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0

You could give it a gradient overlay (from the effects panel, not the adjustments) Aset it to soft light. This wil fake shading and give it more of that round feeling.


1

To answer the question in practical terms (from my experience of working for a brand design agency): designer researches the company and competitors comes up with ideas/concepts and brand values creates a logo based on brand values and research mocks logo applications (mock up of the logo in various contexts like a website, a shop, a letterhead) ...


0

My guess would be that both of the examples you provided began with a hand-drawn sketch that was then scanned in and created in Adobe Illustrator. The book Lettering and Type is a good resource for beginning to explore custom lettering.


2

Along with all the other good answers here, please remember that you are creating a visual identity of a business that, ideally, makes money. This identity has the potential to be used for years to come. How valuable is the business to you or your friend? Surely it's more valuable than $99? If so, then invest well in the business identity. It's a crucial ...


5

Its important to understand that in essence your not actually buying just a logo. Sure, if thats what you pay for thats what you get. But ultimately, atleast if you want good impact, you should be buying a look and feel. You should also get instructions on how to apply that to your benefit, in different situations (Web, print etc... yes contracts still are ...


0

To put it very concisely, you need to evaluate what end game you envision with your change. In other words, what are you trying to achieve by changing the logo? My recommendation from my days as a consultant is to give your client a range of options to choose from, all of which achieve more or less the same goal. You know what you want to achieve and by ...


9

If you want a professional logo, hire a professional designer. Do not use one of the $99 logo web sites. If you want a quality logo, you want to be able to work directly with a designer so that they can get a completely understanding of your business needs and objectives and then walk through the entire process with you. You will not get that from one of ...


0

Some programs allow to set the transparency of an image after importing (InDesign, Illstrator, ...) - this is the easy way. If your software does not, try this: Open in Photoshop, double click on the Background-Layer (to make it a 'normal' layer), set the transparency and save it as .png file. JPG does not support transparency.


0

There are some resizing programs that have diferent algorithms than the tipical bicubic. The main diference is that this kind of programs try to preserve the sharp edges between colours (the bicubic aproach is to soften the borders) so, in this case becouse the type of gaphic could work. They don't perform miracles, but can help you to enlarge the image ...


1

If you want to use it for a web-page or a ruff sketch it is ok, if you want to print it you should not use it. Well, you can, but it would only be "good" at a certain width (1 to 3 cm i guess). I would suggest NOT to redraw it in Illustrator as you always ALTER it, which is never a good idea. In such cases you have to contact your client(?) to get a ...


2

From what you've stated, you're a little stuck for choices. As it's impossible to add pixel quality, improving the quality is tricky. Personally, in your situation I would print the logo as best as possible, then photography it as best as possible. Some photoshop editing, better quality. If you have a good printer and good camera, you should be good to go.


12

There may not be a good reason to redesign a logo if it is easily recognized and if the market generally has a positive opinion of the brand. In fact a better option would be to make subtle updates that keep logo pretty much the same but perhaps improve how it can be applied in different use cases. So make sure you have a good, solid business case before ...


0

I guess this is normal as long as your client will be informed about that and/OR a freelancer/company will not have any further commercial rights for the product they've created (say, selling or adapting for another work). Also, questions about who showcase the work in the portfolio should also be solved. But I would suggest you to not give up and try a few ...


0

A brand is not just the logo and the usage of visual elements. It is instead a promise of what users and buyers will get by using said branded company/organization. It's the entire experience, from the moment a user discovers the brand down to how complaints and feedback are handled. Brand is the ultimate user experience - it is the sum total of the company ...


3

It's context-centric, for the most part. It really depends on the particular business and the needs of the client. Let's take a restaurant. They need an identity. That could be: a new logo and be all that the job entails. Ideally, though, you'd get to talk with them some more and explain to them how a cohesive brand identity is important as it's not ...


1

Probably a good start is a good interview with the client. You can not (or should not) start designing a logo if you do not have a minimum information. For example, a logo for a electronic medum only, lets say a web site, can use gradients and shadows, but if the logo must be printed in a shirt, or must be phisically built in the exterior of an office ...


0

Government agencies tend to all suffer the same with their logos: trying to do too much and being too literal. As such, most government agencies don't really have logos as much as they have 'official seals'. What makes a seal vs. a logo is open to interpretation, of course, but to me, a seal tends to be: overly detailed usually always in a circle format ...


0

Is your artwork still in vector format? Your last uploaded logo looks pretty good but you may find something useful below. Saving file as a JPEG or PNG First go to file - save for web. I would suggest saving at high (Just remember that the higher the quality, the longer the load time for a web page). If your working file is a vector then you can export at ...


0

This blurriness is Illustrator's anti-aliasing when the shapes don't match the pixel grid. Turn on View > Pixel Preview to see how your image will look when exported. Then you can align the shapes to the pixel grid to minimize the blur. Here's an official Adobe tutorial on how to do it: ...


0

For a free, modern alternative to Helvetica Neue (mentioned by Scott), with some oblique cuts (like Novecento Wide), see Liberation Sans / Arimo.


-1

Use a web-suitable palette and that will help with the dithering at the boundaries


2

Expanding on bemdesign's answer: even if it were legal you would not want to use somebody else's concept/artwork as your logo. It would make it hard to enforce as your own trademark/brand.


1

As this is a legal question and as we are not your lawyer and finally as the answer can vary by location (different laws) - this question is unanswerable by us here at StackExchange. All this being said, if you ever find yourself asking "Is this legal?", it's usually a good sign to rethink your current design and try to come up with something better.


1

Is importing into illustrator and making a vector better? I'd suggest whenever possible to create your logo in Illustrator. Having the logo as a vector file will give you a great deal more flexibility when resizing a logo. If made as a vector, you can use the same file on a business card, and a billboard, due to the infinite scalability of vectors. As ...


1

Hey is there any standards I should know about when designing a logo No standards, but plenty of things to consider. For starters, where and how will the log be used? On business cards? Semi trucks? Billboards? TV ads? Faxes? Web sites? Etc, etc. What are the dimensions for making a logo for the first time in photoshop? The dimensions are what you ...


0

First, there is no standards "dimension" for designing a logo however you may think about logo "Proportions" which mean the ratio between the width and height. is it 1:1 , 1:6 , 1:2 or 3:4 ? ... etc. and when you render your logo to its final dimension you could scale it to any size you want. So the question you have to ask to yourself: what proportion ...



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