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Describe the logo and what makes it unique in a short paragraph. It is usually possible to include the logo in the same document.


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For one a detailed style guide breaking down the padding of the logo color and different uses of color or ordinations of the lockup. The more you give them the better because it will help them make a strong case about the logo and make it easier to get it trademarked. Also just ask a the lawyer what he wants he might want something special.


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you can try using path offset (object - path - offset). This will create an offset of the whole logo. You can just delete the anchor points for the points that don't need to be any bigger. You can also try creating a stoke only for the small parts of the logo and then use the width tool to widen the stroke to your liking. If all looks well you can expand ...


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Personally? I like it without the art. Your name, what you do (without the er). Clean and perfect keming. Bold red on a linen business card? (no raised lettering PLEASE) That'd be all kinds of wow. The only thing I'd suggest in that respect is to try about +5% kerning between letters. Solid, clear, professional. If you're going to have the art tho, the ...


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I know its off topic, but have you thought about using the words 'graphic design' and dropping the 'er'- just thinking it would allow you to expand your brand, employees etc


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As you probably know, a logo shouldn't be too complicated, should be easy to remember, and shouldn't have a buckload of text; your logos seem to have neither of those, and I must say I love all of them. If you feel like it, add colour too? If you're considering to add colour, I would suggest to stick to one - too many will make your logo stand out, but will ...


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It all depends, but often, for large branding projects, the logo may have a Pantone specification, a CMYK specification, and an RGB specification to handle all scenarios.


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Those examples are type ornaments or electrotype ornaments and are often called dingbats. But they are derived from 19th century woodcut illustrations. So, the style is generic dingbats and letterpress ornaments. Electrotyping is a depositional process, so the inverse of etching or engraving (because they were used in-line on a letterpess). However, they ...


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It's mostly engraving. The best way to emulate is to create your own engravings, though that is a particular skill few of us have experience with. The hallmark of the style is that it's pure black and white and all shading it done via pattern...typically patterns of differently spaced lines that follow the contours of the 3D object being illustrated. ...


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Identification - It can fall under: Line Art Scratchboard Hatching Something like this I would personally do-it manually with a 0.05 pen. If you can't try some simple Photoshop crosshatch brushed like this one


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I have also had to do this frequently and it gets really difficult to keep the printed piece from looking like a NASCAR race car. My process is that I start by making things the same size and then tweak them by eye (sometimes using "soft eyes" - defocusing so you only see "blobs") so they are visually balanced.


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I think in that particular example you should scale the two logos both to one reference which is the text ... because when it comes with aligning two logos having texts, you should consider the text proportions first. and in your example the two fonts of the logos looks similar. align the text to the same base line scale the two text in logos to have the ...


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I work at a nonprofit and have to do this frequently when including sponsor organizations, etc. on flyers and invitations. What I generally do is start by sizing the logos so the type sizes are equal, and then tweaking individually based on the overall size of the logos in proportion to eachother.


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The Lowest Common Denominator vs. Highest Common Factor Approachâ„¢ Define how much available space you have by creating, placing, and balancing empty elements within your design. I chose to use the Golden Ratio for the above (100px x 161px) because it's better to work with a horizontal rectangle, than it is with a perfect square based on most logos being ...


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I wasn't familiar with the name Octopod before seeing this. If the purpose of the name is significantly detached from the toy of the same name then I think you're OK to go with it. With the most recent design you've shown, I think having the eight dots in the circle is an elegant way of visually representing the name and worth pursuing. I feel that whilst ...


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Short answer: no, you can not edit an EPS from a vector application directly in Photoshop. Slightly longer and more meaningful answer: You can not directly edit the vector shapes, points, lines, or fills of an EPS file saved from a different application inside of Photoshop but you can manipulate colors and appearance using Photoshop's adjustment layers and ...


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I can't yet comment on AndrewH's response, because I just got my account, but I would agree that the best way to change the first logo would be to open it in Adobe Illustrator and use the Live Trace/Image Trace tool. There is no "simple" solution for the second, well at least as simple as the first, but a lot of playing around in Photoshop will hopefully get ...


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Bathroom icons don't describe what you do in there, they describe who goes in. It's become a universal sign for restrooms as it's one of the few spots that's segregated by sex in most locations. But it can work equally as well for showers/changing rooms.


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User experience is more important than precision. Take the phone icon for example. Phones haven't looked like this for a long time, but the icon is still very effective for communicating. The two concepts you are trying to communicate are shower and woman. Luckily, there are common icons for both so it's most communicative to just combine the icons. ...


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By far the fastest and easiest way is to do a reverse image lookup in Google. Here's a link to Google's Search by Image functionality: http://www.google.ca/insidesearch/features/images/searchbyimage.html Google will look for similar colours, shapes, and patterns in other images across the internet. Although it may find images that aren't logos at all, this ...


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Because these are raster images your best bet is to either: 1) Re-create the image to easily change the colors. or 2) Bring the images into a photo editor program and change the hue/saturation. There are also plenty of other color changing methods in Photoshop if that is the program you plan to be using. Color Balance Selective Color If you just want ...


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The only difference between your 3rd and 4th logo is the typeface. 4th looks better, that is because the thickness of the font is almost the same as the thickness of the golden outline. Use that typeface in 5th logo, it might look even better. Try this on the all the logos and see which one looks the best to you. Always look at this detail. Rest all looks ...


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The answer seems to easy too me so I guess I did not understood it well :) But did you try: Filter > Pixel > Mosaic?


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The easiest way is to change the image to Indexed Color instead of RGB via Image > Mode. All transparent pixels will be removed and none will be created when the image is downsized. Alternatively, you can duplicate and merge the downsized layer repeatedly. Even a pixel with 1/256th opacity will be opaque after 8 iterations.


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Unless your shape only contains 90º angles, it will have semi-transparent edges. The reason is that pixels are square, so Photoshop tries to compensate for half-pixels with transparency. I made a little diagram to show what I mean by half-pixels:


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When you want to make your work "free and available" to anyone online you should mention how it is free. It is not a term of use nor a copyright. It is simply "access to knowledge". You have 6 licenses in Creative Commons and all are related to any work not only software. You can choose how to make your work available in specific way. And there is an online ...



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