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22

The hatching can be achieved by using pattern.Once you create a pattern,you can control the direction of hatching as required. Below are the steps to apply hatching to your drawing (I will apply this in a simple rectangle). Create a closed path for which hatching is required(I have used a simple rectangle) Now draw a line using pen tool and convert the ...


18

Rounded dotted lines are easy,(using a round brush as base) just setup the spacing bigger in "brush tip shape" settings. When wanting dashed ones, add square tip brushes if you havent got there, it comes default in the "load brushes" list at brushes window (accessing from right top corner icon in this brushes window). Choose a square tip brush. In brush tip ...


11

There are some changes in color. Tts difficult to see with naked eyes but if you import you object to photoshop and use eyedroper you can see some color variations. How you can achieve this effect: Create the pattern(There are lots of ways to create this if you don't want to create this manually). You can change the color of upper and lower strips ...


10

Just want to add a more general point about your approach. (tldr: sketch out the frame of the face and get that right before adding any detail) It looks like you're closely copying each detail of the source photo, hoping that a likeness will spring out when you add enough accurately copied fine detail. That's not a good approach for getting likenesses. I've ...


10

There are a few aspects of the human face which will identify anyone. Shape of the head length of jawline Height of forehead (from brow to hairline) distance between eyes depth of eye sockets shape of cheekbones length and width of nose Length of chin (from lower lip to jaw) The more of these you get accurate, the more likely it is a portrait will bear a ...


10

I'd forget Photoshop and stick to Illustrator. They are all simple lines. All you need is the pen tool.


9

These small simplified images representing things are called pictograms (they're sometimes called icons but that also makes implications about how they are used). See also What do you call these infographic icons? which discusses a different style of the same thing. You can browse thousands and thousands of pictograms like that at the noun project, and ...


9

Add an anchor point to one of the line segments, say, the vertical segment, at a specific distance seen from the corner anchor point (p1), and then use the Direct Selection Tool (white arrow in the tool panel) to move the original corner point the same distance along the other line segment. Then choose the Convert Anchor Point tool (Shift-C) and click on ...


9

Using blend is the way to go. Blends over complex curves aren't easy to control though—you end up with something like this: An easier way is to create your blend on a straight path and create an art brush form your blend. Controlling blends with varying strokes also isn't easy so I would suggest using 2 separate blends. Create your first blend: ...


8

The easiest way is to get the new Photoshop Yes, finally, at version 13, in Photoshop CS6 each Shape can have a Stroke. It can be dashed... took them 13 versions of Photoshop but they finally came round to it P.S. - It also has lots of new great stuff. Moves kind of slow on my laptop, but still.. I recommend it, have a look at these videos to see the new ...


7

Try using Text tool and play with it's options. -------------- _ _ _ _ _ _ _ – – – – – – – –


7

There's not really an 'effect' to speak of. These are just flat line art, as @Scott mentions. I can add some advice to stick to very simple shapes, a single colour and one single thickness for all your strokes. Be sure to round most of your corners and select a round end cap in the Stroke panel.


7

The pen tool is going to be better rather than drawing each line individually. However, you can take your paths and combine them into a single path by selecting them and going to: Object -> Path -> Join and then you can round that path by going to: Effect -> Stylize -> Round Corners... alternatively, once the paths are combined you can ...


7

Step 1: Draw a few strait lines as shown in the image. Select them all and create a artbrush. No settings need to be changed. Step 2: Draw your circles. Keep in mind that they need to touch each other. Select the two circles and choose the newly created artbrush from the brushpanel. Step 3: Keep the 2 circles selected and expand them (Object > Expand). Now ...


6

Create the line using the pen tool. Then in the 'Appearance' panel, click 'Stroke'. A bunch of options will appear. Play around with the 'Dashed Line' section to adjust the length of your dots/dashes on your line.


6

Click on stroke (highlighted). one drop-down will appear. you can play with options.


6

The bars in the pattern are actually not of exactly the same width. Some bars are slightly thicker, adding a darker mean shade to the image in that location. This way the picture is visible by just a slightly darker mean color (like 50% brightness for the bright regions and 52% brightness for the darker regions). You can do this in photoshop, if you start ...


5

Sure! Use the Appearance Panel. You can stack multiple strokes (or fills) onto the same path which is much more precise, clean, and editable than anything Photoshop can do. For more information on the Appearance Panel CLICK HERE.


5

Align objects To align a line to the center of an ellipse left side we can use the Object > Align and distribute tools. Align the top of the diagonal line to the vertically centered horizontal guide in the ellipse. Align top edges Align the left borders of the diagonal line and the ellipse. Align left edges Snap to nodes or handles while drawing ...


5

You don't. Pulling or dragging something to straighten out a multi-curved path is not possible as far as I'm aware. You could move each and every anchor point, but then you'd be hard pressed to not alter the length of the curves as you moved points. You can get the length and draw a new path. Choose Window > Document Info, then in the Document Info ...


5

Use Adobe Illustrator Draw a series of lines. Make them an Art Brush. Apply the brush to paths. Expand, edit and color.


5

create your shape give it a stroke select PATH >> STROKE TO PATH You now have a new shape that has the form of your path to which you can apply a stroke and fill to.


4

It's a style meant to emulate old engravings (look at the portraits on american paper money for an example). Traditionally it was done by an engraver, cutting into the plates. The example above appears to be done via a PhotoShop filter. There's several on the market that can do that. It's often a form of a halftoning filter.


4

Why can't aesthetics be enough of an answer? There isn't any physical depth there. It's all smooth plastic. The lines are merely for visual interest. Pinstripe patterns have always lent a traditional aire of elegance to many things. They serve to break up a wide field of color - if the plastic were merely white, there's no interest. If it were merely grey it ...


4

Different answers will work here; here's something I did in a matter of about a minute. Select the Polygon Tool (Click and hold the Rectangle Tool in the Tools palette if you're not sure how to get it) and click on the canvas; give a 20px radius and 6 sides and press Enter. Toggle Smart Guides (Ctrl + U) and select the Line tool (\ on the keyboard). Draw ...


4

There is no control in Illustrator to set the stacking order of various parts of a continuous stroke. You have to go old-school and manually adjust the stacking. To that, you'll have to cut the stroke into multiple paths, or duplicate and mask the "over" versus "under" parts. As for how the layering work, it is based on the path direction. First drawn ...


4

I'm not sure of what you want, but you maybe you can: draw a single line, with a large width (like 5px) then convert it to a path (Menu Path -> Stroke to Path), then remove the fill color, and set a stroke color, reset stroke with to 1px and remove the "caps".


4

Draw the rounded rectangle then choose Object > Envelope Distort > Make with Warp > Inflate To get it back to a standard path afterwards, choose Object > Expand from the menu.


4

Illustrator is a perfectly viable option for a CAD application (as is Inkscape), in small volumes. The basic difference is that you would not draw the image in 1:100 scale in a CAD application*. Rather you would draw in 1:1 scale and then the print view would be in scale. This speeds up the process since you can just type measured units. The trick to ...


3

Some portraiture artists skip over any attempts to contain the face inside the more dominant geometric structures of the skull too early on. Instead they concentrate on five or six points of reference that are key to identifying what it is that's subtly different about that person, and map them out immediately within a barely discernible 3 dimensional box ...



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