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20

You are asking a few questions here: Is simply typesetting a company name in a font a logo? Yes, it certainly can be. Is it the best solution? Sometimes, but often it's not the best solution. Can I send a copy of a commercial font I used to a client? No. If it's a commercial font, meaning you purchased a license, then if the client wants to use ...


17

First of all, it is possible to simple have a typographic logo solution. Logos do not have to be graphic marks or use an original font. If your client is happy with what you've made as a standalone logo, then you should be able to create outlines out of the logo and send him a vector form of the logo without going against the copyright. However, perhaps ...


15

Try using Google's search by image to find the original. If you are unable to find it or the copyright about using it, you should not use it in your app to be safe.


15

I'd use the tool https://www.tineye.com/ to do a reverse image search. This might point you to a stock photography site or other site that probably would have more details surrounding the license.


10

If you can not find the source you either need to be prepared for possible legal issues or find a different photo to use.


10

No, it is not safe. Just because you aren't able to find and identify the copyright owner of the image doesn't mean that the copyright owner won't find your android app and identify you.


10

Are you guys scared at all about anyone stealing your art? No. Not scared. It's of no immediate risk to me if someone downloads an image I created. What would you guys do about it if it happens? If there is clear intent to profit off my work, I may then decide to fight it through legal channels. What those channels are depends heavily on your ...


9

After researching and researching on the internet I was unable to find any official documentation regarding novelty notes. Yes there are ton of web sites that passingly state, "It's fine if you aren't trying to defraud." But some random web site having this posted with no follow up was not solid enough for me. The closest to an official stance I could find ...


9

A brief exploration of the statutory sources you provided may help. Generally you should rely on the plain meaning of the text in the statutes and regulations, as well as on general construction canons. Public Law 102-550 contains the Annunzio-Wylie Anti-Money Laundering Act which deals with counterfeiting deterrence measures amongst other things. In ...


7

Clarification: We are designers, for real answers you should ask a lawyer. First thing I would consider is: Were you paid by the company to design this typeface, or did you have it before you used it for the project? If you were paid to do it, then the type's right probably belongs to the company, and not to you (depends on your contract). You can most ...


7

I would look into counsel from a lawyer. When you visit a lawyer you need to make sure to provide what you have in writing. Do you have proof that these designs were under negotiations? Also, by proof I literally mean X company sent you an email saying we would like to discuss with you about X design. Do you have a contract or draft of a contract that was ...


7

Company Y. Technically, they're the ones who signed the contracts with the third party, and the Designer X was "part" of company Y at the moment, unless designer X signed a contract with his employer company Y stating that he keeps the rights of his artworks. But if company Y doesn't mind or upon agreement, designer X can be cited for his work. Or both ...


6

There isn't much you can do to stop someone from stealing your artwork. The only way is to not posting your artwork online. A watermark will not be 100% effective but it will help. I also wouldn't upload 100% quality large artwork. Another more tedious way (only work on personal site) is to split an image into multiple images and place them next to ...


6

Company Y owns all the work Designer X did while employed. Anything to be done with the image must seek permission from Company Y. The designer, as an employee, has no rights with respect to anything he/she created at Company Y. Any attribution or reuse should reference Company Y because Designer X was in a work-for-hire position. In a work-for-hire ...


5

What would one do in a situation like that? I would find a lawyer. Which should be really easy, given that this is a fairly obvious case of plagiarism. Good luck!


5

Feels cliché at this point but should be said: I am not a lawyer and this is not legal advice. This sort of thing is about risk calculation and mitigation. How much risk is there, and is there anything you can do to minimize yours? In this case, let's consider the context. Facebook needs to have a means to throw the book at someone who starts a site called ...


5

I'm not a lawyer, however to my knowledge... Yes that is illegal and a copyright issue, thats why copyright includes the word, "Likeness." Trademark Protection for Cartoon Characters by Tonya Gisselberg, http://www.gisselberglawfirm.com/downloads/trademark-cartoon2.pdf The court applied the likelihood of confusion factors used by the Third Circuit, ...


4

Typically a computer font may be regarded as a program that converts a machine-readable piece of text into an image thereof. While it is possible to apply almost any kind of license to a font, and some licenses might give a font owner a partial copyright interest in the images produced thereby, a more common form of licensing would state--as would copyright ...


4

Disclaimer: I'm not a lawyer by any means and I'm not officially certified to give legal advice. Those are indeed brand guidelines that the respective brand management teams want you to adhere to. It seems much like the collective internet shrugs about these guidelines, judging by all the different shapes and colours of social media icons you find ...


4

The reproduction or publication of any company's intellectual property, which includes logos, should only be done with the permission of the company(s) involved. If a company owns a logo which is registered then it is against the law in some countries (including the UK) to reproduce it anywhere without seeking consent. If the logo is trademarked, then it is ...


4

ISO-9001 deals with how a company is managed. In layman's terms its somewhat like this: In a normal company the management does not know how things happen. Its handled by bob, and bob may do it differently each and every time. Now it might be that a client wants the end result to be as predictably within the agreed norms (quality). This then means that the ...


4

The terms 'owning' and 'authorship' do not really fit together. The author has the authorship. Nobody else can ever have. A painting of Picasso will always remain a painting of Picasso. Owning is more about the rights to perform with the work of the author. Depending on the legal framework the author can completely abandon or sell all his/her rights. But ...


3

I am not a lawyer. You should get one, if you are concerned about possible legal issues. Of course, they have. You just cannot grant more rights than you have obtained, so there is no option for you to release a derivative work as a whole¹ to the public domain, or under any free/libre license, or in general any license, that is more permissive than ...


3

If you draw your own version, it's a derivative work, and that's typically protected by your own copyright. The catch is that normally with derivative work, you need permission from the original copyright holder. In this case, you wouldn't, as it's public domain. All that said, as a logo, note that even if you redraw it in your own style, it's not going ...


3

Graphic Designers should understand the power of brand consistency and honor the brand guidelines of said companies. Graphic Designers should also understand the power of color in said brands and, therefore, should respect the logos and not change the colors at all. That said, making them black and white is certainly acceptable and most companies would ...


3

When one focuses on the negative on loss sight at the whole picture. Look at it this way: Your not getting any money for the pictures if they are hidden. Your not getting exposure if they are hidden. If somebody steals them you get free exposure, you aren't getting any money. On the other hand you were not doing so in the first place. So the net result is ...


3

A celebrity is a brand. That brand is marketed to generate revenue, by using that brand to endorse products or services. By providing royalty-free, commercial use, photography you are asking that a celebrity grant the right to use their likeness to promote anything anyone wants. They don't do that for very good reasons. Suppose the celebrity has publicly ...


2

I think section 2 sums it up fairly clearly (well, as clearly as licenses can be): Grant of Copyright License. Subject to the terms and conditions of this License, each Contributor hereby grants to You a perpetual, worldwide, non-exclusive, no-charge, royalty-free, irrevocable copyright license to reproduce, prepare Derivative Works of, publicly ...


2

As Matt said, hire a copyright lawyer. Or at least have someone with the required legal knowledge have a look at your case and advice you on the matter.


2

The answer is ...you are not making it on the same material nor are you attempting to reproduce the actual anti-counterfeiting measures like that strip in the bill. Let's say a million dollar bill existed - you'd still be fine until you are truly trying to defraud which means you match the correct mint location seal to where those bills are printed, the ...



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