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17

It's absolutely necessary to attribute any third party graphics that your site utilizes as specified by the license agreement. Just because there might be other sites out there not properly attributing artwork doesn't make it okay at all. If the icon is so "basic" or "minor" that you think it's silly to give attribution, then consider just creating the ...


11

In the specific case of Gotham (or just about any other font made by Hoefler and Frere-Jones with the exception of Hoefler Text and maybe a couple of others), they don't sell through third parties. So, any site that wants to sell it to you for cheap or free is not legit. In more general terms, it's better to assume that a free font site is guilty until ...


10

I am interested in whether it is also necessary to license OS (Mac/Windows) included fonts for commercial use. Depends how you define "use". IANAL, but as far as I know, using a font you legally purchased (either separately or as a part of the OS) to create creative work, and redistributing the font as part of that work in a non-embedded form (i.e. as a ...


10

I guess the only possible answer is to either: check the originating foundry's site (H&FJ in this case) and buy from them an alternative supplier they link to (not relevant in this case) use well-known suppliers with high reputation (Fontshop, MyFonts etc) It is unlikely that the exact same font will both be sold and given away free.


10

Whatever you decide, WRITE UP A CONTRACT. You must both sign it before you begin work. The contract should contain your requirements for licensing and state that you own the copyright otherwise. You can probably find some good language as a starting point from AIGA: http://www.aiga.org Do not in any way proceed without a contract. Even if your contract is ...


9

Yes, you may. I contacted Microsoft support and they confirmed this. However, I don't know how much trust I would put into a chat representative for legal concerns. So, I've provided some more information... Here is an excerpt from Microsoft's own website: Clip Art and Sample Art The End-User License Terms that accompany your software describe ...


9

I would always search the site for any attribution requirements or guidelines. In the absence of that, the The Noun Project has some clear and concise instructions for different forms of media that can be reliably used as a guideline: How to Attribute This Icon Digital Attribution Websites - Include the attribution either on the page where ...


7

The MS page you references quite clearly says that Ascender Corporation licenses these fonts on behalf of various vendors (Agfa Monotype, in this case). The MS link is confusing, because it links to Segoe UI Mono, not Segoe UI. Search the Ascender site using the handy search box in the upper right corner. In the list of fonts shipped with Win7 you'll find ...


7

Yes, a vectorized image generally counts as a derivative of the original, which means that distributing it without the original copyright holder's permission would be a copyright violation. Of course, if you just want to make a nice poster to hand on your own wall, then you're probably safe — doing so might or might not be legal, depending on your ...


7

I haven't read about anyone being sued for vectorizing, but I have read about someone being sued for pixelating. After seven months of legal wrangling, we reached a settlement. Last September, I paid Maisel a sum of $32,500 and I'm unable to use the artwork again. Pixelating is removing detail whereas vectorizing would be adding detail (if you ...


6

The material is copyrighted. You can use it under the terms of the CC licence offered, you can negotiate with the copyright owner for a different license. Or find another resource that has a license you're happy with. Or develop your own. Either it's worth doing this right, or it isn't worth doing. Pick one.


5

This is a legal question rather than a design question, which unfortunately this community is not very well positioned to help you with, since we are not all lawyers (although some of us may be!) and the jurisdiction really varies between states and/or countries. That said, "personal use" is too vague, and dafont/fontspace have countless fonts of dubious ...


5

The guy who created the Obama Hope poster was dinged for violating AP's copyright. While I'm not a lawyer, I'd say if it's for your personal use, you're probably not going to get sued, but if you put it out into the world in any capacity, and/or if you try to make money from it, you'll be in trouble.


5

There is no real difference. You are only using different techniques to reproduce the typeface's glyphs. It's the reproduced result which is the legal focus, not the technique used to reproduce it. What requirements exists depends on the font and the author (you find free fonts that you can use commercially, and others that comes with a very strict ...


5

When you purchase or download a font, there is usually a readme file or a license included which states the usages the artist declares safe. It might be free for personal use, but you have to pay for commercial or even just acknowledge the creator's work. Look at the license, it will answer all :)


5

IANAL, but clear documentation of permissions and focused management of assets on your end are really the only ways to obviate possible use claims. If a stock imagery site isn't able to provide clear documentation about the permissions status of an image, then don't download it and find something else that does. Also, having an asset or content management ...


5

Think of yourself as a carpenter and the client has hired you to trim out a house. You buy the tools, the client pays for the final product (the trim being installed). You walk away with the tools you bought as part of doing business. This is the same with fonts. It's a tool that you as a graphic designer use to produce work for clients. Since the logo ...


5

If the license says it should be attributed, I don't think it should be questionned if it should be attributed or not. These are the conditions and you are free to make your own visual if the conditions are not right for you. Then again, I am fairly sure that in common practice, a lot of people don't bother attributing even when the license requires it which ...


5

Can I use the font on the website using the @font-family rule? Depends on the font license. You need to read the license that came with the font file. Like I found on a website like this: font-family: "Century Gothic","Apple Gothic",AppleGothic,"URW Gothic L","Avant Garde",Futura,sans-serif; That's not necessarily using an embedded @font-family. ...


4

Segoe UI is not for sale, and only available pre-packaged with certain Microsoft products. Therefore, if you don't have it already, buying a copy of Windows 7 would be a legitimate way of obtaining Segoe UI for use on the computer you install it on. Once you have a legitimate copy of the font in your possession, feel free to use it to create whatever ...


4

In terms of technology, likely no problem. Font file formats are mostly cross platform these days (OSX and Windows 7 can handle most font file formats). Legally, though, it's murky. The fonts that come with OSX are licensed with the purchase of the Operating system. Technically, you are allowed to use them with the operating system...but not on other ...


4

I'd say it's a very blurry line (and as many similar cases: It's always better to ask a lawyer). As for your first question, the HTML code (the code itself) would probably not violate the clause. The CSS and images, on the other side, might. No Derivative Works — You may not alter, transform, or build upon this work. Looking at the definition of No ...


4

Your proposal means that you buy the image and then either sell the image to your client, perhaps for nothing or as an included fee in the full project price; keep a copy of the image yourself and distribute a copy to your client (perhaps for a fee, or maybe not). Both of these are explicity forbidden by the licence, which states that you may not:— ...


4

By reselling images to clients, most agencies and design firms are probably falling into a grey area in terms of violation of these license agreements. This is a very interesting legal issue that must be causing conflicts on the order of thousands of times a day. We all buy stock and use it in work. That's what stock images are intended for. As an agency, ...


4

If your main concern is not wanting to mess up your web design with bylines attached to every graphic, be aware that you generally have some flexibility with how you give attribution. In particular, you may be able to give attribution in HTML comments that don't actually show up on the page. The full legal text of the international version of CC-BY-3.0 ...


4

AFAIK, answer to both questions is 'yes, go ahead'. A warning, though: don't mix up the css rule font-family with th css technique @font-face. font-family is the first example you give, which will cause the browser to search for the typeface on the visitor's machine and proceeding with the next font when failing. This is also called a 'font stack'. ...


3

If it's a licensed typeface, then you'll need a license to use it to create the logo. Once the logo is created, most type licenses allow you use it in the logo from the get-go. Some foundries, however, may have specific clauses. For instance, House Industries has some caveats if the logo is going to be used for a rather large corporation.


3

In every question about licensing terms, the correct procedure is to contact the rights-holder of the font or typeface. The actual owner of the typeface, and licensing, is the only one who with the authority to answer your questions about license terms. If you for some reason cannot contact or get a response from the owner of the rights in question, your ...


3

I know this is an old question but still quite interesting too see that Microsoft decided not to either opensource their fonts or make them available for purchase. Unfortunately, even now it is not possible to legally use any of the Segoe UI or Segoe WP family fonts in your own materials (commercially or otherwise), it is also impossible to take the ones ...


3

The AIGA Standard Form of Agreement is a good starting point. See Schedule A: "Intellectual Property Provisions." You can take language straight out of that and use it. The AIGA is an excellent resource for contract, copyright, rate and other information. Truth be told, if you took your bullet list and reworded it slightly, it would make a simple and clear ...



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