New answers tagged

0

If you are using the logo for print then say it needs to be 5cm wide by 2cm high, be sure to have the export options set to 300dpi (good for print) not 72dpi (good for web, x2 for retina)


20

Cai is correct. I thought I'd add a visual answer as well. The reason this happens is that it's an SVG. Unlike a raster image where you control each rendered pixel, the rasterization of the SVG happens in the browser...so the browser makes these decisions. One of the decisions the browser has to make is when to do anti-aliasing. It will typically do this ...


0

You can use the select tool, looks like a dotted rectangle and select the "TM" and hit the delete button. You can then copy and paste in the registered symbol (easily if it's transparent and you can use the Selective Color tool if it's white).


9

Printing in multiple colours requires accurate registration to avoid unsightly gaps and is a concern when artifacts are composed from multiple sources. Similar concerns can occur even in digital products where limited precision arithmetic necessarily introduces error. The problem being avoid is one of inverse trapping - where deviation from the intended ...


33

Understanding rasterization and the painter's algorithm might help. One way of rendering vector graphics (graphics defined by polygons, instead of pixels) to pixels is to rasterize the polygons while running the painter's algorithm. The painter's algorithm is a bottom-up process where you first put down the background, they draw on top of that background ...


0

just a quick response to your post here. In my opinion the logo should work in all sizes, both large and small. However, if you've grown to really like your logo as it is now, you could consider to work a bit more with the elements, so you have the logo as is, but can "play" with combining the logo with a byline in different cases. One could say that you are ...


1

Yes and no. Always supply a version of the logo for use on dark backgrounds and a version for use on light backgrounds. But that doesn't necessarily mean inverting the colors. If the brand colors include a range of colors, some dark and some light then obviously you can use those for different versions of the logo, no need to extrapolate different colors. ...


0

Sounds like someone screwed up the White Sox logo. http://www.brandsoftheworld.com/sites/default/files/styles/logo-thumbnail/public/0019/1125/brand.gif?itok=kYcyEaLB Seeiously though, show photos of the cap, not some scribbles.


167

To prevent possible rendering artefacts. Without the notches you're likely to see the edges of the bottom shapes where they meet the edges of the overlaying shapes (on screen anyway, it's not really a problem when printing). You can see examples and explanation of the possible artefacts here: Image looks embossed when converted to SVG How to put one ...


0

maybe it's some of those fonts with modifications, can't be? This ones are the other screenshots: Street Corner Slab Bold font: This ones are the last ones: ITC Tyke Std Medium font:


1

It depends. If you are asking if you can use it as a logo for a company or product—no. They are essentially identical. If you are asking if you can put it on a t-shirt—you can do whatever you like. I see t-shirts with parodies of big brand's logos on a daily basis. But remember the company can still sue you. Wether they do and wether or not a court would ...


1

Place the image behind the circle. Select both circle and image. Right-click and select Make Clipping Mask (or press cmd+7).


0

You could try creating your logo in Printshop 3 but I imagine that would be pretty difficult since that program has little drawing tools to choose from. I would suggest you look at Inkscape (free) if you plan on creating the logo yourself. You will then be able to export in a variety of formats for print and web. Check out: What are the differences between ...


0

All original logo artwork should be created in a program like Illustrator that allows you to save the file as an EPS (vector) file. From the same program, you should be able to save/export your logo in different sizes and file formats like JPEG, PNG, etc. Photoshop files are made up of pixels, whereas EPS/vector files are made up of detailed vectors/shapes ...


0

There may not be angles that are considered preferred but it's common for angles to be used to create an unsettling response to the audience. Your question about the golden ratio would work the same way; if a pattern of geometry is repeated throughout nature, it is likely to be familiar with our psyche (comfortable). That familiarity is why coordinating ...


0

Yes you can. The text typed in Illustrator is vector-based. Just save your file as PDF, and make sure the font is included in the "Save Adobe PDF"-dialog when you save the file. There should be no need to outline the text as long as the font is allowed to be included in the PDF file. If you for some reason must make an EPS-file, you should outline the ...


4

Yes. Just make sure you outline your type first. Right-click, Create outlines To add to Vicki's comment, I usually save my "working" documents (with editable text) as .ai files. I then save my outlined, print-ready designs as .eps or .pdf files, depending on which the printer asks for. That way, you can always go back and change something if need be, ...


0

Meh, uninspired, try to make it work on one line. This logo doesn't seem like it belongs to a jam band, as the font looks more futuristic than granola. The logo should be a strong reflection of the band's identity. Try sketching multiple versions out on paper before jumping into the software. Don't be afraid to break the grid, a band's logo should convey the ...


0

Some really great points already made by other responders regarding the unecessary complexity of the first design here. The best advice is to work out more versions on paper before jumping into the software. Then, as you've done with the second version, creating your logo in black and white first is a good technique to solidify your design before color ...


0

Well, for my part I like it. I think it is professional and enduring in the sense that it has enough detail and is standable on a large scale. However, as you wanted critique, I think there is a slight sense of ease missing. The pattern design for example is good in its contrast, might yet seem slightly stiff, where it should open the very square and cut ...



Top 50 recent answers are included