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1

Although the question is quite old, I believe that this answer might help others with the same or a similar problem. Using "integrated" LaTeX for typesetting As @KingOliver already mentioned, using LaTeX is a good way for typesetting mathematical formula and equations. A better solution, than dowloading GIFs without any option to change the equations after ...


1

Yes, there's many ways JPG can be interleaved. Your example was probably specially encoded in sequential JPG compression instead of progressive. "..There are tens of thousands different ways to produce progressive JPEGs, "progressive" is definitely not restricted to a single predefined way. For instance JPEGrescan conducts trials with different ...


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I will answer a question you are asking and some questions you are not asking but you need to know. Some objects out of the artboard size Some objects like the trees are out of the artboard, but as they are part of the objects you have they are showing. The huge white space to the right is probably used by some transparent objects or the nodes of this ...


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So you're going about this the wrong way altogether. Your first problem is thinking that you need a jpg to print. If you are exporting an illustration as an image, you are losing quality anyway. The best thing to do is to Save As and then choose Adobe PDF. If for some reason you HAVE TO have a jpg, then just do a Save for Web and you can choose your ...


0

Don't use JPEG. For one thing the JPEG format doesn't handle transparency which is why your background turns out white. It also compresses and rasterizes your images quite a bit which will cost you in quality when printing. Do use PDF. PDF is the format most often used when sending a file to be printed as it's designed to be used for that. For one thing it ...


0

The simplest way is probably to increase the resolution of the exported jpg (Resolution: Other) until the image displays at the size you want. For a more exact formula, multiply the resolution by the image width in inches to predict the final image width on screen. Standard LCD resolution is 72ppi (pixels per inch) at 100%. So, for example, if you have a ...


0

I would be able to provide you directions on how to do this if you could tell me what photo editing programs you have at your disposal.


5

Something not mentioned in great detail is the way these compression algorithms work. JPEG is targeted directly at photographs where slight changes in pixel color are not noticed. PNG is targeted more for fabricated images that contain large areas of a single color where is compression is taken full advantage of like in your example of a huge all white photo ...


10

JPEG has backing from the photographic industry and predates PNG by a half-dozen years or so, while PNG was designed as a replacement for GIF, which was rather zealously protected by CompuServe. People were sued for using GIFs on their websites, for example, simply because they didn't use a program that was licensed by CompuServe to make those images. From ...


31

Because they are way better at compressing pictures that have lots of colours and irregular shapes, like photographs. Have you tried the same epxeriment you did, but then with a photograph? The .png is most probably going to be noticeably bigger than any .jpg, regardless of the .jpg's compression factor. Example: .png picture, 110k. .jpg at 100% ...


1

Reason 1: Additional Meta Data Use a tool like ImageOptim to get rid of all meta data and check the file size again. If all files are (quite) the same size after removing meta data, you know where the extra bytes are. A color profile might also be part of the file and therefore add some bytes. Reason 2: Compression Artifacts Saving an image with JPEG ...



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