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21

I am not a trademark attorney which is really who you should ask. My understanding is the ™ is merely an indicator that the mark is being used in an effort to register it. ™ means "We intend to make this an ® when unique usage has been established." ™ does not provide any legal protection, it merely is a notice to infringers that the user may intend to file ...


9

Part II of the Terms of Service states YOU MAY NOT: [...] Use any Image (in whole or in part) as a trademark, service mark, logo, or other indication of origin, or as part thereof, or to otherwise endorse or imply the endorsement of any goods and/or services. The license comparison page states the following: What is not allowed with ...


9

Perhaps you failed to notice "Copyright: PureSolution" on the Shutterstock page. In 99% of all cases you can not trademark or copyright royalty free artwork. What you "purchased" was the right to use the artwork in a limited fashion not ownership of the image. You should read the agreement for any stock image service you are using. Reading the Shutterstock ...


5

I like the logo. A couple of comments though: I don't mind the type, the first half seems a little too round, but the CAD reminds me of the annotations on blueprints, which is (I think) a nice association. Perhaps you could investigate what other blueprint fonts there are out there that give the same feeling for the lowercase part as well. What I would ...


4

I'll give one piece of fairly specific advice on the logo which I liked best (The horizontal jug of 'hooch'). Choose between the ampersand and the 'nested' Co because it takes too long for the eye to make sense of this lower half. I personally would go with a small but full spelling of company ascending at a parallel angle as Hooch (moving the ampersand a ...


4

What your client means is that the logo you create has to be scalable. So you are not supposed to use raster graphics, as they would lose quality when you resize them. Because you are using Illustrator, if you created your logo with vectorial tools (drawing your shapes, for example), that should be enough. As long as your client has access to the original ...


3

You should first convert your font to an editable vector shape (you can do this easily in illustrator) then you just need some small changes in that to make it a great logo. For example just look at the Amazon logo: a small curved line under the word and a tiny change in "z" letter, created a great logo!


2

I think section 2 sums it up fairly clearly (well, as clearly as licenses can be): Grant of Copyright License. Subject to the terms and conditions of this License, each Contributor hereby grants to You a perpetual, worldwide, non-exclusive, no-charge, royalty-free, irrevocable copyright license to reproduce, prepare Derivative Works of, publicly ...


2

Some tips I would use: rotate certain letters (see Heineken) mirror a letter (see Abba) skew a letter (for example capital A with vertical right side) change color or pattern of a letter (Google, IBM) browse "brand logo" for examples For backgrounds usually 2 colors are sufficient. Also remember that when it needs to be used for preprinted paper. A logo ...


2

It is merely drawn paths with gradient fills. There's honestly nothing complex in that image whatsoever.


2

this is essentially a long comment. Please remember that someone using CAD/CAM/CAE systems most likely needs to be able to print the logo as apart of a manufacturing drawing. These frequently do not have the ability to print gradients and even color may be out of the question. So most likely your logo needs to be able to fit in the title area of such a ...


2

CAD stands for Computer Aided Design. As such, the company is essentially 'CompuComputer...' Which is a little weird. But the name is what it is, so I think your logo in an improvement. The main concern with the old logo is that it's just very dated--namely the CAD typeface. It wouldn't resonate with any student today. Things to think about with your ...


2

I dont think the grid makes sense nor would fit the realm of print or embroidery.. When designing a logo you should think of every way possible that a logo can be viewed and you should consult the client what their intentions are in using their logo. If the logo is just for a website it might do but ask yourself if that logo were to be used in the header ...


1

I understand your question to be, how do you create a logo with the golden ratio? I feel as if your question is more theoretical than program based? Here is my theoretical answer and I will be the Devil's Advocate for the golden ratio here (as I believe many of the comments above don't completely understand the significance). Sketch on paper. That's how the ...


1

Before Edit: All five logos face one issue and that is they cannot be used for what I would classify as your target audience. Per your information Rooftop patio with yard games such as corn hole, washers, basketball hoop, darts 1st Logo Outside on a rooftop this logo would be ideal for big large print. It could be displayed as a one color with ...


1

In this video have described exactly the way you want.


1

As Paolo mentioned befor, draw your logo (three stripes of orange boxes in this case), then distort the envelope, copy, paste, rotate and you're done.


1

It's drawn with the pen tool and filled with a gradient.


1

Do not trust the on-screen display of a print-ready .pdf. Ever. Seriously, any and all .pdf viewers have huge problems rendering print-ready .pdfs on-screen. One of the common rendering errors is indeed with hairlines between areas of different opacity, or intersected by areas of different opacity or blending. Mostly, these hairlines are artefacts of the ...


1

Pass #1 "Get it approximately right" -- Align as many edges of each character as you can to a 4-pixel grid before you resize. If you're pressed for time, the most important edges are the outermost edges of each character, and the horizontal internal edges. Shrink, (I used bilinear interpolation), down to 98x98px to check which edges are still ...



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