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10

If it is truly in the public domain (or has a public domain notice) you can use it for whatever you want. So yes, it's legal. It may not be all that smart, though, given that anyone else can also use it as their logo. You may lose a good chunk of 'uniqueness' in that regard depending on the particular market you are in. Using a public domain icon of a ...


7

Every font should come with a EULA (End User License Agreement) that will outline what you can and can not do with the font. In most every case, you having purchased a license for a font grants you the right to use the font for typesetting any work you are creating. In some cases, there may be some exceptions. Some common exceptions: some fonts don't ...


5

My U.S. opinion... based on U.S. work experience. Things could possibly be different in N.Z..... They are paying me at an hourly rate, as an employee, Then they own the work. Under a standard work-for-hire agreements, which all "employees" are, they own everything you create for them. And that means everything. If you do something at home and then use ...


5

If you don't want something stolen, don't put it online. It's that simple. If you feel you must put it online.... come to terms with the fact it will be stolen. You can't prevent it. If I do put something online, I purposely hide secret codes and items in the artwork - things only I know are there - items which I can point out to clearly indicate how I ...


4

I am not a lawyer. You should really always seek legal advice from a legal professional. While other artist may have some experiences to share, they do not possess the education or experience necessary when it comes to dealing with legal matters. Be aware that US laws protect artists and there are only 10 ways an artist can "lose" rights to their work other ...


4

So will they have grounds to cause a stink if I don't inform them that I'm using their logo in this way, even after they've granted me permission to use it? If they gave you permission to use it then the next question is did they ask for what. For example I needed 3 logos from companies so sent out requests --- one wanted to know more specifically what ...


4

Legally required? I'm no lawyer, but I'd say they are legally restricted from using the manufacturer's logo in their own. It's just bad form to use some other companies logo anywhere as "part" of another logo. And I would think there are legal issues with it because "your" company is directly piggy-backing brand recognition from the work of the manufacturer. ...


4

I think there are no situations where the terms are simply synonyms for each other. It is a complicated matter indeed. Here are simplified definitions: Public Domain: no restrictions, no copyright claim (not possible in some countries). Creative Commons: work may be used but in compliance with the stated restrictions. Royalty Free: you buy a license once ...


4

The legality is governed by the license. As far as Adobe products are concerend it appears that YES, you may use a typeface within a logo as long as you do not distribute the font file. The arbiter of this is the license and licenses vary. An answer from an apparent Adobe employee ( http://forums.adobe.com/message/5106212 ) You certainly may use any ...


4

Look, you're a designer just starting out, and it sounds like you've shown enough talent to be noticed by a reputable client. You're off to a good start. Let's look at your career path from a long term perspective. As a free-lance designer, you're going to start out not making very much cash, and working hard to advance to bigger and better (and higher ...


3

This is the sort of question that you need a lawyer for. There is at least the possibility of a charge of "passing-off" — that is, that people seeing the repairers' logo will assume that it's a local subsidiary (if not actually part) of the manufacturer. Your repairer is deliberately associating himself with the manufacturer. A court would have to ...


3

You own the photos, but if you are using photo of trademarked items in commercial projects then yes, you need releases. Photographers can't use photographs of private buildings or structures in commercial work unless they get releases. They can't use automobiles without releases. I can't see how guitars would be any different. You need a release from ...


2

Adding to John's answer, which has all the important info about the three categories you mention. You wonder about Creative Commons. They are a set of copyright licenses (not an alternative to copyright, they work alongside it). The 'advantage', so to say, is you can choose your copyright terms to best suit your needs. Some of the most used CC licenses ...


2

As far as the format of your question goes, it might be a good idea try and trim it down a bit to the core issue, although certainly the additional "texture" is quite readable and gives some good perspective on the issue. As for a solution to the problem: I don't think it's really possible to do anything about it, although there have been some improvements ...


2

Also to add to DA01's comment if they are wanting to use it for a logo, you should address that the icon is public domain it will be hard to copyright their logo artwork if they try. Which would be a good selling point on creating a custom icon. Furthermore, I would ask for documentation if they are asking you to develop something around the icon in ...


2

IP law and business arrangements as a whole are fuzzy business. Especially without a contract. Your predicament is going to depend on your locality, the documentation surrounding your business relationship in this endeavor, and your process and communication in delivering the artwork in question. There are three things to learn here: Never do business ...


1

To clarify, there are two different licenses: desktop and web. If you have the font on your desktop (legally) you can create graphics for your site with it. You can even specify it in your CSS with fall backs so that it displays for those who also have it on their desktop but degrades gracefully for those who don't. When you choose to embed the font on ...


1

It is virtually impossible to prevent people from stealing anything unless you keep if offline. DRM doesn't work. When you share anything, you automatically put it at risk. Look at the music industry - they aren't doing so well. How you express an idea can by copyrighted, but the ideas itself can't. That's what a patent does. If you do a great design, ...


1

YES. (My comment is hereby submitted reformed as an answer to the original question.) Clearly, from your characterization of the models, you are not using them to represent commercial products, per se, but rather to illustrate and characterize the variety of products constructed using a particular construction method or process. Qualifier: The Turbosquid ...


1

I see an issue present and understand what @Scott is coming from unless you have signed documentation that may prevent such usage from the manufacture. Furthermore it would depend if you are the actual owner of the equipment and hold the copyright. There are some loops but again it would depend on how you are using the photography because they do own the ...



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