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From the U.S. Department of State (www.state.gov) Use of the Great Seal of the United States is governed by Public Law 91-651, Title 18 of the United States Code. This is a criminal statute with penal provisions, prohibiting certain uses of the Great Seal that would convey or reasonably be calculated to convey a false impression of sponsorship or ...


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As per the copyright notes on the Wikimedia commons image of the Seal, it is Public Domain, but heavily restricted in use. Which is common for a seal, coat of arms, flag or insignia. There are laws that allow use in parody, though I can't say how those interact with the stated limitations. Finally, your answer heavily depends on what jurisdiction you are ...


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Using a portion of an image owned by someone else to derive another image would be a question of derivative work, not of fair use. Wikipedia indicates that to be a derivative work, "The transformation, modification or adaptation of the work must be substantial and bear its author's personality to be original and thus protected by copyright." Starting with ...


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The dozen or more stock image companies that I buy from or have bought from STRICTLY forbid using their content for corporate ID/logos, probably because logos are protected by trademark, not copyright, which requires design entirely owned by the party filing the trademark registration. No content owned by another is allowed. That excludes all stock images, ...



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