New answers tagged

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The subtraction of the inner circle can be reset, giving this result: (Btw, this only works after removing the circle from the group, or else Sketch just subtracts two circles from the rectangle at a different spot) As you can see, it kinda works, but there is a whole part of the inside of the circle again that is flowing outside of the boundaries of the ...


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Ask your profesional designer. But yes, the EPS is probably the one. Others are PDF, AI, CDR. Enlargin a logo "without distortion" could have a wide range of flavors. Normally the user is the one that distorts a logo. (The question was edited adding the word pixelation, which makes it more especific) Some explanations. The formats I mentioned are ...


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you can go check out openclipart.org Everything on the site is free for commercial use and of high quality as well.


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Find the connecting color. This is probably a medium purple. Use this color in between, or use a red-purple-blue gradient.


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I agree with CAI's comment that the logos look fine on the CD. How can I include both of these elements on the disc even though they don't match? I don't think you can do anything about it and I wouldn't alter a logo unless it was ok based on the companies branding guideline. It does help if you're working with a neutral colored background. I mostly ...


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Agree with the answer above (and CAI's comment)... I'd just add that the .ai and .eps (assuming you're referring to a vector .eps) are redundant. No need to provide both. Usually an .eps is best, as it can be opened by other vector apps (CorelDraw, etc), whereas .ai is the native Illustrator format. Also, I usually include a black & white (grayscale) ...


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To determine if these companies are reputable, I would suggest asking them for Case Studies and Client Testimonials. Ask if you can speak to any of their past clients for a reference.


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It really depends on what you want out of a logo. If you just want a nice graphic then many sources might be good. However there is more to consider when buying a logo. In the end, a good Logo designer often needs to interview you and access your workers. Likewise, you as a company often need the logo designer to explain logo rationale and usage scenarios. ...


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Good logos can cost anywhere from $5 to $500,000 and probably more. The price does not necessarily equate to the quality of the finished logo (look at the 2012 London Olympics logo!). Also, someone who has designed a great logo for a banking company might not be able to design a great logo for a community gardening organisation. You need to approach the ...


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I would say that the file types you mentioned are fine, but as to whether to send a CMYK/RGB version, that depends on the medium the work will be displayed on. If it's print media, you will want to make sure it's CMYK for the printer to match the colors as close as possible and RGB for digital media. 300dpi is the standard for print/CMYK and 72dpi (at least) ...


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Try something here : https://qrohlf.com/trianglify-generator/ If you don't want any triangles, just put Variance & Cell Size at minimum. You got quite some examples to try, and all of them are using radient, maybe it will gave you the idea. Plus, you can download them at the size you want. Maybe if you reduce the size to the IPhone screen & put some ...


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We need a bit more detail on how you're exporting your logo. What are the dimensions, what size do you want it to be displayed as, etc. Rule of thumb is to export your image at different sizes pending on what you want to use them as. While png's are lossless, they still pixelate at various sizes, so best practice is to export individual files for each use ...


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This is likely due to a size issue. While it's true your creations in Illustrator are vector images and do not pixelate, exporting other file types most certainly can. Check your document size and create a large version. You can then scale it down as needed when you export your file or redefine the size when in use. You should export your logo as a PNG file ...


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Another possible method is using illustrator. You can warp every custom shape using object > envelope distort > choose something here. If you make a custom shape in your form then apply this using object > envelope distort > Make with top object. The form will then be shaped according to the top mesh or path. You can alter it afterwards. This is vector ...


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Check the size,if it is in Points instead of inches then this could explain the pixelation. Try switching to inches and set it to at least 8.5 by 11. A PNG file preserves transparency,like if you didn't want the white background to appear behind it. A JPEG becomes pixelated when zoomed in,but if it has a high enough resolution then would be perfect for this ...


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The reason you want to give for graying out the logos is that they need to be downplayed in relation to your own branding and style. They are shown probably as examples of partners or some such thing, they are secondary to your product/company logo and should visually reflect that. You don't have to follow other companies brand guidelines in work that is not ...


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What you need to know is Brand Architecture. There are potentially 3 types of brand architectures which is nothing but a framework into which its brands fall. Your question has more than one brand architecture. Virgin brand follows "Corporate or Monolithic" Brand Identity where its sub brands share the same first name. Subsidiary is a very generic term to ...


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You should explain your logo. Instead of just submitting a logo create a logo guide which explains its colour and the design concept. You can also include mood board to show how you ended up with this. About the logo shape: Try adding some depth to colours by using gradients for each colour so that it gives shaded effect. You can also use shadows of one ...


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Follow the brand guidelines. They are there for a reason. I know it sucks but that's how it is. If you spent hours of your life creating detailed brand guidelines just for people to ignore it, you wouldn't be happy (I'm not anyway). If there aren't any brand guidelines (you should actually request these, not just search the company's website) then by all ...


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This is a pretty loaded question since there are 1000s of different design styles + people with different personalities, but here is what I think is the most efficient way to go about this. Portfolio logos are generally reflective upon your brand(you working) and I like to throw my personality in to it as well. You have to decide what you want the receiver ...


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Yes, as others have noted supplying you with vector and other formats is what you are paying for. I would add the need to create many size and color variations too. Think about the search, "your company name and logo" in Google. What will come up? If you tag several size and color options you increase the chance someone will use your logo AND you increase ...


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I need to use it for a web site, as a watermark on digital photograph as well for printing on photos, business cards, etc. Ideally you tell your designer your intended uses and requirements and they will tell you what formats you need, and what to use each for. CMYK & RGB You will need both CMYK and RGB versions of your logo. Generally, you should ...


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Your designer should supply your logo as vector artwork, in .eps, .ai or .pdf format for print-based applications. Ideally they will provide a positive and negative version of your logo, so you can use it on light and dark backgrounds. They should also supply you bitmap versions (.jpg or .png) for use on the web and social media.



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