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1

I write this answer to add to and clarify the other answers, so I will in parts be repeating stuff. Most importantly, you should know whether you already gave exclusive rights of your font to somebody else or transferred the copyright or similar, which typically happens if you create that font while working for somebody. In this case, what you are allowed ...


2

Typically a computer font may be regarded as a program that converts a machine-readable piece of text into an image thereof. While it is possible to apply almost any kind of license to a font, and some licenses might give a font owner a partial copyright interest in the images produced thereby, a more common form of licensing would state--as would copyright ...


4

Clarification: We are designers, for real answers you should ask a lawyer. First thing I would consider is: Were you paid by the company to design this typeface, or did you have it before you used it for the project? If you were paid to do it, then the type's right probably belongs to the company, and not to you (depends on your contract). You can most ...


2

I don't think we have copyright lawyers here, but generally speaking, if your gut tells you there might be a problem, listen to your gut. Having a flyer which is a riff on fast food without evoking a specific chain is fine. But if you can put the actual chain's flyer next to your client's and they look like siblings, your client may get in trouble. Even if ...



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