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46

Pretty much all Gen-Y or young "startup" use that "let's see if we're a good fit" catch phrase. And promise "more work coming" blablabla. Seriously. In other words, it means "we have no money and we're still struggling paying off those 200 nice cups and T-Shirts we ordered with our Word logo on them, and fancy photoshoots of our team of 3, etc.". ...


38

If they want to try you out (fair enough), and their budget is $300, offer something else you are willing to do for that price (a business card proposal? A presentation template? a website banner?) that can show off your skills, test your relationship with the client, and give them something of value. It doesn't have to be a logo or nothing. If they're not ...


17

it was meant to see how we work together "I understand what you're trying to accomplish, but I hope you understand that part of making sure we work well together is respecting and valuing each other on an even playing field. I do excellent work, and if I give you a discount without a contract that includes other work that justifies the discount, then, ...


10

You are kind of comparing apples to oranges. Development is not design. A portfolio is almost always more important for a design position. Employers are interested in a designer's aesthetics, their style, their creativity. None of that can be deduced from a resume/CV. Even a designer with zero creativity or a horrible aesthetic sense can be employed. A ...


8

From your comments on another answer: Since the idea is that this is a trial, thus the reduced budget, I'm wondering if there's a professional, diplomatic way of agreeing to the redesign, but not granting them commercial use and only providing reduced res jpgs for review. I wouldn't play that game. I take a more cynical approach. It sounds like ...


6

What is wrong with "designer", "graphic designer", "graphics manager"? She is an in-house designer, but designer nevertheless.


4

Businesses are looking for people that can do what they need (and contribute in addition to what is needed) and who will work well with their current team. That does not mean that they can already do what they need them to do. Smart, hardworking, friendly people will always perform better than someone who knows every rule in the rule book but isn't fun to ...


4

Portfolios demonstrate the following: Creative thinking Design theory Design craft Knowledge and use of design tools Portfolios are an important tool in getting design jobs - it is the evidence of a designer's knowledge and skills - a bit like a programmer's GitHub account. So to get back to your question - organizations hiring a designer are looking for ...


4

As a 15 year old You're planning ahead! That's great! A lot of us ended up in the field by going to school for it. Graphic Design is a field of study in a lot of colleges and universities. Some of them are BA (Bachelor of Arts) degrees, while some are BFA (Bachelor of Fine Arts). The latter tends to be more of a full fledged art school where you'd be ...


4

Another common position for this kind of job is a designer for corporate communications (typically abbreviated to corporate-comms). Corporate comms have a wider responsibility than marketing. While marketing tend to only focus on advertising, corporate comms produce artwork for seminars, documentation, presentations, charity events etc. But as others have ...


4

I've worked for startups before. This is all about assessing how willing you are to go above and beyond expectations. Startups always work people to the bone - it's absolutely necessary to keep investors happy and to meet the ridiculous deadlines to get more funding. This means finding people who are talented and willing to go the extra mile over and over ...


3

To give the benefit of the doubt to the CEO, remember that the priority is to check 'it was meant to see how we work together' vs delivering world changing design that cost $300. For me, spending $300 to find out 'how we work together' for a bit of work is a fair proposition. Be professional and manage his expectation on what to expect for a $300 project ...


3

I think people here miss an interesting condition: Tell them you agree but if the logo is accepted, they can only use it if they hire you. That way: - You get paid for a job application (I'd take 300 USD as a reward to be tried on a job that I want - any day) - You don't let them get away with a "steal" About how much effort to put in: I guess if you ...


3

At any ol' company, they would be called an in-house designer but that likely wouldn't be their job title. They'd still be titled designer--it's just that they'd be working on an in-house team. At an agency, however, I don't think this person would have any specific title. They're doing the same work as everyone else it seems--it's just that they have one ...


3

Internal Marketing or Internal Communications would be the most common titles. My technical title is Marketing Content Creator for HR purposes though we don't use any titles in practice.


3

It really depends on what job you're looking for. In some places, portfolios and having green hairs are worth more than work experience (e.g. some firms.) In other places, they want designers who got some "mental toughness" because of how stressful the job is (e.g. print shops.) And personality is important everywhere. One thing I can say about portfolios ...


2

A portfolio is always a great way to show a future employer what you're capable of, or what were you manage to produce alongside the previous teams you've worked with or on your own. But in my opinion, neither the portfolio nor your CV is what determines/should determine you belong in that company. From my own experience and those of friends of mine, I ...


2

Design is universal, it doesn't really depend on language since design itself is a language, albeit not in the traditional sense. People who understand design will understand design regardless of their native language. The aesthetics of good design are language agnostic. The ability to produce good design does not depend on the language but on other aspects ...


1

I don't see the problem. There is a strong design community in the french speaking area. http://www.ateliermuesli.com/ http://www.ecal.ch/ http://www.andrebaldinger.com/ https://www.swisstypefaces.com/ These are just some links who popped up in my mind within a few seconds. If that is not good Graphic Design, then I don't know. My native language is ...


1

The confusing thing about titles is that they often incorporate rank, job duty, and focus. In more absurd cases, you'll see something like "Corporate Vice-President for Corporate Communications" (a genuine position at Microsoft), but in this case you could call her something like Sr. Graphic Designer for Internal Projects. Really, the second part is ...


1

To add to what's already been stated you might want look at the location you live in. Many eons ago some friends of mine were taking game design while I was taking graphic design and they where always told that if you are serious you should look into moving to California, Florida , and I want to say New York as well. This may have changed but spend some ...


1

With most jobs it comes down to usually three things: 1) Experience/Portfolio 2) Networking 3) Good personal skills for the interview(s) Education falls under experience. Actual real-world experience typically beats any college degrees (and this is usually demonstrated via one's portfolio). That being said, college degrees do help in getting you past the ...


1

It's going to be tough without much experience and a degree in a related field. Not sure how involved your Digital Media degree would transfer over to the gaming industry. I see plenty of jobs these days that require 2 years of work experience and a degree in a related field just for an entry level position. It is certainly possible to find a job without ...



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