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15

I would use half the width of the vertical for kerning between most areas (magenta rectangles) then the full width of the vertical on either side of the ls (orange rectangles). I would also shorten the height of the lowercase ls. The additional height of the ls is throwing off the balance considerably. Reducing the height of the ls to match the hight of ...


14

Look at the red below: We do have some good questions on this such as: Difference between kerning vs letter spacing? What is kerning and what is the point of it? The way I would come up with the kerning in this example is to use the given tracking. Example of this here: Do note that the kerning is subjective in nature and is typically ones ...


12

Characters that could be interchanged, indeed, would save money in the days of moveable type. That said, the '1' and 'l' were given spots in the typical job case: When typewriters came along, the mechanics dictates that the fewer characters meant the fewer bars needed, which was a huge benefit giving the limited space. As such, early typewriters omitted ...


10

For us to perceive it as a D, you need something on the left side. It can be a line, an arrow, whatever. Your example up there looks like two arrows because that's what it is - with no other line to trick the brain. However, if something is added to the left side, the human brain automatically connects the dots and fills in the rest. Examples of possible ...


7

1.Type text , right click on text and select Create Outlines. 2. Apply outside stroke.


7

Out of curiosity, I looked at the book in question to see if there was colophon information. Some books include the typeface names used. This one did not. Then I did a search for 19th century free ebooks with type specimens and found one called Shniedewend & Lee Co's specimen book and price list of type, Shniedewend & Lee Co, Mackellar, Smiths & ...


6

A logo doesn't have to overtly represent anything. It's nice when it does, but there's no hard-and-fast rule about it. Do I see a D by default? No. Is that a big deal? I don't know. Only you and your client can answer that. Just a general comment...I find the weight of the arrows too light for the size and color of the box it's in. You may want to beef ...


6

I can assure you that FontForge can do everything that FontLab can, with the exception of two things (that come to mind right now): fancy visual Truetype hinting tools, and support of the UFO format that's widely used by script collections like RoboFab, Superpolator etc. That said, FontForge has a fine and useful Python API itself, which could be used for ...


6

I think you're confusing legibility with readability. A face can be perfectly legible without being comfortable to read in long passages of text. Most display or decorative faces (assuming they're legible in the first place) fall into that category. A good readable text face like Caslon or Garamond, by contrast, isn't always the best choice for instant ...


5

It would be a snide answer to say "to draw letters distinctly, draw them distinctly," but it points to a truth - letters that look the same do so because someone drew them to be the same. So draw them differently. The challenge, of course, is doing so in such a way that is still legible. You can do something like Wim Crouwel's New Alphabet, but people will ...


4

I used Photoshop but have done my best to relate the steps back to the Gimp tutorial you provided. 1. Start by making a new layer filled with white. Then, in Gimp, use "Text to Selection" on the base text layer to removed the letter forms from the new white layer. In Photoshop, Ctrl + Click the layer. 2. Next, blur this new white layer. In Photoshop I ...


3

My belief is that you simply can not measure with kearning- you just have to really LOOK. Step back five feet. Most of the time, your objective is probably to achieve a sense of balance. You can also use the kearning expressively, but this is not for the weak squeemish newbies or anyone who abhors having to explain themselves. I intentially exaggeratted ...


3

Here's my typical workflow. I use this for regular families I've sketched out and handwritten type. Scan your sketches and break up the individual characters (and versions of characters) Set-up a template doc to do your vectorizing that will align with your font building tool (there are certain dimensions that will have to line up in the end depending on ...


3

FontLab Studio is the heavy hitter. Most pros use it. FontLab also took over Fontographer (what most folks used back in the day) and have updated it. That's likely a better option for what you need. On the open source side of the aisle, there's fontForge: http://fontforge.sourceforge.net/


2

I was able to recreate this effect in Microsoft PowerPoint 2007, 2010, 2013, and 365. I didn't test mac 2011, but I expect it works there, too. Sadly, Photoshop and Illustrator do not have one of the features (miter outlines) that you need to do this. You can accomplish the effect with the following steps: Open Microsoft PowerPoint. Must be version 2007 ...


2

I have no problem seeing that as a D. Of course; it depends a little on the context, and it would be easier to grasp in its "habitat". @Henrik Ekblom has a good point with using it together with the name, but this is not always needed: it depends on the context you put the logo in. If you are also asking if it is intuitively clear that it represent ...


2

The moment you create a drop cap, you also create an implied box for it to sit in. Its edges are defined by the text lines. In this case, the lines spacing you have used makes for a very awkward white gap below the 2-line drop capital. The 'S' looks as if it's trying to grab on to the lowercase 'u' to prevent itself from falling into the gaping hole under ...


2

Before you try figuring out how to draw letters and numbers distinctly, figure out which letter/number pairs are giving you trouble. Some differences between letters, like the difference between the large and small C, S, and Z, are not easy to do differently, as they are the same letter only different sizes. Here are some examples of things I've seen people ...


2

I'll show another picture than what Gramps shows. It has something to do with how our eye seperates words: by lightness (darkness on the picture since it's all inverted) of the space between the letters. Now see the picture, which is just the spaces coloured in your example: The space between Xy happens to be almost twice bigger in area than the one ...


2

What's the reason for this spacing? Why did the designer choose to create these kerning pairs? Kerning pairs are bits of data in the font file itself. There may be many, many pairs, there may be none. The rendering software may adhere to the kerning pairs, it may not. It's a bit of a crapshoot. Furthermore, you will likely end up kerning and tracking ...


1

Note that the lettering is "graffiti". This might help narrow the search, but the style is hand-lettering and might actually be done as a one-off without a font. The 'O' are identical but that is easily copied and pasted after scanning. If you need to reproduce the logo, then try resampling it so there are 2 or 3x the pixels present, and then trace it to ...


1

Try This, Keep the Shape on top and the outlined text on back of the shape, Select Both Shape and text Go to Illustrator Menu > Object > Envelope Distort > Make with top Object You will get the result like text blends and fits in to the shape you asked to distort


1

There are no "auto-fit" features in Illustrator. There have been a few users who have written scripts to fill something with a shape. In all these scripts a circle is the only shape which will work. There are issues with varying width and heights and collision detection. It's just not something Illustrator was designed to do, or does well. I'm afraid, the ...


1

Effect > Distort & Transform > Roughen USe a small "Size" setting and increase the "Detail" setting to increase the amount and frequency of variation. You won't get holes and peninsulas like in your sample unless you alter the basic shape to include those.


1

Copy original shape paste behind move pasted shape so it is offset from original shape fill pasted shape with pattern adjust edges of pasted shape to align with original path. TIP You never need to create a diagonal line pattern in Illustrator. Simply create a vertical or horizontal line pattern, then apply it to a shape and use Object > Transform > ...


1

Using an inner stroke is unlikely to get the results you're after. I'm not aware of any automatic way to style the text how you'd like it. I think the designer of the packaging in question probably did one of two things: Found a typeface with this feature (there are quite a few). Hand crafted the text and/or the effect. I think the first option is ...


1

Fontlab's TypeTool is a cheaper Windows/|Mac alternative to their full-featured FontLab Studio, which might be of interest if you find FontForge's interface an issue. It's US$99, although I managed to find an older version as a magazine giveaway and upgraded to the latest version for about US$40.


1

There are a number of fairly inexpensive services that will do this for you. A quick Google search turned up this one, but I've seen others. That said, I have to agree with those who suggested fontforge. The interface can be a little weird to get used to, but converting your handwriting to a font is fairly easy to do with it. I'm not a typography expert by ...



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