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37

The general principle: styles come in and out of fashion (sometimes due to technical limitations changing, often just because of whimseys of fashion). When a style goes out of fashion, it becomes associated with the era when it was in fashion, making things done in that style look of that era (therefore, dated). The halo effect of being in fashion can also ...


25

There are a few things you could try to do: If the logo is simple, make it monochrome to neutralize any garish colors. Depending on the logo, you may even be able to do so if it's more complicated. If they don't have the logo in vector format, you could recreate it, giving it a slight, but subtle refresh. This way you can improve any blurriness as well. If ...


24

Using Illustrator To create those branches of barley like that, you could draw them straight then create an Art Brush out of them: Create a new Art Brush Select your art, then Brushes panel click the New Brush button in the bottom right Apply the art brush to a curve The brush will nicely flow with whatever curves you apply it to


20

It probably has to do with how we perceive our state of technology and major trends that drive our society. Does it make sense? Sometimes, I suppose ... Look at the evolution of the BP logo. Throughout the year an outline and colour was added. Today it resembles a yellow and green sunflower probably referring to the customer's desire to purchase more ...


20

The WiFi part was immediately obvious to me. I think what's hurting the recognizability of the CD is the gradient. If you've looked at other CD renderings, the gradient is angular, not radial. via: http://www.psdgraphics.com/psd-icons/psd-compact-disc-cd-icon/ Here's what it might look like with an angle gradient (though I think a couple more color ...


19

My example is not a perfect, but you can take it as guideline for your logo-training. I hope this help you. 1) Create a new text layer 2) Take a pen tool and draw two lines so together they are looking like "a" 3) Turn text layer off, we don't need it anymore 4) Take "Ellipse Tool" and draw some ellipses. Now turn brushes window on. Select all the ...


16

I'm tempted to close this as "not a real question", but I'll try to humor you since you're only 10. If you have no graphic design skills, then the obvious thing to do is just to hire a professional to design the logo for you. Otherwise, you'll have to accept that the logo you design will most-likely be terrible. If there were a simple way (simple enough to ...


16

Universal/Cross-media useage Every logo has to work in black/white only. A logo needs often to be "cut". Logos attached to t-shirts, caps, cars & signs, so you need clean outlines for foil cutting. Which means: Keep it simple and your lines clean. No one can cut the lines you see in the pathview below. Your logo has to work even on low resolution ...


16

http://www.tineye.com/ is a great reverse image search. It basically searches through the internet to find images that are identical or very similar to your own. There is no perfect 1-stop-get-all solution, but it's a start. Edit Google images also has a feature now that lets you click-and-drag an image into the search bar and it will find all similar ...


16

Western language visitors read left-right, top down. Go to any Hebrew or Arabic website and where's the logo? Top right. The convention originates, I suspect, from letterhead design. Early websites were analogs of paper, and that analogy still dominates web design, although we're gradually weaning off it. The other common analogy, a store front, still has ...


15

I assume by "brandmark" you really mean a brand symbol/icon. If so, then the answer is "yes"; both word marks and brand symbols/icons are more effective. Each have their place, and a logo designer or brand marketer can't afford to exclude either from their repertoire. Would Apple still be Apple if they had only a logotype? Could you imagine IBM as IBM if ...


15

I would use half the width of the vertical for kerning between most areas (magenta rectangles) then the full width of the vertical on either side of the ls (orange rectangles). I would also shorten the height of the lowercase ls. The additional height of the ls is throwing off the balance considerably. Reducing the height of the ls to match the hight of ...


14

From a technical standpoint, ideally the logo should be readable on any of the colors that your office uses for that particular logo. The question of printing on white or black is typically necessary for certain branding principles, but in some cases there are examples that show certain designs that are required to be printed only on certain colors, and ...


13

Not much different from KMSTR's answer, but I'll say it anyways. Select the same original circle. Then from the top menu: Object > Path > Offset path. ( In this case you only need to worry about the "offset" box, and you might want to enable preview as well. ) Select the offset path and swap the fill color with the outline color. If you want to ...


12

The Bell Logo looking "old" is an opinion that I don't think is universally shared. Many would call Saul Bass's work timeless. Yes, it is rooted in a particular era, but not overly so. One could take that Bell Logo and stick it in a book of 80's logos and it would fit just perfectly. One could upload it to Dribbble today and it'd fit right in. Why? Well, ...


12

I would say that there are two main factors at play. 1. Perception of the technology to create the logo The logo that was possible in the 1920's compared to what became possible in the 80s, 90s, and today due to innovations in printing technology, digital tools, etc will influence what can be built and our subsequent perception. For example this black ...


11

On the point of contests in general, on top of what Farray's said I'll just add, do the maths: $490 prize for one person out of 1,109 entrants? Assuming all designs took just two hours on average and people keep at it as long as it takes until they finally win something, that'd give the designers participating in this system an average wage of 22 cents an ...


10

Depending on what you're looking for, there are a lot of ways to achieve harmony in an ecosystem of products and/or services. As JohnB said in a comment and as you note, Adobe Creative Suite and Microsoft Office are great examples: An example that came to mind was the case where sports blogging network SB Nation redesigned their logos. Below is a ...


10

If it is truly in the public domain (or has a public domain notice) you can use it for whatever you want. So yes, it's legal. It may not be all that smart, though, given that anyone else can also use it as their logo. You may lose a good chunk of 'uniqueness' in that regard depending on the particular market you are in. Using a public domain icon of a ...


10

For us to perceive it as a D, you need something on the left side. It can be a line, an arrow, whatever. Your example up there looks like two arrows because that's what it is - with no other line to trick the brain. However, if something is added to the left side, the human brain automatically connects the dots and fills in the rest. Examples of possible ...


9

I like to browse around at LogoPond to get inspiration and ideas. Once you figure out what you want, you can search for tutorials to figure out how to do it using the software of your choice. For a logo I would recommend a vector editing program like Inkscape instead of a raster one like GIMP.


9

To maintain brand identity a logo should generally have a set color scheme. Generally... Full color Two Color (if appropriate) One Color Reversed If you vary beyond this and start swapping colors for every projects you greatly degrade any brand identity unless the color variations are for a very specific reason. Think of any major brand... does their ...


9

The answer is to create your logo artwork as vector rather than raster graphics. You can then use this artwork directly for print work, or export raster artwork at the size you need for web graphics. While Photoshop has some vector support, if you have Creative Suite, Illustrator is the tool for the job. If you don't, then Inkscape (which is free) is worth ...


9

I was previously familiar with the MDN logo, but no your logo did not come to mind when I saw yours. Is it plagiarism? Yes, if you used the MDN logo for inspiration then yes I'd say that's plagiarism. But not a very serious case of it. Is it highly unethical? It depends, but probably not. A rounded rectangle with a thick black stroke isn't exactly ...


9

I like it! And once I read the post, I completely get the wi-fi + CD. Having said that, I didn't get the CD the first time. About the remote not being there, I think the wi-fi symbol is a clear enough message, I wouldn't change this to include a remote (it would deserve a different question too). Something I have (very small) issues with is the gradient ...


8

Nate implied this in passing but I think it's worth emphasizing: one of the key features for a logo is for it to be effective (readible or legible and recognizable) at very small sizes, medium sizes and very large sizes. Some designers make variations for different situations, but in general it should be able to communicate its message equally well as a ...


8

I'm not sure if there is any real answer to this question without more details, but I'll give it a shot anyway, since I think it's an interesting question. Here are some things to consider when choosing which should be more prominent: Which part (the logo or the text) is more memorable? The more memorable one should probably be placed first. Which one is ...


8

Edit: There was a better way to do Quick & Dirty #1. I have revised the answer with the improvement. This is now my preferred method. Like many Illustrator things, there are multiple ways to do this. The Quick & Dirty Ways Use these methods if the outline object is at the bottom of your layer stack and transparency doesn't matter. Quick & ...


8

That actually looks to be about a 7° angle (although it's not exactly 7°. It's like 7.1° or 7.2°). There are no hard and fast rules on angles I'm aware of. But generally, I try to stick to 5° increments. The real key to using angles which are aesthetically pleasing is to use them repeatedly in the same piece. One element at an angle will almost always ...


8

e100's advice is spot on. A vector application such as Illustrator is the best tool for logo design, whether you start on paper and scan it in, or work directly within the program. This isn't the whole story, however. Scalability doesn't just involve vectors; the detail in a logo must also be adjusted for the size of the finished artwork. Just as with ...



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