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18

In short, Facebook is converting your image to the JPEG/JPG format (Join Photographic Experts Group). There seems to be no current way to upload images to use as a profile picture or to your photo album which Facebook will not convert to JPEG. ...a commonly used method of lossy compression for digital photography (image). The degree of compression can ...


14

Any time a format isn't available in the Save As dialog, it means that format is invalid for the document in the state it's in. There's no such thing (as Lese and cwedge point out), as a 32-bit (or 16-bit) jpeg, nor a duotone, Lab or 1-bit bitmap jpeg. Photoshop versions prior to CS5 would simply not show jpeg as an available option for 16-bit images, which ...


8

Why low quality JPG saved as high quality in Photoshop increases the file size? If you have a low quality JPEG which you open and re–save with 100% quality (or 0% compression) in any image editing software, the output will be bigger in size than the source. In order to understand this, it is good to take a crash course on JPEG. JPEG compression isn't ...


7

This is an outdated piece of advice related to using images in older layout programs that were not Photoshop-aware. It has no relevance to Save for Web. A jpeg is a flat file, and Photoshop takes care of the flattening (and conversion to sRGB for web use) automatically. In general, practice non-destructive editing: never flatten a PSD, never change original ...


7

Some compression-algorithms change the image to gain a better compression-ration - that are lossy algorithms/image formats. Most notably here is JPEG. Some keep all image information, these are called lossless. Lossless compression produces bigger files, but you have no changes to your graphic. Common lossless image formats are PNG, GIF or TIFF. As most of ...


6

Here is an article on exactly your problem. Been having this problem as well. Hope this helps! Facebook uses a low quality jpg compression so any solid colors end up looking heavily pixelated. Solution is to add images at double the size with noise.


5

Having the same problem with a white text on a solid red background. My solution was to replace the solid red by a gradient of to reds. Afterwards I also added a Noise filter (or grain filter (7) in the filter gallery) in Photoshop. The improvement was very noticeable and the result was perfect. In attachment you can see the original and the finished result. ...


5

When saving images as .jpeg you always lose information. The dialog basically asks you how much information you would like to lose in favor of smaller size on disk (1 = most loss, 100 = least loss). There is no way to tell what you originally selected and the only use would be to have a history of your workflow because this loss is irrecoverably applied to ...


4

What you're observing is not a clipping mask, per se. Jpeg has no transparency and no concept of clipping or masking. Jpeg does have several metadata sections, and many programs will happily store extra information in there. Photoshop stores paths, as you've noticed, and guides. To replicate this, create a new file and add some paths and guides. Then ...


4

Command line is quicker. Install Imagemagick. One file: convert -transparent white whatever.jpg whatever.png More files: Put together a bash script file: for img in *.jpg; do filename=${img%.*} convert -transparent white "$filename.jpg" "$filename.png" done Run it and then you will be done. Note that the above will add transparency to everything ...


4

The reason why your images look different is because of the compression you applied to the second one. The higher the compression, the more the quality degrades. JPEG is a lossy compression format, meaning there is loss of image information during the compression (a sacrifice needed to make the file smaller). For example, this is the same image saved with ...


3

My approach would be to use Select > Color Range: Eyedropper a clean area of the yellow to make it the foreground color. Be sure to set the sampling to 3x3 or 5x5, not single pixel. Choose Select > Color Range and click the "+" icon in the dialog. Work with the image until all the icon pixels are selected but none of the background (should be easy). ...


3

File >> scripts >> Load files into stack Browse for your 450 images, select them all, and press open. This will take a long time! When it's finished the process go to: image >> canvas size Change the width of the document to your desired amount. Now align the first frame to the far left of the canvas, and the last frame to the far right. Select all ...


3

Printers, unless you have a full press with inkwells and rollers you clean, do NOT work with CMYK data. Every end user printer on the market expects and needs to see RGB data. Even many high-end "digital presses" expect to be sent RGB data. What happens.. You send data to the printer If that data is RGB, the printer converts the RGB to CMYK based on it's ...


2

Quick and easy workaround is to Save a Copy. Hold down Option/Alt when you choose Save As. If there's something about the image specifically preventing a format choice, the save as copy will remove that aspect of the image. Although.... There are very few times when you actually want to save as a jpg and not use Save for Web. Be aware, jpg is a lossy format ...


2

I'm not familiar with paint.net specifically, but if you see a sharp image in the editor and it's blurry after export then it is being blurred by the program, not compression. Compression doesn't create blur, but one of the ways that a program can improve the jpeg compression ratio of an image is to give it a slight blur. In Photoshop, for example, there is ...


2

JPG is a lossy scheme. There will always be image degradation when saving as a jpg. If you started with a jpg, then save to a jpg things get even worse, fast. If a jpg set on maximum quality is not yielding the results you wish, then chances are there is no solution other than to live with the quality you are getting if the image must be a jpg. You might ...


2

Export equation from word to pdf File – Save as – Pdf Indesign, Create new document, place pdf File – Place (cmd+D) Export .eps, File – Export – eps Place .eps to corel (i'm cheked in illustrator - equation in vector) Microsoft word Adobe illustrator


2

Various possible reasons: you are re-saving the images at a lower resolution. fewer pixels = less data = smaller file size your camera is likely saving JPGs with minimal compression. Your desktop software is using a higher level of JPG compression. Even if your software is using the SAME compression as your camera, each time you re-save a JPG, you lose ...


2

171x100 pixels gives you an image that is slightly more than 1/2 inch wide at 300 pixels per inch. I'm taking a guess that this is not the size you specified in the Illustrator document, which is why your output was pixellated, and when you worked in inches inside Photoshop you then got a correct result in Illustrator. A 2 inch image at 300 ppi is 600 ...


2

Assuming that no compression has been applied to the file, there are 307,200 pixels, which is a 0.3MP. Handy look up table If each pixel contains 24 bits of information for Red green and blue, then 307,200 * 24 = 7,372,800 bits of information Divide by the 8 bits to become a byte value 7,372,800 / 8 = 921,600 bytes (Or 0.9 Mb) I hope my Saturday night ...


2

Here on Adobe forums is a same problem with successful results: http://forums.adobe.com/message/4271028 Maybe the APP14 tag is not correct? Theres more to APP14 tags than it just being there. On JPEG tags: http://www.sno.phy.queensu.ca/~phil/exiftool/TagNames/JPEG.html#Adobe JPEG Adobe Tags The "Adobe" APP14 segment stores image encoding information for ...


2

If this image is representative of your other images, with large, flat areas of color, then a simple color quantize can give a good result. In the sample images there are only three intended colors: two shades of grey, and yellow. Open the image in Photoshop, and choose Image > Mode > Indexed Color Set: Colors: 3 Forced: None Transparency: Unchecked ...


1

Figured out how to extract them using Photoshop CS5. Possibly works on other versions too, though I didn't test. Open the PDF in Photoshop, choosing the image you want Save as... > JPEG Use all the default values when saving, don't move any sliders The saved JPEG will be a pixel-perfect copy, with correct colors This seems to be the one instance where ...


1

The answer is obviously compression. An typical camera image is 3 long strings of numbers (between 0 and 255), one string for Red, one string for Green, and one string for Blue. The number is the brightness value for an individual pixel. The length of each string is the pixel width of the image mulitplied by the pixel height of the image. A byte is a unit ...


1

JPEG saves brightness (luminance) and color (chrominance) of the image in separate channels. And JPEG has an option (used in your case) to save chrominance at half of resolution, since human eye is generally much less sensitive to changes of color hue than brightness. So what you're seeing is "4:2:2" type of JPEG. To get perfectly sharp edges you need ...


1

Choose the color(to be the border) you want in your color palette. Image -> Canvas Size (increase this by the thickness of the border you want). or "Select All". Edit -> Stroke -> then set the color, line width, inside. or Select the layer of the image (if it's multiple layers, select them and create a smart object). Layer -> Layer Style -> ...


1

I don't know how to put this. Because I don't want it to look like another commercial link toward a product one wants to sell. The last years I have seen many complaints from users about photo quality degrading when uploaded to Facebook. As a photographer, I must say that I've been spending a lot of time to analyze the compression algorithms and how to ...


1

Have you tried flattening the image then going to save > save for web? 'Save for web' gives you more control over the output size plus lets you see the quality change with each setting. There are online services such as http://www.smushit.com/ysmush.it/ , which might help squeeze some kb's out of your images.


1

The free image editor Greenfish Icon Editor Pro has this functionality out of the box. It is a function called "Remove Matte", where you just specify the color component you want to be replaced with transparency. In your case white. This also supports partial transparency, so you will get smooth edge towards the transparent parts. This is not supported in ...



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