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11

There's two questions here. Let's start with the first: Why do people use the golden ratio? Because they are lazy, or just blindly following advice without putting a lot of thought behind it. The reality is that the Golden Ratio is mostly BS. Well, BS may be a bit harsh, maybe a better term is that it's mostly arbitrary. Connections to Roman ...


6

The essence of good kerning is to achieve an even appearance to the letterspacing in a word. It's a visual, not a mathematical operation. There some really hifalutin' rules to this, but they tend to be more academic than practical unless you're experienced with typography and/or a type designer. Here's a basic rule-of-thumb kerning exercise that will get ...


5

Actually it's not bad. There are some things to fix in my opinion. The dots + lines logo it's a bit confusing, especially if you try to use it in a real small version. Keep in mind that thin lines in a big logo will reflect in a "really hard to see lines" in a small one (favicon). You should try to use less dots so to be able to spread them in a bigger ...


5

You're asking a very broad question but I will try to help you in the best way possible. Creating a logo for a business card? Design business card with client information Buy card stock typically 100lb. Run said card stock through printer Set reg. marks and print the business card (print more than one in case there is a print issue or you mess up ...


4

It's not that circles or golden ratios are some kind of required constant in logo design. What are constant in effective design are proportionality and similarity (or, sometimes, contrast). There are many natural ratios on which to base proportionality. The golden ratio is one, but there are also 4:3, 3:2, 2:1, 1:1, 1:3.14159 and many others. Simple ratios ...


3

I once attended a logo unveiling for a huge client, presented by a somewhat famous 'human interface designer' or some self-styled title. He had designed a number of things in various forms (though not logos), and considered himself a rockstar (don't most Creative Directors though?) I always considered him a bit of a tool, and as we were kind of competitors, ...


3

In context By that, a logo is rarely sitting all by itself. It's usually part of a bigger presentation--be it on a web page, business card, side of a truck, etc. So, I try and show the logo as it would be used. As to what that specifically is, it all depends on the client. Some clients will get an emailed PDF of a mocked up business card. Some clients may ...


3

He's the client. What he wants is final even after you've explained. You've done all you can do, now you need to follow his instructions or decline the work. While you always want to do "portfolio-worthy" work, your portfolio should never be a reason to tell a client "no". Your promotion is not the primary thing you should be worried about. You should be ...


3

A few leads: Watch out for the ratio symbol/typography. Right now your symbol is huge so if you had to stick your logo on something small, it would likely be illegible. If you make that line of text bigger, it might become a bit long so putting things on two lines (Blue Tree/Logistics) might be a good thing. The gradient on the leaves seems a bit much to ...


3

There is an actual symbol for twins (gemini) it looks like this alternatively i'd use something like this:


2

General tips: Try and avoid black outlines (LTL steel). They're default and give easy contrast, but I find they also radiate amateurism (the default outline left as is), unless you have a very good reason to introduce them. Create a three- to five-colour palette before starting your design, and use only colours from that palette. Only introduce black in ...


2

Why not use Microgramma Bold font? S pretty similar...


2

In the 5x5, the dots visually blend together and I see it as a 'patterned square,' not connected dots. The lines further blend the dots together. I much prefer the 3x3. You may also want to try removing some of the dots within the grid. The contrast on the connecting lines is very low. Try spacing the dots out a bit and making the connections the same ...


2

Without seeing the actual logo it's not possible to give a definitive answer to this, but importing it as a Shape Layer or vector paths would be the best way to do it if it's a simple logo, because your PSD would then contain live vector shapes that would output cleanly to PDF. When you import a vector logo (or any other vector) as a Smart Object, Photoshop ...


2

The process could involve 3 or 4 mini presentations working up to the final. In illustrative design you would roughly follow these steps. Present your sketches (can be rough pencil on paper) with the client you'd pick out the ones to push forward. Ideally both of you would have good reasons for picking them "it suits the business because of X an Y". ...


2

It's pretty easy to find a correlation between the golden ratio and the proportions of natural forms, e.g., plants and animals. Of course, the growth of natural forms is subject to variability caused by, for example, environmental factors, so you will never find a perfect correlation. Likewise if a designer consciously uses the golden section to design a ...


1

@born2DIE It would be good if you provided a sample image of your logo. In addition to what @joojaa and @hsawires have said, try the following: Even AI doesn't really support 3d! I Assume you are using the "Extrude & Bevel" tool (Effect > 3D)? The best way for SVG Compatibility is to break up complex objects into their composite paths. You can do ...


1

Just my opinion, since this is a subjective question..... Take it all with a grain of salt. The "lines" are pointless. They do absolutely nothing to elevate the mark and, in fact, do more to confuse the mark. In order for the lines to be effective, they need to be thinner than the dots and to that end, they have gotten so thin they are either impossible to ...


1

General comments: It's hard to say. May not be an easy-to-remember name. Will people be able to remember the URL easily? I'd suggest coming up with some alternative names if possible. The mark is nondescript and rather generic. I don't think it adds much to the logo. It's perhaps superfluous. The type is overly letter-spaced. Typically, the narrower the ...


1

I like presenting logos in an environment. It's easier for the client to visualize how the logo would work with various mediums. It also doesn't hurt to provide a brief guide along with it breaking down your thought-process at least with minimal explanation. I do like it when the clients discover things about their logo they like or hadn't realized without ...


1

for me I would present the logo as a story. from the concept to my old tries and the final version. and I would present the final one in many version. ex. when it presented as B&W and full color with (color pantone), when i converted to a 3D model and revolve over the screen, and I would choose some media like stationary, t-shirt, over a building ...etc ...


1

I made a logo for my parents once. They hired a sign company to get a custom fabricated laser-cut metallic sign built. They spent a lot of money and were very proud of it and excited to show it to me in person. I showed up and looked at the sign and said "Umm...that's not your logo. They swapped out the typeface.". My parent's replied "Oh, they couldn't ...


1

Cou can look for inpiration online, if you want to do it by yourself. http://logopond.com/search/?search=photography http://abduzeedo.com/logo-design-cameras http://abduzeedo.com/logo-design-cameras-part-2-0 http://www.pinterest.com/explore/camera-logo http://inspirationfeed.com/inspiration/logo-inspiration/51-clever-camera-and-photography-logo-designs ...



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