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18

I instantly recommend you to look at the website Typography for Lawyers ( http://www.typographyforlawyers.com/ ) - in particular the font recommendations http://www.typographyforlawyers.com/?p=587 )


15

Try using Google's search by image to find the original. If you are unable to find it or the copyright about using it, you should not use it in your app to be safe.


15

I'd use the tool https://www.tineye.com/ to do a reverse image search. This might point you to a stock photography site or other site that probably would have more details surrounding the license.


12

It's almost redundant to point out that violating someone's copyright is not only unethical, it is illegal. And, yes, it is certainly possible that someone might "contact" you on the subject, depending on the circumstances. If you have no license to use a particular font, but you gained financially by using it, you don't have a defense. "Possible" is not the ...


11

Most of the time images with proper documentation can avoid legal issues there are so many sites having such images, they will provide you the whole uses document on request : Corbis Images Istock Photos Shutter stock Big stock photos getty Images Find free stock Images 16 websites with Free Stock Images for commercial use Hope this will help.


10

That symbol is an Adobe trademark. The guidelines for use of their trademarks are pretty specific, as with any company. You would definitely be in violation if you used their logo in your product without permission.


10

Every font publisher has its own license that specifies the conditions of use, number of workstations ("seats") on which the font software may be installed, and the specific restrictions regarding use of the font. I don't know of any commercially sold fonts that restrict the number of projects or pieces in which a font may be used, nor can I think of a ...


10

What you need to do is contact a lawyer experienced in copyright law. More than likely the first step they will take is send a cease and desist letter to the company. Only after that happens will they suggest further action, if and only if the company does not make the necessary changes. The host provider probably won't want any involvement either until it ...


10

If it is truly in the public domain (or has a public domain notice) you can use it for whatever you want. So yes, it's legal. It may not be all that smart, though, given that anyone else can also use it as their logo. You may lose a good chunk of 'uniqueness' in that regard depending on the particular market you are in. Using a public domain icon of a ...


10

If you can not find the source you either need to be prepared for possible legal issues or find a different photo to use.


10

No, it is not safe. Just because you aren't able to find and identify the copyright owner of the image doesn't mean that the copyright owner won't find your android app and identify you.


9

According to the U.S. copyright act: A “derivative work” is a work based upon one or more pre-existing works, such as a translation, musical arrangement, dramatization, fictionalization, motion picture version, sound recording, art reproduction, abridgment, condensation, or any other form in which a work may be recast, transformed, or adapted. A work ...


9

No. If your plug-in replaced the current canvas with a scan of one of the artist's paintings, or something, that would be copyright infringement. But an artist cannot trademark their "style". You can also use their name as long as it is not defamatory and you make it clear that they are not associated with it in any way. Note: As with all laws this is ...


9

A brief exploration of the statutory sources you provided may help. Generally you should rely on the plain meaning of the text in the statutes and regulations, as well as on general construction canons. Public Law 102-550 contains the Annunzio-Wylie Anti-Money Laundering Act which deals with counterfeiting deterrence measures amongst other things. In ...


9

After researching and researching on the internet I was unable to find any official documentation regarding novelty notes. Yes there are ton of web sites that passingly state, "It's fine if you aren't trying to defraud." But some random web site having this posted with no follow up was not solid enough for me. The closest to an official stance I could find ...


9

Are you guys scared at all about anyone stealing your art? No. Not scared. It's of no immediate risk to me if someone downloads an image I created. What would you guys do about it if it happens? If there is clear intent to profit off my work, I may then decide to fight it through legal channels. What those channels are depends heavily on your ...


8

You can file a DMCA notice and address it to the webhosting company hosting their website, and to search engines who will delist the copyright infringing content. If you don't want to do the legwork, you can use a DMCA service. I found this one on Google: DMCA service ($99) and I am sure you can find many others. Or you can write the DMCA yourself. In all ...


8

I would be very careful with using the name of a living, well-known, commercially active artist. The painting style can probably not protected, but the name can. Artists and celebrities often trademark their name to prevent the sale of products in their name. This is something I would definitely get written permission for, or have checked by a lawyer, ...


8

I have worked with PowerPoint files as well, but I have also prepared just backgrounds when requested, so it really depends on what they asked and what you agreed on. Perhaps something in between would be ideal, YOU create the backgrounds, but YOU also add them to a PP file along the styles for titles, lists and so on. Regarding the contract, a question ...


7

I know this isn't the answer you are looking for, but I think you are asking the wrong question. There is more to sustainability than just "can I get away with this?". If you are planning to make a career in design you will need to get paid for your efforts. By not legally purchasing a product that is commercially available, you are tacitly endorsing a ...


7

It would appear this is prohibited. Stack Overflow: Can I legally show Microsoft Office and Project icons in my desktop application? Microsoft: Intellectual Property permissions Microsoft product icons are the thumbnail-sized images indicating that a Microsoft product has been installed on your operating system. Icons may not be used in advertising, in ...


7

Every font should come with a EULA (End User License Agreement) that will outline what you can and can not do with the font. In most every case, you having purchased a license for a font grants you the right to use the font for typesetting any work you are creating. In some cases, there may be some exceptions. Some common exceptions: some fonts don't ...


7

As someone who is an amateur designer but frequent purchaser of professional work I would like to offer an answer from the buyer's perspective. I say this with the utmost respect for the design profession and with sympathy to your present situation as I know it's painful to work without being paid. I know I am putting my reputation points at risk with this ...


7

I would look into counsel from a lawyer. When you visit a lawyer you need to make sure to provide what you have in writing. Do you have proof that these designs were under negotiations? Also, by proof I literally mean X company sent you an email saying we would like to discuss with you about X design. Do you have a contract or draft of a contract that was ...


7

Clarification: We are designers, for real answers you should ask a lawyer. First thing I would consider is: Were you paid by the company to design this typeface, or did you have it before you used it for the project? If you were paid to do it, then the type's right probably belongs to the company, and not to you (depends on your contract). You can most ...


6

First off I agree with Alan and other posters answers regarding the ethical and right thing to do. As a designer who is paid for creative work it's just wrong to not respect others creative work. With that being said the actual legalities of it depend on what country you live in but in the U.S. most of the actual federal laws that are punishable criminally ...


6

A couple years ago a publishing company in the UK was beset upon by the Business Software Association for unlicensed use of fonts in their titles. A former and disgruntled employee gave the tip. The publishing company had to pay well into the six figures in fines as a result of the audit, far more expensive than if they just paid for the licenses up front. ...


6

Stylized or not, reproduction of copyrighted work is derivative and subject to the legal issues that brings. So short answer... No, it is NOT okay. You would be better off using a painting already in the Public Domain.


6

I'm very sympathetic to your situation, but I think you're pretty much stuck on this one. After you told them "I don't work in PowerPoint" but then continued to work for them, you put yourself in this position. Corporate types who are accustomed to working with MS Office sometimes can't grasp what the Adobe suite does or how it's different. They want what ...


6

There isn't much you can do to stop someone from stealing your artwork. The only way is to not posting your artwork online. A watermark will not be 100% effective but it will help. I also wouldn't upload 100% quality large artwork. Another more tedious way (only work on personal site) is to split an image into multiple images and place them next to ...



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