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15

Look at the red below: We do have some good questions on this such as: Difference between kerning vs letter spacing? What is kerning and what is the point of it? The way I would come up with the kerning in this example is to use the given tracking. Example of this here: Do note that the kerning is subjective in nature and is typically ones ...


13

Characters that could be interchanged, indeed, would save money in the days of moveable type. That said, the '1' and 'l' were given spots in the typical job case: When typewriters came along, the mechanics dictates that the fewer characters meant the fewer bars needed, which was a huge benefit giving the limited space. As such, early typewriters omitted ...


12

For us to perceive it as a D, you need something on the left side. It can be a line, an arrow, whatever. Your example up there looks like two arrows because that's what it is - with no other line to trick the brain. However, if something is added to the left side, the human brain automatically connects the dots and fills in the rest. Examples of possible ...


8

Type a V Rotate it 180° Apply a gradient overlay.


7

1.Type text , right click on text and select Create Outlines. 2. Apply outside stroke.


7

Out of curiosity, I looked at the book in question to see if there was colophon information. Some books include the typeface names used. This one did not. Then I did a search for 19th century free ebooks with type specimens and found one called Shniedewend & Lee Co's specimen book and price list of type, Shniedewend & Lee Co, Mackellar, Smiths & ...


6

I can assure you that FontForge can do everything that FontLab can, with the exception of two things (that come to mind right now): fancy visual Truetype hinting tools, and support of the UFO format that's widely used by script collections like RoboFab, Superpolator etc. That said, FontForge has a fine and useful Python API itself, which could be used for ...


6

I think you're confusing legibility with readability. A face can be perfectly legible without being comfortable to read in long passages of text. Most display or decorative faces (assuming they're legible in the first place) fall into that category. A good readable text face like Caslon or Garamond, by contrast, isn't always the best choice for instant ...


6

A logo doesn't have to overtly represent anything. It's nice when it does, but there's no hard-and-fast rule about it. Do I see a D by default? No. Is that a big deal? I don't know. Only you and your client can answer that. Just a general comment...I find the weight of the arrows too light for the size and color of the box it's in. You may want to beef ...


5

I would say it's too light to make a "D". But maybe you can try to make the two arrows larger in order to close the shape on the left and make it look like a real "D". They don't have to touch each other, just be close enough to suggest a left line.


5

It would be a snide answer to say "to draw letters distinctly, draw them distinctly," but it points to a truth - letters that look the same do so because someone drew them to be the same. So draw them differently. The challenge, of course, is doing so in such a way that is still legible. You can do something like Wim Crouwel's New Alphabet, but people will ...


5

Select the letter and its counter (hole) and choose Object > Compound Path > Make.


5

This can happen when the type is used at sizes not supported in the hinting. It's essentially a display error. When you print it's gone. Even exporting to PNG or jpeg will fix it in some cases. Other than that, the only fix is more complete hinting.


4

I used Photoshop but have done my best to relate the steps back to the Gimp tutorial you provided. 1. Start by making a new layer filled with white. Then, in Gimp, use "Text to Selection" on the base text layer to removed the letter forms from the new white layer. In Photoshop, Ctrl + Click the layer. 2. Next, blur this new white layer. In Photoshop I ...


4

I would say it's too weak to stand on it's own. If you use it in a logo with a word (so the D is incorporated into the word), the D could probably be more visible.


4

I sort of fixed it by changing the display method in Photoshop. I had anti aliasing method set to 'crisp' I changed it 'sharp' (or vice versa) and it cleaned it up.


3

I have no problem seeing that as a D. Of course; it depends a little on the context, and it would be easier to grasp in its "habitat". @Henrik Ekblom has a good point with using it together with the name, but this is not always needed: it depends on the context you put the logo in. If you are also asking if it is intuitively clear that it represent ...


3

To do this well, you'll need to use an typeface designed for the purpose - look for "inline" fonts.


3

FontLab Studio is the heavy hitter. Most pros use it. FontLab also took over Fontographer (what most folks used back in the day) and have updated it. That's likely a better option for what you need. On the open source side of the aisle, there's fontForge: http://fontforge.sourceforge.net/


3

Many modern fonts to address this problem. Take Adobe's Source Sans Pro and the example they give: This shows you how people will differentiate the characters (1, I, and l) that tend to be confused. Just before that image in the article, the author noted: For usages where this level of distinction is not required, there is an alternate, simple ...


3

Here's my typical workflow. I use this for regular families I've sketched out and handwritten type. Scan your sketches and break up the individual characters (and versions of characters) Set-up a template doc to do your vectorizing that will align with your font building tool (there are certain dimensions that will have to line up in the end depending on ...


3

The cheapest way to do it is with pantone gold. But that is only a avarage way to achieve gold. The real deal is to use «Hot Stamping». A heated die presses the gold-foil onto the stationary. Which results in a realy cool gold effect. The downside of this are the costs because you need a separate die for every size. So if you have two products with two ...


2

Window → Pathfinder Select your letter. Click on "divide." That should punch a hole in the middle of your solid R or A. Click on the WHITE arrow (Direct Selection). Click on the LINE around the counter space (the open spot you want to see through) and delete.


2

They are not the same. Most of the time the capital height is different than the ascender height. Some letters look the same in small sizes. But this isn't a problem for a text letter since the human mind read words as a whole and not every letter by itself. "Aoccdrnig to a rscheearch at Cmabrigde Uinervtisy, it deosn't mttaer in waht oredr the ltteers ...


2

I was able to recreate this effect in Microsoft PowerPoint 2007, 2010, 2013, and 365. I didn't test mac 2011, but I expect it works there, too. Sadly, Photoshop and Illustrator do not have one of the features (miter outlines) that you need to do this. You can accomplish the effect with the following steps: Open Microsoft PowerPoint. Must be version 2007 ...


2

Before you try figuring out how to draw letters and numbers distinctly, figure out which letter/number pairs are giving you trouble. Some differences between letters, like the difference between the large and small C, S, and Z, are not easy to do differently, as they are the same letter only different sizes. Here are some examples of things I've seen people ...


2

If you're looking to do this with an existing typeface, you would most likely have to use the Pen tool and do it manually which is what I have done here using Illustrator:


2

The moment you create a drop cap, you also create an implied box for it to sit in. Its edges are defined by the text lines. In this case, the lines spacing you have used makes for a very awkward white gap below the 2-line drop capital. The 'S' looks as if it's trying to grab on to the lowercase 'u' to prevent itself from falling into the gaping hole under ...


2

Highlight the vector/shape layer and choose Edit > Transform Path > Warp. Then move the handles you see on the shape.


2

If you goto Edit > Transform > Warp with your text layer selected and then select Arc Lower from the dropdown menu this will give you the effect you want. Change the Bend value to make the arc more or less severe.



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