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13

Rounded dotted lines are easy,(using a round brush as base) just setup the spacing bigger in "brush tip shape" settings. When wanting dashed ones, add square tip brushes if you havent got there, it comes default in the "load brushes" list at brushes window (accessing from right top corner icon in this brushes window). Choose a square tip brush. In brush tip ...


10

I'd forget Photoshop and stick to Illustrator. They are all simple lines. All you need is the pen tool.


9

These small simplified images representing things are called pictograms (they're sometimes called icons but that also makes implications about how they are used). See also What do you call these infographic icons? which discusses a different style of the same thing. You can browse thousands and thousands of pictograms like that at the noun project, and ...


8

There are a few aspects of the human face which will identify anyone. Shape of the head length of jawline Height of forehead (from brow to hairline) distance between eyes depth of eye sockets shape of cheekbones length and width of nose Length of chin (from lower lip to jaw) The more of these you get accurate, the more likely it is a portrait will bear a ...


7

The pen tool is going to be better rather than drawing each line individually. However, you can take your paths and combine them into a single path by selecting them and going to: Object -> Path -> Join and then you can round that path by going to: Effect -> Stylize -> Round Corners... alternatively, once the paths are combined you can ...


6

Just want to add a more general point about your approach. It looks like you're closely copying the details, and hoping that a likeness will spring out when you add enough accurately copied fine detail. That's not a good approach for getting likenesses (I've made that mistake many times, it doesn't work). For example, in the forehead, each individual ...


6

Create the line using the pen tool. Then in the 'Appearance' panel, click 'Stroke'. A bunch of options will appear. Play around with the 'Dashed Line' section to adjust the length of your dots/dashes on your line.


6

There's not really an 'effect' to speak of. These are just flat line art, as @Scott mentions. I can add some advice to stick to very simple shapes, a single colour and one single thickness for all your strokes. Be sure to round most of your corners and select a round end cap in the Stroke panel.


5

The easiest way is to get the new Photoshop Yes, finally, at version 13, in Photoshop CS6 each Shape can have a Stroke. It can be dashed... took them 13 versions of Photoshop but they finally came round to it P.S. - It also has lots of new great stuff. Moves kind of slow on my laptop, but still.. I recommend it, have a look at these videos to see the new ...


5

Add an anchor point to one of the line segments, say, the vertical segment, at a specific distance seen from the corner anchor point (p1), and then use the Direct Selection Tool (white arrow in the tool panel) to move the original corner point the same distance along the other line segment. Then choose the Convert Anchor Point tool (Shift-C) and click on ...


5

Sure! Use the Appearance Panel. You can stack multiple strokes (or fills) onto the same path which is much more precise, clean, and editable than anything Photoshop can do. For more information on the Appearance Panel CLICK HERE.


5

Click on stroke (highlighted). one drop-down will appear. you can play with options.


5

Align objects To align a line to the center of an ellipse left side we can use the Object > Align and distribute tools. Align the top of the diagonal line to the vertically centered horizontal guide in the ellipse. Align top edges Align the left borders of the diagonal line and the ellipse. Align left edges Snap to nodes or handles while drawing ...


4

Why can't aesthetics be enough of an answer? There isn't any physical depth there. It's all smooth plastic. The lines are merely for visual interest. Pinstripe patterns have always lent a traditional aire of elegance to many things. They serve to break up a wide field of color - if the plastic were merely white, there's no interest. If it were merely grey it ...


4

Draw the rounded rectangle then choose Object > Envelope Distort > Make with Warp > Inflate To get it back to a standard path afterwards, choose Object > Expand from the menu.


4

It's a style meant to emulate old engravings (look at the portraits on american paper money for an example). Traditionally it was done by an engraver, cutting into the plates. The example above appears to be done via a PhotoShop filter. There's several on the market that can do that. It's often a form of a halftoning filter.


4

I'm not sure of what you want, but you maybe you can: draw a single line, with a large width (like 5px) then convert it to a path (Menu Path -> Stroke to Path), then remove the fill color, and set a stroke color, reset stroke with to 1px and remove the "caps".


4

There is no control in Illustrator to set the stacking order of various parts of a continuous stroke. You have to go old-school and manually adjust the stacking. To that, you'll have to cut the stroke into multiple paths, or duplicate and mask the "over" versus "under" parts. As for how the layering work, it is based on the path direction. First drawn ...


4

Illustrator is a perfectly viable option for a CAD application (as is Inkscape), in small volumes. The basic difference is that you would not draw the image in 1:100 scale in a CAD application*. Rather you would draw in 1:1 scale and then the print view would be in scale. This speeds up the process since you can just type measured units. The trick to ...


3

In my experience, one of the main reasons a border looks ugly is it's too heavy. "Heavy" is created by thickness, of course, but also by too much contrast. A black line on a white background must be thinner than a light grey line to avoid looking too severe (unless you're trying for the "prison camp" look). Another reason that a border (or a rule) will seem ...


3

Try using Text tool and play with it's options. -------------- _ _ _ _ _ _ _ – – – – – – – –


3

You don't mention any particular software, but if you want to do this manually it is a similar process in Photoshop, Illustrator, Gimp or Inkscape: Open or paste your image in a new document Lower the opacity of this first background layer so you can work on top of it. You can also convert this layer to black & white so it's easier to tell the ...


3

Different answers will work here; here's something I did in a matter of about a minute. Select the Polygon Tool (Click and hold the Rectangle Tool in the Tools palette if you're not sure how to get it) and click on the canvas; give a 20px radius and 6 sides and press Enter. Toggle Smart Guides (Ctrl + U) and select the Line tool (\ on the keyboard). Draw ...


3

This is a bit broad, not knowing the style of coloring you are after. If you merely want flat solid colors, then Illustrator's Live Paint Bucket Tool will handle that just fine. Select all, grab the Live Paint Bucket Tool and start clicking. If you want more painterly color (and it sounds like you do) then Illustrator isn't a good tool for that. I would ...


3

The example you show, is simply from a Shutterstock vector file. There are also fonts out there made of human shapes If you still want to draw this yourself, you have a few options. These all require you to have a photo or other image of the shape you want: Trace: Draw it manually, paper and pen, then scan, then trace Find or take a photograph you can ...


3

The image that you're showing is actually a hand drawn sketch and not a filter effect so unfortunately there's no easy way around it. You can create similar effects using filters on photo's but never that good. You could also try using the Threshold tool Image>Adjustment>Threshold and adjust the settings until you get an image you're happy with:


2

I'm assuming you are using Photoshop. You didn't tag your question with that, or mention it, but since it's the most popular tool... If the background is transparent: Command/Ctrl-click the layer thumbnail in the Layers Panel to create a selection. Click the "Make Work Path" button on the bottom of the Paths Panel. From the menu choose Layer > New Fill ...


2

"Wall Street Journal style." :) Also referred to as woodcut and the WSJ's proprietary HedCut. If you Google "wall street journal illustration style" and read some of the articles, there are suggestions about how to recreate the look.


2

If you can keep consistent lighting in the photographs, for example, by having the same light point at the table and place the camera somewhere so you know you can always shoot the image in the same conditions, you could record Curves or Levels Action to do this (I would suggest Curves, since you want to have pretty exact results.) Then you could just open ...


2

If the artwork was just a stroked path, @Scott would be right. But from what I can see when I look at the SVG files, they are filled shapes: See the nodes in the corners? So you will need to Offset the path by a negative amount: Object -> Path -> Offset Path To end up with a thin arrow Or, just scale down the arrow until it has the appearance ...



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