Tag Info

Hot answers tagged

18

I instantly recommend you to look at the website Typography for Lawyers ( http://www.typographyforlawyers.com/ ) - in particular the font recommendations http://www.typographyforlawyers.com/?p=587 )


10

What you need to do is contact a lawyer experienced in copyright law. More than likely the first step they will take is send a cease and desist letter to the company. Only after that happens will they suggest further action, if and only if the company does not make the necessary changes. The host provider probably won't want any involvement either until it ...


10

If it is truly in the public domain (or has a public domain notice) you can use it for whatever you want. So yes, it's legal. It may not be all that smart, though, given that anyone else can also use it as their logo. You may lose a good chunk of 'uniqueness' in that regard depending on the particular market you are in. Using a public domain icon of a ...


9

No. If your plug-in replaced the current canvas with a scan of one of the artist's paintings, or something, that would be copyright infringement. But an artist cannot trademark their "style". You can also use their name as long as it is not defamatory and you make it clear that they are not associated with it in any way. Note: As with all laws this is ...


9

According to the U.S. copyright act: A “derivative work” is a work based upon one or more pre-existing works, such as a translation, musical arrangement, dramatization, fictionalization, motion picture version, sound recording, art reproduction, abridgment, condensation, or any other form in which a work may be recast, transformed, or adapted. A work ...


8

I would be very careful with using the name of a living, well-known, commercially active artist. The painting style can probably not protected, but the name can. Artists and celebrities often trademark their name to prevent the sale of products in their name. This is something I would definitely get written permission for, or have checked by a lawyer, ...


8

It's almost redundant to point out that violating someone's copyright is not only unethical, it is illegal. And, yes, it is certainly possible that someone might "contact" you on the subject, depending on the circumstances. If you have no license to use a particular font, but you gained financially by using it, you don't have a defense. "Possible" is not the ...


7

You can file a DMCA notice and address it to the webhosting company hosting their website, and to search engines who will delist the copyright infringing content. If you don't want to do the legwork, you can use a DMCA service. I found this one on Google: DMCA service ($99) and I am sure you can find many others. Or you can write the DMCA yourself. In all ...


7

It would appear this is prohibited. Stack Overflow: Can I legally show Microsoft Office and Project icons in my desktop application? Microsoft: Intellectual Property permissions Microsoft product icons are the thumbnail-sized images indicating that a Microsoft product has been installed on your operating system. Icons may not be used in advertising, in ...


7

Every font should come with a EULA (End User License Agreement) that will outline what you can and can not do with the font. In most every case, you having purchased a license for a font grants you the right to use the font for typesetting any work you are creating. In some cases, there may be some exceptions. Some common exceptions: some fonts don't ...


6

I know this isn't the answer you are looking for, but I think you are asking the wrong question. There is more to sustainability than just "can I get away with this?". If you are planning to make a career in design you will need to get paid for your efforts. By not legally purchasing a product that is commercially available, you are tacitly endorsing a ...


6

A couple years ago a publishing company in the UK was beset upon by the Business Software Association for unlicensed use of fonts in their titles. A former and disgruntled employee gave the tip. The publishing company had to pay well into the six figures in fines as a result of the audit, far more expensive than if they just paid for the licenses up front. ...


6

Every font publisher has its own license that specifies the conditions of use, number of workstations ("seats") on which the font software may be installed, and the specific restrictions regarding use of the font. I don't know of any commercially sold fonts that restrict the number of projects or pieces in which a font may be used, nor can I think of a ...


5

Historically/traditionally it's called the colophon: http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Colophon_%28publishing%29 From the article: […] With the development of the private press movement from around 1890, colophons became conventional in private press books, and often included a good deal of additional information on the book, including statements of ...


5

IANAL, but clear documentation of permissions and focused management of assets on your end are really the only ways to obviate possible use claims. If a stock imagery site isn't able to provide clear documentation about the permissions status of an image, then don't download it and find something else that does. Also, having an asset or content management ...


5

I don't really understand. If the contract states you retain copyright to all preliminary designs, sketches, and mock-ups It doesn't matter how you invoice. The contract states what the client does and does not (or will and will not) own. It's traditional for freelance designers to retain all rights to preliminary work unless it's otherwise stated in the ...


5

My U.S. opinion... based on U.S. work experience. Things could possibly be different in N.Z..... They are paying me at an hourly rate, as an employee, Then they own the work. Under a standard work-for-hire agreements, which all "employees" are, they own everything you create for them. And that means everything. If you do something at home and then use ...


5

If you don't want something stolen, don't put it online. It's that simple. If you feel you must put it online.... come to terms with the fact it will be stolen. You can't prevent it. If I do put something online, I purposely hide secret codes and items in the artwork - things only I know are there - items which I can point out to clearly indicate how I ...


5

Look, you're a designer just starting out, and it sounds like you've shown enough talent to be noticed by a reputable client. You're off to a good start. Let's look at your career path from a long term perspective. As a free-lance designer, you're going to start out not making very much cash, and working hard to advance to bigger and better (and higher ...


4

First off I agree with Alan and other posters answers regarding the ethical and right thing to do. As a designer who is paid for creative work it's just wrong to not respect others creative work. With that being said the actual legalities of it depend on what country you live in but in the U.S. most of the actual federal laws that are punishable criminally ...


4

A few years ago I worked on a game for a large corporation (5,000+ employees) which included several caricatures of famous politicians. Our legal department validated it with the only proviso being to neither include any real names nor explicit references to individuals. The company is UK based but the game was published online. Whilst it's worth getting ...


4

Apple provide images of their devices that can be used for marketing purposes. They can all be found here (requires developer log in to see): https://developer.apple.com/appstore/resources/marketing/index.html So in your specific case, it doesn't matter... you can create an image of your app running on an iPhone or iPad, and Apple are OK with that.


4

I think there are no situations where the terms are simply synonyms for each other. It is a complicated matter indeed. Here are simplified definitions: Public Domain: no restrictions, no copyright claim (not possible in some countries). Creative Commons: work may be used but in compliance with the stated restrictions. Royalty Free: you buy a license once ...


4

The legality is governed by the license. As far as Adobe products are concerend it appears that YES, you may use a typeface within a logo as long as you do not distribute the font file. The arbiter of this is the license and licenses vary. An answer from an apparent Adobe employee ( http://forums.adobe.com/message/5106212 ) You certainly may use any ...


4

Legally required? I'm no lawyer, but I'd say they are legally restricted from using the manufacturer's logo in their own. It's just bad form to use some other companies logo anywhere as "part" of another logo. And I would think there are legal issues with it because "your" company is directly piggy-backing brand recognition from the work of the manufacturer. ...


4

So will they have grounds to cause a stink if I don't inform them that I'm using their logo in this way, even after they've granted me permission to use it? If they gave you permission to use it then the next question is did they ask for what. For example I needed 3 logos from companies so sent out requests --- one wanted to know more specifically what ...


4

I am not a lawyer. You should really always seek legal advice from a legal professional. While other artist may have some experiences to share, they do not possess the education or experience necessary when it comes to dealing with legal matters. Be aware that US laws protect artists and there are only 10 ways an artist can "lose" rights to their work other ...


3

Of course clauses about source files can be hidden in contracts, but I believe it is important that it is clear from the beginning what will happen to the source files and that both parties agrees what will happen. If the company requires the source files and tells the designer about this upfront the designer can set the price accordingly. Some time in ...


3

Are you concerned about who owns the rights or rather are you concerned about getting proper credit for your work? I would think that unless it has been stated otherwise you as a designer are doing work for a client who can then turn around and do with it as they please, free of any input from you as the designer. I can't imagine any client agreeing to ...


3

To give yourself extra reassurance, you might try using Google's search by image function. Other search engines do this too. Drag and drop the image onto Google and the search results will show you sites that are displaying that image. If an image has a source other than the site you found it on, you will likely be able to find it this way. Here is a URL ...



Only top voted, non community-wiki answers of a minimum length are eligible