Tag Info

Hot answers tagged

38

Well, I would hate to go against the crowd here, but I totally disagree that you need to rethink your design. In fact, I think the reasoning behind your idea is very solid. The idea of using the fiber optics as a symbol for connectivity is clever without being contrived and most importantly, it gives you a gut feeling of "this is a technology company" while ...


35

It's interesting, but (I assume) It's really the three dots that is the tie into 'TRItium'. As such, I'd consider dumping both the circle and the hexagon. They seem superfluous to the concept. They are nice, but (and this is just my opinion) in the world of software, those tend to give off a bit of a video game vibe--which may or may not be your objective. ...


20

I suggest ditching the hexagon, as it adds no value. If anything, it's confusing. In chemistry, the first thought that comes to mind when I see a hexagon is "benzene ring". That's not what you wanted to draw, right? The alternate version of the hexagon, with oddly aligned edges, is completely disconcerting to me.


18

I'm thinking keep it simple, and concentrate on the typography. Tritium is a radioactive isotope of hydrogen with 3 nucleons. So maybe use two of the nucleons for the 'i's' and one 'floater': As Tritium is radioactive it decays, and so does the typography. Loose quick sketch but you get the idea. Logo should work at most sizes, with spacing adjustment ...


18

Okay others have good points, I would like to add a new one. The logo is size challenged in that the details are a bit too small. This may be a problem if you need to: work in small scales such as 24 x 24 pixel icons (or even smaller) Print a business card sized medium, you would now need the ring to be quite big for the dots to be visible. I think the ...


16

Mi opinion: Use the atom as a secondary asset only. Your last sample, the website with the type alone, is great. The colors are interesting, the word and its shape as well. The straight lines work, especially if you try for example with the atom in the background -see image below-. I see it and sort of get more both the speech ('soft') and engine ...


13

Something like this should get you started. The key is to imply motion by making the text appear to be trying to go somewhere. and because we read from right to left to right, make go from left to right. Note: the graphic is awful looking, but it is there to demonstrate a concept.


12

There are several ways you can represent "fast" in a logo. One way is to "italicize" the logo (text and/or graphics) which conveys movement. The more you angle the content, the more speed is implied. However, too much angling could distort your work. Adding lines behind the movement might help. See GiantCowFilms example for this. You might also consider ...


9

FedEx uses the arrow in their design: As other people point out italics often represent speed as well. Here's an image I found googleing for things that might help. This combines an arrow moving right (The direction that it is being read) with speed lines on the left (again, the direction it is being read.) In addition, the word "express" is in ...


9

Brands of the World has a critique section that does just this. "Post your logo to receive comments and ratings in 4 different subjects: Idea, Symbol, Typography and Colors. Mark useful comments as helpful to reward commenters. Post new logo version and see how ratings improve." http://www.brandsoftheworld.com/critique


7

The benefit of having your full name in a logo is that, well, your name is the logo. Nike has the benefit of spending hundreds of millions of dollars to train the public to know that a "swoosh" = Nike, but you don't have that luxury. Not yet, anyways! While using initials or symbols in logos can sometimes lead to more creative solutions or more distinctive ...


7

Not sure that the Hexagon in the BG is of much help and it might be just ruining the effort that u have put in. How about removing the BG Hexagon and just the three circles that can now be increased in size and used in the center of the circle. That would look way better. I am just attaching an image that is more close to what I am saying and that way it ...


7

Personally, I'd shy away from the pure yellow, pure(ish) blue colour combination. Nothing screams 'cheap' and 'pedestrian' to me like the use of two or three pure and saturated primary colours. Try and come up with examples of logos that do, and ask yourself whether you want to be in that kind of company.


5

I agree with 200_success about ditching the hexagon because it adds no value...and am also unsure how Tritium relates to a speech-synthesis engine as Scott points out. However, I like the atom graphic (which I think is clean & simple but interesting, particularly with the bit of incongruity that the electron adds); and I will assume for the moment that ...


5

The word Ā«TRITIUMĀ» is so cool. No need for an aditional Graphicmark. Focus on superprecise typography instead (like in the website mockup).


5

I have a different take on the subject. The logo should communicate something about the product, not the product's name (I am giggling at the thought of a Microsoft logo of an itty bitty pillow). The product is a speech synthesis program. I get that tritium is a chemistry based word and I like the sound of it, but speech synthesis has nothing to do with ...


5

Personally, I think you are way off track. There is nothing that tells me that the blue and yellow thingy is either fiber cable or "N", without your little explanatory rebus at the top. To me it is a company name with some blue thingy floating absentmindedly above. If you need to explain an image to a bunch of designers by making another much more ...


4

A luxury logo is a logo that is attached to a luxury brand. In that sense, there's nothing in particular style-wise that makes a logo luxurious. But lots of things could imply it: simplicity high attention paid to typography classic imagery 'luxurious' stylizing (think expensive implementation such as engraving, etching, gold plating, etc.)


3

I think it needs alot more work. To me it just looks like two tubes with little to no significance. You may be better off making a logo out of the company name and then adding embellishments. Sometimes simple is better.


3

General reaction to things that I can see: The mark is forceful and strong. I also get a very gothic 'death metal' type of vibe from it. Depending on the type of music we're talking about, that might be good, might be bad. The type doesn't seem to fit the mark at all, nor does it seem to contrast enough. In its current state, it feels that it's fighting ...


3

As much as I understand the confidentiality issue, it will be difficult to critique the positioning and type without seeing the whole thing. The E: With what I see right now, I don't get the e. It seems really top heavy and the curve at the bottom is weird (I'm guessing it's where you might have modified it?) Technically, I would be careful with the tail ...


3

Your question looks theoretical but when reading more closely it sounds like you are asking how to merge shapes in Illustrator. There are multiple ways to make an hexagon with rounded points. Here is one that gives clean results but depending on the value you pick, might not look perfectly rounded : Draw an hexagon using the polygon tool. You can click on ...


3

I think you're off the mark but not necessarily for design, though not necessarily NOT for design either. You're off the mark because you can't seem to justify the reason behind the shift. If you're changing someones branding you should have very sound reason to do so, it doesn't appear you have that. See this question and the answers as possible help on ...


3

I see no reason why not. The entire world is not so contract-obsessed as the US, so unless you have a massively complicated contract that mentions this (and that to me would be wildly bizarre), go ahead. You should also be able to put the logos that are in use in your portfolio too. That is kinda what a portfolio is. And fictional logos? Absolutely. It is ...


3

My comment as an answer: Yes, it's quite fine. The only thing I'd make sure though, is that the logo ends up being vector in the end, rather than a raster image of a 3D rendering. Which would often mean that if you originally make it in 3D application, you'd potentially need to recreate it or at least finalize it in something like Illustrator. ...


3

Reddit can be a bit hit or miss with these things, but it's worth a shot: http://www.reddit.com/r/design_critiques http://www.reddit.com/r/logo_critique


3

Yes. In addition to other suggestions already offered, don't forget...this site. To zero in on logo critiques, search specifically for them. Also, be sure to review guidelines for asking a great subjective question before posting a question to invite critiques - if you are not already familiar with them.


2

We aren't usually a brainstorming site, but I'd like to give you a few of the ideas that popped in to my head when thinking about this. I would either be going very literal, or very abstract, but not a mish mash in between the two like you currently have. So two ideas, one literal, one abstract: You could create an image of the wiring itself, with the ...


2

Keep it simple, don't try to incorporate all the concepts that come to your mind in one logo. Focus on one idea. The less elements, the better (as a bonus your logo will be more easily recognizable and better reproduced at smaller sizes) . Also I don't think trying to please everyone will work; do what is the best for the logo design, you can't win ...


2

First, as some others have mentioned, the logo image is being displayed at a size different from its actual size. Doing that leaves it to the browser to perform the sub/supersampling needed to resize an image and browsers aren't awesome at that. Along with that, it looks like the logo file you are using is in fact a bit fuzzy. PNG is a good format here, but ...



Only top voted, non community-wiki answers of a minimum length are eligible