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38

Any font has built-in spacing determined by the "side bearing" of each character. In metal type, the side bearing is the physical right or left edge of the individual piece of type that determines its spacing from the characters on either side. Digital fonts mimic this in the basic design process. "To kern" means to adjust the spacing between a pair of ...


24

From the Wikipedia article on letter spacing: In typography, letter-spacing, also called tracking, refers to the amount of space between a group of letters to affect density in a line or block of text. Letter-spacing can be confused with kerning. Letter-spacing refers to the overall spacing of a word or block of text affecting its overall density ...


18

There are several reasons why you might end up kerning type. Well-made and carefully designed typefaces include a kerning table that provides applications with instructions on how to adjust space between letters when they are displayed in text. Unfortunately, there is no way to account for every single letter relationship at every single possible size. ...


15

I would use half the width of the vertical for kerning between most areas (magenta rectangles) then the full width of the vertical on either side of the ls (orange rectangles). I would also shorten the height of the lowercase ls. The additional height of the ls is throwing off the balance considerably. Reducing the height of the ls to match the hight of ...


15

Look at the red below: We do have some good questions on this such as: Difference between kerning vs letter spacing? What is kerning and what is the point of it? The way I would come up with the kerning in this example is to use the given tracking. Example of this here: Do note that the kerning is subjective in nature and is typically ones ...


13

I think the Wikipedia kerning article essentially covers it, but the bulk of the article is about adding kerning information to a font during its design, or applications automatically using this built-in information to improve composition of a font's characters -- rather than the a fine-tuning a designer might do on a particularly problematic pair of ...


12

(via Ironic Sans):


10

Yes, that is essentially it. From Wikipedia: In typography, kerning (less commonly mortising) is the process of adjusting the spacing between characters in a proportional font, usually to achieve a visually pleasing result. In a well kerned font, the two-dimensional blank spaces between each pair of characters all have similar area. The related term kern ...


8

Applications don't kern by default. The font files have internal kerning data. Application read the internal kerning data and display that. The cheaper the fonts, the worse the kerning tends to be. Default kerning is a direct result of the font file and is not the fault of any application using that font.


8

You're half right! In the case of degrees of arc, the degree symbol follows the number without any intervening space. In the case of degrees of temperature, two scientific and engineering standards bodies (BIPM and the U.S. Government Printing Office) prescribe printing temperatures with a space between the number and the degree symbol, as in 10 ...


4

pairs are generally more accurate than classes but take longer to create (obviously). classes are the most popular and the difference is negligible, but if you want perfection and a real "optical" look as oppose to a "mathematical" look, use pairs.


4

Kerning is a generic word for adjusting the letter-spacing or "tracking" on a letter-by-letter basis - it does not refer to any specific process by which to do so. It can refer to either: pre-defined kerning or kern pairs, where kerning information is embedded in the font; automatic kerning, where the text is automatically kerned by computer but not by ...


4

Saying Adobe is bad at kerning does the software a disservice. Yes, as Scott said in his answer, lots of font files don't kern well by themselves. Fortunately, Adobe has the 'Optical' kerning option built into the Character palette: Using this setting, the software will analyse the letterforms and come up with its own kerning. It's not always perfect, but ...


4

The main reason to pay close attention to kerning is for readability. Visual appeal is also very important. Another reason is that a properly kerned word will typically take up less horizontal space than an unkerned word, therefore allowing larger type sizes (this is useful for book cover design and poster design). For more information, check out this ...


4

Inkscape certainly converts fonts to paths (Select, then Shift-Ctrl-C). The standard save format is SVG - either 'Inkscape' (extended) SVG or 'plain' SVG. It also has an SVG Font Editor. BTW - I'm assuming this CSS was no good to you: <span style="letter-spacing: 5px">Kerning</span>


4

Try Inkscape - it's an open source alternative to Illustrator. I haven't used it much myself, but it began as an SVG editor, so converting text to paths and saving as SVG should be easy. http://inkscape.org/


4

Try Kern.js. which is based on Lettering.js (both jQuery plugins): http://www.kernjs.com/ http://letteringjs.com/ That would hopefully give you kerning control without sacrificing SEO and accessibility. Update: I just found out about kerning.js, which may offer even more control than Kern.js: http://endtwist.github.com/kerning.js/ Also based on ...


3

I found out that there is a huge problem with generating font files that include kerning pairs in Fontographer 5.0. As update 5.1 fixes this, downloading the newest update (5.2 currently) from FontLab's website should fix this for You. There is also a kind of experimental solution with instructions available on their forums that You can try if You want to ...


3

Your kerning is fine (the S might need one more pixel to the right), but the font doesn't really work for the design (looks like Helvetica). Perhaps try another sans-serif or slab-serif typeface and experiment with both thin and bold fonts. Some resources you can refer to for inspiration: FontFont, FontSquirrel and Adobe Type. Experiment, experiment, ...


3

This is a fairly simple algorithm I tried once, and may be good enough. Render the characters in low resolution - say six or seven pixels tall (height of typical capital) about the same horizontally. You want a simple binary map of where there is empty space vs parts of the letter, on a simple low-res grid. "Fatten" these letter maps. That is, fill each ...


3

My belief is that you simply can not measure with kearning- you just have to really LOOK. Step back five feet. Most of the time, your objective is probably to achieve a sense of balance. You can also use the kearning expressively, but this is not for the weak squeemish newbies or anyone who abhors having to explain themselves. I intentially exaggeratted ...


3

If you want to do serious kerning, there are a few Javascript libraries out there that let you write up kerning rules using something a little like CSS. Of these, the best I've seen is the memorably-named kerning.js, which lets you target characters by pairs (e.g. ss pairs), number (e.g. the 6th character in a heading) and patterns like every nth letter. It ...


2

Kerning equates to .class { letter-spacing: Xem; } Leading equates to .class { line-height: Xem; } use the exact same conversion you are using for the font size to get the correct em values. 1pt = 1px


2

I worked at Adobe making fonts in the 80's and 90's. Back then, the kerning tables built into each font were painstakingly created by hand—or rather, by eye. We spent many hours looking at printed samples, marking and adjusting each letter pair. Kerning by eye is an especially laborious process because of the optical interactions that naturally occur ...


2

First off, kerning and setting the "perfect" type is organic, and very subjective - what seems perfect to me might not work for you. As for programs being bad at kerning, I'll have to disagree. Let me (try to) explain. Digital typesetting programs do not kern text by default. eg. in Photoshop, if you select the text layer and open the "Character" window, by ...


2

Default kerning values for any specific typeface are embedded within the associated font files. All font files contain kerning values. However, not all fonts have good kerning values. This is a bit of a generality However, most well known typefaces fron quality vendors will have decent kerning values and most free fonts will have default values which ...


2

Selecting Text Layers in Gimp Text is represented in an own layer each until we decide to merge layers down. To quickly select a given Layer, or in this case text, I ususally open the "Layers" dialog, accessible from Ctrl + L, or the Windows > Dockable Dialogs menu. There we can select any layer to then use any available transform tool on it such as Move, ...


2

What's the reason for this spacing? Why did the designer choose to create these kerning pairs? Kerning pairs are bits of data in the font file itself. There may be many, many pairs, there may be none. The rendering software may adhere to the kerning pairs, it may not. It's a bit of a crapshoot. Furthermore, you will likely end up kerning and tracking ...


2

I'll show another picture than what Gramps shows. It has something to do with how our eye seperates words: by lightness (darkness on the picture since it's all inverted) of the space between the letters. Now see the picture, which is just the spaces coloured in your example: The space between Xy happens to be almost twice bigger in area than the one ...


2

As boblet points out, there really aren't fonts that have equal spacing between each letterform. The reason is that it would look funny. The spacing between each pair of letters is calculated so that it 'looks' even--even when it's mathematically not (often called optical spacing). The better quality the font, the more of these individual calculations ...



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