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20

You are asking a few questions here: Is simply typesetting a company name in a font a logo? Yes, it certainly can be. Is it the best solution? Sometimes, but often it's not the best solution. Can I send a copy of a commercial font I used to a client? No. If it's a commercial font, meaning you purchased a license, then if the client wants to use ...


17

First of all, it is possible to simple have a typographic logo solution. Logos do not have to be graphic marks or use an original font. If your client is happy with what you've made as a standalone logo, then you should be able to create outlines out of the logo and send him a vector form of the logo without going against the copyright. However, perhaps ...


15

Try using Google's search by image to find the original. If you are unable to find it or the copyright about using it, you should not use it in your app to be safe.


15

I'd use the tool https://www.tineye.com/ to do a reverse image search. This might point you to a stock photography site or other site that probably would have more details surrounding the license.


10

No, it is not safe. Just because you aren't able to find and identify the copyright owner of the image doesn't mean that the copyright owner won't find your android app and identify you.


10

If you can not find the source you either need to be prepared for possible legal issues or find a different photo to use.


10

Are you guys scared at all about anyone stealing your art? No. Not scared. It's of no immediate risk to me if someone downloads an image I created. What would you guys do about it if it happens? If there is clear intent to profit off my work, I may then decide to fight it through legal channels. What those channels are depends heavily on your ...


7

There isn't much you can do to stop someone from stealing your artwork. The only way is to not posting your artwork online. A watermark will not be 100% effective but it will help. I also wouldn't upload 100% quality large artwork. Another more tedious way (only work on personal site) is to split an image into multiple images and place them next to ...


7

Company Y. Technically, they're the ones who signed the contracts with the third party, and the Designer X was "part" of company Y at the moment, unless designer X signed a contract with his employer company Y stating that he keeps the rights of his artworks. But if company Y doesn't mind or upon agreement, designer X can be cited for his work. Or both ...


6

Company Y owns all the work Designer X did while employed. Anything to be done with the image must seek permission from Company Y. The designer, as an employee, has no rights with respect to anything he/she created at Company Y. Any attribution or reuse should reference Company Y because Designer X was in a work-for-hire position. In a work-for-hire ...


5

I'm not a lawyer, however to my knowledge... Yes that is illegal and a copyright issue, thats why copyright includes the word, "Likeness." Trademark Protection for Cartoon Characters by Tonya Gisselberg, http://www.gisselberglawfirm.com/downloads/trademark-cartoon2.pdf The court applied the likelihood of confusion factors used by the Third Circuit, ...


5

Feels cliché at this point but should be said: I am not a lawyer and this is not legal advice. This sort of thing is about risk calculation and mitigation. How much risk is there, and is there anything you can do to minimize yours? In this case, let's consider the context. Facebook needs to have a means to throw the book at someone who starts a site called ...


5

Each company or organization has their own terms about this. So you might want to read them for each logo before adding them on your website or marketing material. For example, you cannot add a badge or a logo that could mislead your visitors in thinking you're part of some association when you're not. The permission to use that logo comes with the ...


5

Yes, this is common--especially in student portfolios where a lot of your work would be hypothetical. Do note that while it's fun to design what you like, also keep in mind that everyone thinks that...so consider trying to come up with work that may not be the trendiest subject matter at the time, as odds are a lot of student portfolios will have the same ...


4

Disclaimer: I'm not a lawyer by any means and I'm not officially certified to give legal advice. Those are indeed brand guidelines that the respective brand management teams want you to adhere to. It seems much like the collective internet shrugs about these guidelines, judging by all the different shapes and colours of social media icons you find ...


4

The reproduction or publication of any company's intellectual property, which includes logos, should only be done with the permission of the company(s) involved. If a company owns a logo which is registered then it is against the law in some countries (including the UK) to reproduce it anywhere without seeking consent. If the logo is trademarked, then it is ...


4

The terms 'owning' and 'authorship' do not really fit together. The author has the authorship. Nobody else can ever have. A painting of Picasso will always remain a painting of Picasso. Owning is more about the rights to perform with the work of the author. Depending on the legal framework the author can completely abandon or sell all his/her rights. But ...


4

Morally is really impossible to answer. Everyone is going to have a different opinion on this and context matters. Legally the issue is about appropriating one's likeness. This isn't strictly against the law, but like most intellectual property issues, there's some caveats: http://www.owe.com/resources/legalities/7-issues-regarding-use-someones-likeness/ ...


3

A celebrity is a brand. That brand is marketed to generate revenue, by using that brand to endorse products or services. By providing royalty-free, commercial use, photography you are asking that a celebrity grant the right to use their likeness to promote anything anyone wants. They don't do that for very good reasons. Suppose the celebrity has publicly ...


3

Somebody copying your artwork for commercial purposes is about the best thing that could happen to you. Federal Copyright law allows you to sue them for as much as $250,000 if they do it. As far as penniless kids copying your artwork, I would not sweat it. In all honesty, the publicity you get from people copying your work is worth much more than any "lost ...


3

When one focuses on the negative on loss sight at the whole picture. Look at it this way: Your not getting any money for the pictures if they are hidden. Your not getting exposure if they are hidden. If somebody steals them you get free exposure, you aren't getting any money. On the other hand you were not doing so in the first place. So the net result is ...


3

There is no foolproof way to stop it, but one way to limit the unauthorized usage of your artwork is to restrict the resolution that it's displayed in. This seems to me like it would be the best deterrent. If the image is good enough to be seen on the screen, but otherwise useless in any sort of production environment, then it makes people much less likely ...


3

I know you say watermark is not helpful but, did you think in put a signature in the artwork? Is the most popular method for artists in DA. I don't know if it's effective or not. It's fast and easy solution.


3

it is an open source font that can be used in anyway you want Yep. It is licensed under the OFL license. The key bullet point for your needs is: Use: the freedom to use font software for any purpose So, yes, you can use it in your logo. Also, is it a bad idea to use a web-based font for a logo? It's "web based" in that Google offers it as ...


2

Disclaimer: I am not a lawyer and this post does not constitute legal advice. You cannot / are not supposed to ignore the guidelines specified for their brand. The company could choose to sue you if you change their logo, although this is only likely to happen if you are in some way making money from those modified logos. When using them for personal ...


2

Graphic Designers should understand the power of brand consistency and honor the brand guidelines of said companies. Graphic Designers should also understand the power of color in said brands and, therefore, should respect the logos and not change the colors at all. That said, making them black and white is certainly acceptable and most companies would ...


2

Freepik.com requires you link back to the author when you're on the free plan: Free Plan 33,500+ vectors 2,000+ new vectors every month Requires a link back to credit the author 2 steps download Limit of 60 downloads / day Paid plans do not require this. More info here You can however use it anyway you like, so I don't see a problem with using it in ...


2

No, color palettes cannot be copyrighted in general terms. But there are some specific situations where this isn't the case: One can copyright the arrangement of specific colors in a particular configuration (meaning the exact or near-exact positioning and arrangement of the colors), such as ColourLovers' copyright system for their palettes. This is ...


2

It doesn't so much matter what we think about it, but rather what the lawyer of the company who have trademarked the color think. So, for starters, note that you can't patent a color in the US. You can trademark a particular use of a color, however. This is typically called trade dress. And said trade dress can be protected, but not necessarily the color ...


2

If the client wants to use public domain artwork, suggest that they use a combination of 2 or 3 public domain artworks. When you put them together, they become something unique that you can defend a copyright on. You can see examples of this in military crests that reuse anchors and other generic elements, but they always have 2 or 3 put together in some ...



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