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18

The Lowest Common Denominator vs. Highest Common Factor Approachâ„¢ Define how much available space you have by creating, placing, and balancing empty elements within your design. I chose to use the Golden Ratio for the above (100px x 161px) because it's better to work with a horizontal rectangle, than it is with a perfect square based on most logos being ...


8

I think in that particular example you should scale the two logos both to one reference which is the text ... because when it comes with aligning two logos having texts, you should consider the text proportions first. and in your example the two fonts of the logos looks similar. align the text to the same base line scale the two text in logos to have the ...


7

Bathroom icons don't describe what you do in there, they describe who goes in. It's become a universal sign for restrooms as it's one of the few spots that's segregated by sex in most locations. But it can work equally as well for showers/changing rooms.


7

User experience is more important than precision. Take the phone icon for example. Phones haven't looked like this for a long time, but the icon is still very effective for communicating. The two concepts you are trying to communicate are shower and woman. Luckily, there are common icons for both so it's most communicative to just combine the icons. ...


6

I work at a nonprofit and have to do this frequently when including sponsor organizations, etc. on flyers and invitations. What I generally do is start by sizing the logos so the type sizes are equal, and then tweaking individually based on the overall size of the logos in proportion to eachother.


4

I have also had to do this frequently and it gets really difficult to keep the printed piece from looking like a NASCAR race car. My process is that I start by making things the same size and then tweak them by eye (sometimes using "soft eyes" - defocusing so you only see "blobs") so they are visually balanced.


3

Short answer: no, you can not edit an EPS from a vector application directly in Photoshop. Slightly longer and more meaningful answer: You can not directly edit the vector shapes, points, lines, or fills of an EPS file saved from a different application inside of Photoshop but you can manipulate colors and appearance using Photoshop's adjustment layers and ...


3

The easiest way is to change the image to Indexed Color instead of RGB via Image > Mode. All transparent pixels will be removed and none will be created when the image is downsized. Alternatively, you can duplicate and merge the downsized layer repeatedly. Even a pixel with 1/256th opacity will be opaque after 8 iterations.


3

When you want to make your work "free and available" to anyone online you should mention how it is free. It is not a term of use nor a copyright. It is simply "access to knowledge". You have 6 licenses in Creative Commons and all are related to any work not only software. You can choose how to make your work available in specific way. And there is an online ...


2

It all depends, but often, for large branding projects, the logo may have a Pantone specification, a CMYK specification, and an RGB specification to handle all scenarios.


2

Those examples are type ornaments or electrotype ornaments and are often called dingbats. But they are derived from 19th century woodcut illustrations. So, the style is generic dingbats and letterpress ornaments. Electrotyping is a depositional process, so the inverse of etching or engraving (because they were used in-line on a letterpess). However, they ...


1

It's mostly engraving. The best way to emulate is to create your own engravings, though that is a particular skill few of us have experience with. The hallmark of the style is that it's pure black and white and all shading it done via pattern...typically patterns of differently spaced lines that follow the contours of the 3D object being illustrated. ...


1

Identification - It can fall under: Line Art Scratchboard Hatching Something like this I would personally do-it manually with a 0.05 pen. If you can't try some simple Photoshop crosshatch brushed like this one


1

By far the fastest and easiest way is to do a reverse image lookup in Google. Here's a link to Google's Search by Image functionality: http://www.google.ca/insidesearch/features/images/searchbyimage.html Google will look for similar colours, shapes, and patterns in other images across the internet. Although it may find images that aren't logos at all, this ...


1

The only difference between your 3rd and 4th logo is the typeface. 4th looks better, that is because the thickness of the font is almost the same as the thickness of the golden outline. Use that typeface in 5th logo, it might look even better. Try this on the all the logos and see which one looks the best to you. Always look at this detail. Rest all looks ...



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