw the line though, particularly if you have a lot of pieces that you look at as similar quality. You should ask peers what is your best work(s), but more importantly, what is/are the worst. If you get a consistent answer for that, you are hurting yourself, even if it does establish diversity/range. I think the ...


5

It's all relative. No one lives or dies due to design, so I doubt anyone would say graphic design is nearly as a stressful profession as police, firemen, EMTs, doctors, nurses, etc have. Then again, I'd wager that graphic design can be more stressful than things like a farm hand, acupuncture therapist, hot air balloonist, etc. It can be stressful to meet ...


4

Like coding, graphic design is really about creative thinking and problem solving. Also like coding, any test you could give likely emphasizes implementation skills more so than creative thinking. IMHO, these types of tests check for the understanding of particular code syntax or a particular piece of software...both skills that are easy to learn, so ...


4

First I would not necessarily impose a design to a designer unless you can back it up with sound marketing and communication strategy. The designer may surprise you with a fresh look on your business that you had not imagined. I would also make sure to get a few options to compare what might be a better fit (3 is usually a good number). If you do need to ...


4

I agree with Scott's answer and would like to give you a general perspective. But, firstly, some stress is good. It keeps you going; does not let you procrastinate and gives you an opportunity to better yourself continually. In my opinion, everything can be stressful if - If you don't like doing it. If you "want/agree" to do too much of it, too fast. If ...


3

It can be very stressful, but that depends on your workplace and the expectations placed upon you. If you work for a company marketing department that has a constant flow of lead-gen driven deadlines, you can often feel the brunt of that. Reason is that the designer is usually the last person to work on something before it goes out the door (ads, email ...


3

It's mentally demanding. That can be stressful at times. On the flip side, a career that doesn't challenge you mentally can also be stressful. All jobs can be stressful. It depends on your definition of stress, the particularities of your position, your coworkers, your clients, your company, your boss, your salary, your region, your family, etc, etc.


3

Working as a graphics designer is nice. You get to test yourself everyday and as you know practice makes it perfect. Then the unrealistic deadlines come, or the boss want to add something new or change something that took you 2-3 days to make in a few hours just because he thinks it will be simple and easy. All of this get you stressed, you tend to lose ...


3

First and foremost: hire a real designer, and don't succumb to the lure of all the design contest spec work sites or competitions. A good, professional designer will guide you in this process, instead of you having to guide them. Yes, be prepared to pay more. You get what you pay for.


3

For a recent job opening, we were looking for a web designer. A lot of resumes we were seeing were print focused, lots of Adobe experience, and maybe they took a web class a year ago. The test I created was to ask candidates to live write a simple product prototype. Header, nav bar, 25% left column with secondary nav. I didn't care what tools or frameworks ...


3

EDIT: Comments are correct in that this doesn't strictly answer the question. I saw two matters here, one being the finding the correct person and the other the interviewing, and I went for the first. For me, the interviewing is a tool to reach the first. Creative thinking is definitely a must, but I'd actually try to find designers that can demonstrate ...


3

If you are looking for freelance work, you can try Elance or Freelancer. Both sites allow you to upload your portfolio for a fee, but the best way to find projects in those is to browse the ones other users upload. I've worked with both, so I'd recommend you to be particularly careful about which projects you choose, there are lots of fake ones and it's ...


3

If this is for an interview I would suggest tailoring the best 10 pieces you have for that company and putting it in a portfolio. We do have a similar question that might also be useful to you: "What type of paper should I use for print outs for a physical portfolio?" You could always re-iterate that you have more work, if they would like to see it, on ...


2

(note - this refers to art directors in graphic design and illustration. As John says, it means different things in other sectors - particularly advertising where it's not nearly such a high level. This is also based on the UK - other countries might have different standards) Is it possible to go from Art Director to Creative Director? Yes, it's probably ...


2

Adding to Farray's list under Assets, Id also include: Guarantees from the Client to the Designer that the Client has the rights to all Client Content that the Designer may work with. Guarantees from the Designer to the Client that the Designer has secured all necessary rights to third party material (stock photo, open source, etc) that the Designer ...


1

Unlike, engineering design fields there is much less need for "maintenance" graphic design. It is also quite rare that legacy data can not be converted to a newer format. Therefore there are less legacy stuff that could not be done by any competent user. These niche fields suddenly do start to pop up when you enter more technical fields like 3d graphics, ...


1

I find that Founder has the perfect balance; it implies 'yes I started this company', without any implications about the size. It's perfect for owners of small companies. It's also become much more common since it has been used to describe dotcom billionaires. I usually recommend 'Founder & Formal Title'. For example, I recently helped someone to come ...


1

Here's what I would do. Choose a few applicants you like and pre-interview them on what they're looking for, management experience, what kind of budgets they've been use to working for and such. This is for the "bonus" aspect. Of those take the responses that are the most aligned with working in tight budgets and timelines and ditch the ones that are ...


1

Most creative directors start out as a designer and work their way up. Depending on what type of Creative Director role you are after, you should focus your design career in that direction. You mentioned brand management or advertising. The obvious career path for you would be to progress from an Art Director. (see more info in the link Ryan posted to the ...


1

There are some nice things about graphic design: You can do it with relatively little equipment: a computer you probably will want to have anyway, some software, maybe a tablet. Not much else. Because of that, it's a field that can be learned on your own time, in your own home, at your own pace (if that's how you want to learn it.) There are plenty of ...


1

It is a common promotional path to go from designer -> art director -> creative director. So, yes it is very possible, depending on your industry. Art Director is a widely used title that means different things in different industries. In VFX, you are a senior team manager, with many working below you. In advertising/marketing, Art Director title can be ...



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