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10

If it is truly in the public domain (or has a public domain notice) you can use it for whatever you want. So yes, it's legal. It may not be all that smart, though, given that anyone else can also use it as their logo. You may lose a good chunk of 'uniqueness' in that regard depending on the particular market you are in. Using a public domain icon of a ...


7

Every font should come with a EULA (End User License Agreement) that will outline what you can and can not do with the font. In most every case, you having purchased a license for a font grants you the right to use the font for typesetting any work you are creating. In some cases, there may be some exceptions. Some common exceptions: some fonts don't ...


7

I have worked with PowerPoint files as well, but I have also prepared just backgrounds when requested, so it really depends on what they asked and what you agreed on. Perhaps something in between would be ideal, YOU create the backgrounds, but YOU also add them to a PP file along the styles for titles, lists and so on. Regarding the contract, a question ...


7

I would look into counsel from a lawyer. When you visit a lawyer you need to make sure to provide what you have in writing. Do you have proof that these designs were under negotiations? Also, by proof I literally mean X company sent you an email saying we would like to discuss with you about X design. Do you have a contract or draft of a contract that was ...


7

A brief exploration of the statutory sources you provided may help. Generally you should rely on the plain meaning of the text in the statutes and regulations, as well as on general construction canons. Public Law 102-550 contains the Annunzio-Wylie Anti-Money Laundering Act which deals with counterfeiting deterrence measures amongst other things. In ...


6

After researching and researching on the internet I was unable to find any official documentation regarding novelty notes. Yes there are ton of web sites that passingly state, "It's fine if you aren't trying to defraud." But some random web site having this posted with no follow up was not solid enough for me. The closest to an official stance I could find ...


5

Look, you're a designer just starting out, and it sounds like you've shown enough talent to be noticed by a reputable client. You're off to a good start. Let's look at your career path from a long term perspective. As a free-lance designer, you're going to start out not making very much cash, and working hard to advance to bigger and better (and higher ...


5

My understanding is No. The page view cap is there to gain further money for Adobe if you need more page views. It has absolutely nothing to do with bandwidth or foundry licensing. Adobe has plenty of servers and bandwidth to serve everything and they are the foundry. Adobe would see embedding a Typekit font, with anything other than their own embed code, ...


5

If you don't want something stolen, don't put it online. It's that simple. If you feel you must put it online.... come to terms with the fact it will be stolen. You can't prevent it. If I do put something online, I purposely hide secret codes and items in the artwork - things only I know are there - items which I can point out to clearly indicate how I ...


5

Each font should have a licence that tells you exactly what you can or cannot do without it. Some require that you give them attribution, some require that you buy a licence if it's going to be used for commercial work. If you are unsure about the licence, contact the author of the font.


5

What would one do in a situation like that? I would find a lawyer. Which should be really easy, given that this is a fairly obvious case of plagiarism. Good luck!


4

I am not a lawyer. You should really always seek legal advice from a legal professional. While other artist may have some experiences to share, they do not possess the education or experience necessary when it comes to dealing with legal matters. Be aware that US laws protect artists and there are only 10 ways an artist can "lose" rights to their work other ...


4

So will they have grounds to cause a stink if I don't inform them that I'm using their logo in this way, even after they've granted me permission to use it? If they gave you permission to use it then the next question is did they ask for what. For example I needed 3 logos from companies so sent out requests --- one wanted to know more specifically what ...


4

Commercial use means that the image is used directly in the marketing and promotion of a product that results in monetary gain. Otherwise, you are fine as long as you don't claim ownership of the image either explicitly or implied.


4

Legally required? I'm no lawyer, but I'd say they are legally restricted from using the manufacturer's logo in their own. It's just bad form to use some other companies logo anywhere as "part" of another logo. And I would think there are legal issues with it because "your" company is directly piggy-backing brand recognition from the work of the manufacturer. ...


4

As someone who is an amateur designer but frequent purchaser of professional work I would like to offer an answer from the buyer's perspective. I say this with the utmost respect for the design profession and with sympathy to your present situation as I know it's painful to work without being paid. I know I am putting my reputation points at risk with this ...


4

I'm very sympathetic to your situation, but I think you're pretty much stuck on this one. After you told them "I don't work in PowerPoint" but then continued to work for them, you put yourself in this position. Corporate types who are accustomed to working with MS Office sometimes can't grasp what the Adobe suite does or how it's different. They want what ...


3

If you want to cover your bases the only option would be to include it in a contract that the client is responsible for the content and all associated images that may prove an issue and is the one liable by waiving you of all legal issues. I want to provide this service to more people (putting image inside text) but should I just stick to my own ...


3

You can produce whatever you want from the guidelines, that's what guidelines are. If you copy their exact graphics that's another story but if you're just using it as inspiration and guidance for your own ideas its perfectly legal. Its like if I read a tutorial on best html practices by Smashingmag, and then implement those practices. I don't owe ...


3

IP law and business arrangements as a whole are fuzzy business. Especially without a contract. Your predicament is going to depend on your locality, the documentation surrounding your business relationship in this endeavor, and your process and communication in delivering the artwork in question. There are three things to learn here: Never do business ...


3

I did some more research on licensing and came across the following: Can I use Typekit web fonts for anything other than a website? No. Our web font license requires that the fonts be added to a website with the Typekit embed code. If the website or web app is viewed in the browser (either on the desktop or on a mobile device), it's covered by ...


3

This is the sort of question that you need a lawyer for. There is at least the possibility of a charge of "passing-off" — that is, that people seeing the repairers' logo will assume that it's a local subsidiary (if not actually part) of the manufacturer. Your repairer is deliberately associating himself with the manufacturer. A court would have to ...


2

Also to add to DA01's comment if they are wanting to use it for a logo, you should address that the icon is public domain it will be hard to copyright their logo artwork if they try. Which would be a good selling point on creating a custom icon. Furthermore, I would ask for documentation if they are asking you to develop something around the icon in ...


2

As far as the format of your question goes, it might be a good idea try and trim it down a bit to the core issue, although certainly the additional "texture" is quite readable and gives some good perspective on the issue. As for a solution to the problem: I don't think it's really possible to do anything about it, although there have been some improvements ...


2

These are considered derivatives, and it is expressly frowned upon by the logo owner. Use policy of the logo clearly outline what you can and cannot do with their logo... https://www.facebookbrand.com/guidelines?asset=2&media=1,2,3 especially if they are to be "associated" with the parent company (a new image on a site that links to the facebook page ...


2

Further to what @user568458 said in the comment above about my answer on the other question: Try writing it in your contract with the designer. I AM NOT A LAWYER AND THIS IS NOT LEGAL WORDING. This is just a suggestion. You should run this by an actual lawyer, and I have no idea if this will hold up in court. But I think it's a decent start, and as a ...


2

I think section 2 sums it up fairly clearly (well, as clearly as licenses can be): Grant of Copyright License. Subject to the terms and conditions of this License, each Contributor hereby grants to You a perpetual, worldwide, non-exclusive, no-charge, royalty-free, irrevocable copyright license to reproduce, prepare Derivative Works of, publicly ...


2

When I am not sure if somebody "owns" a photo I use Google image search on the photo. Usually I can find the photographer or original publisher that way or see that the photo is all over the internet. http://www.google.com/insidesearch/features/images/searchbyimage.html


2

As Matt said, hire a copyright lawyer. Or at least have someone with the required legal knowledge have a look at your case and advice you on the matter.


2

Although you may feel this is blatant plagiarism, there are a few things you should consider before pursuing this in any legal setting. How similar is the design to yours, as-in, is it unmistakably similar or identical to a non-bias 3rd party? Is there a possibility your design could be considered generic enough to not be copyrightable in a legal sense? ...



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