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47

Any font has built-in spacing determined by the "side bearing" of each character. In metal type, the side bearing is the physical right or left edge of the individual piece of type that determines its spacing from the characters on either side. Digital fonts mimic this in the basic design process. "To kern" means to adjust the spacing between a pair of ...


31

From the Wikipedia article on letter spacing: In typography, letter-spacing, also called tracking, refers to the amount of space between a group of letters to affect density in a line or block of text. Letter-spacing can be confused with kerning. Letter-spacing refers to the overall spacing of a word or block of text affecting its overall density ...


19

There are several reasons why you might end up kerning type. Well-made and carefully designed typefaces include a kerning table that provides applications with instructions on how to adjust space between letters when they are displayed in text. Unfortunately, there is no way to account for every single letter relationship at every single possible size. ...


18

Look at the red below: We do have some good questions on this such as: Difference between kerning vs letter spacing? What is kerning and what is the point of it? The way I would come up with the kerning in this example is to use the given tracking. Example of this here: Do note that the kerning is subjective in nature and is typically ones ...


16

Polynomial simply means consisting of several terms, as opposed to binomial consisting of only two terms. In most cases, kerning is the spacing between pairs of characters (binomial). It is however possible and useful to apply kerning based on a larger string of characters (polynomial). This is called contextual kerning. (As far as I'm aware, the term ...


15

I would use half the width of the vertical for kerning between most areas (magenta rectangles) then the full width of the vertical on either side of the ls (orange rectangles). If you want a more open and airy feeling, you might consider using the full width of the vertical for most areas and then double the width around the ls. I would also shorten the ...


13

I think the Wikipedia kerning article essentially covers it, but the bulk of the article is about adding kerning information to a font during its design, or applications automatically using this built-in information to improve composition of a font's characters -- rather than the a fine-tuning a designer might do on a particularly problematic pair of ...


12

(via Ironic Sans):


10

Yes, that is essentially it. From Wikipedia: In typography, kerning (less commonly mortising) is the process of adjusting the spacing between characters in a proportional font, usually to achieve a visually pleasing result. In a well kerned font, the two-dimensional blank spaces between each pair of characters all have similar area. The related term kern ...


9

Kerning of accented characters is still suboptimal with a freshly downloaded version of Gentium Plus. Note the collision in the pairs fà and ïb as well as the overly large gap between ľ and e in the below example. By contrast, Linux Libertine solves these problems by contextual forms (for the f), better kerning (between ľ and e) or does not encounter them in ...


8

You're half right! In the case of degrees of arc, the degree symbol follows the number without any intervening space. In the case of degrees of temperature, two scientific and engineering standards bodies (BIPM and the U.S. Government Printing Office) prescribe printing temperatures with a space between the number and the degree symbol, as in 10 °C.[...


8

Applications don't kern by default. The font files have internal kerning data. Application read the internal kerning data and display that. The cheaper the fonts, the worse the kerning tends to be. Default kerning is a direct result of the font file and is not the fault of any application using that font.


7

The essence of good kerning is to achieve an even appearance to the letterspacing in a word. It's a visual, not a mathematical operation. There some really hifalutin' rules to this, but they tend to be more academic than practical unless you're experienced with typography and/or a type designer. Here's a basic rule-of-thumb kerning exercise that will get ...


7

While this may not directly answer your titular question, I hope that it somewhat solves your problem: The following techniques helped me reducing the work on manually kerning a font (which was blackletter; so standard kerning pairs did not apply): By far the most important one: Use kerning classes. While your font may have a lot of glyphs, many of them ...


6

The prefix of nomial refers to the number of glyphs taking into account when determining kerning. Hence a binomial kerning table employs kerning pairs, while a polynomial kerning table considers kerning triplets, quadruplets, and so on. While this choice of words is somewhat justified by the Greek origin of binomial and polynomial meaning consisting of two/...


5

Inkscape certainly converts fonts to paths (Select, then Shift-Ctrl-C). The standard save format is SVG - either 'Inkscape' (extended) SVG or 'plain' SVG. It also has an SVG Font Editor. BTW - I'm assuming this CSS was no good to you: <span style="letter-spacing: 5px">Kerning</span>


5

Saying Adobe is bad at kerning does the software a disservice. Yes, as Scott said in his answer, lots of font files don't kern well by themselves. Fortunately, Adobe has the 'Optical' kerning option built into the Character palette: Using this setting, the software will analyse the letterforms and come up with its own kerning. It's not always perfect, but ...


5

Kerning is the defined space between two characters. All pairs of characters have kerning (either default kerning, defined kerning for the pair in the font, or kerning calculated by the DTP software). Tracking would add (or remove) from the space that's already defined from kerning.


5

I think the square in the first use is a little busy -- I'd at least try how it looks without the cutout in the bottom right, or without the small square on the bottom right, or with neither, even if just to be sure that you prefer what you already have. (For consistency, you'll have to change them all, of course.) About the type, I think that bears more ...


4

Kerning is a generic word for adjusting the letter-spacing or "tracking" on a letter-by-letter basis - it does not refer to any specific process by which to do so. It can refer to either: pre-defined kerning or kern pairs, where kerning information is embedded in the font; automatic kerning, where the text is automatically kerned by computer but not by ...


4

The main reason to pay close attention to kerning is for readability. Visual appeal is also very important. Another reason is that a properly kerned word will typically take up less horizontal space than an unkerned word, therefore allowing larger type sizes (this is useful for book cover design and poster design). For more information, check out this ...


4

Kerning equates to .class { letter-spacing: Xem; } Leading equates to .class { line-height: Xem; } use the exact same conversion you are using for the font size to get the correct em values. 1pt = 1px


4

Try Kern.js. which is based on Lettering.js (both jQuery plugins): http://www.kernjs.com/ http://letteringjs.com/ That would hopefully give you kerning control without sacrificing SEO and accessibility. Update: I just found out about kerning.js, which may offer even more control than Kern.js: http://endtwist.github.com/kerning.js/ Also based on ...


4

Try Inkscape - it's an open source alternative to Illustrator. I haven't used it much myself, but it began as an SVG editor, so converting text to paths and saving as SVG should be easy. http://inkscape.org/


4

My belief is that you simply can not measure with kearning- you just have to really LOOK. Step back five feet. Most of the time, your objective is probably to achieve a sense of balance. You can also use the kearning expressively, but this is not for the weak squeemish newbies or anyone who abhors having to explain themselves. I intentially exaggeratted ...


4

I'm not personally a fan of the "R". It really just looks like a bastardized P to me. But I realize that is probably simply the font you've chosen. Actually reworking the R would go a long way in my eyes. As for the first square: I don't think it's too busy. But I would adjust kerning for the "Plast" section if possible. The P & L, and S & T create ...


4

I like it, fwiw! Comments: 1) Is the first square logo too "busy"? How can it be improved? Not too busy for my tastes, but the mismatch between the lower-right "cut-out" and the red band over the T crossbar catches my eye. I find myself wanting some symmetry here: (1) shows the "problem" with the blue boxes; (2) is the current "standalone" logo. In (...


4

I would say it's design dependant, but I think a good place to start would be with creating a visually equal spacing where my green arrows are while trying to keep in mind the pink arrow. The spacing does not have to match 100% (my green arrows are identical widths), but just tweak until it appears balanced. Like you said, it's not an exact science, but you'...


4

There are some good and helpful resources to help you with your kerning (and also answer your question about common kerning pairs): Briem.net by Gunnlaugur SE Briem has a section dedicated to spacing (and kerning) and provides some methods to achieve good kerning. Also take note of all the sub-sections of the Spacing section. The site Kern King collects ...


3

Your kerning is fine (the S might need one more pixel to the right), but the font doesn't really work for the design (looks like Helvetica). Perhaps try another sans-serif or slab-serif typeface and experiment with both thin and bold fonts. Some resources you can refer to for inspiration: FontFont, FontSquirrel and Adobe Type. Experiment, experiment, ...



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