New answers tagged

0

It’s a “catch light” from portrait photography. That is literally a reflection of the photographer’s flash, or in some cases, a special light that is meant to light up the eyes. When you look at the portrait, the catch light draws you to the eyes, making the eyes pop out. Illustrators look for details like these so that they can draw simple shapes, and yet ...


1

I think it is, psychologically, to do with the eye looking more "alive" and animated. If you can see reflections in an eye (which this circle represents), it must be well-moistened, which means the subject is blinking, perhaps looking around, etc. The latter, without the reflection, looks kind of dead, or perhaps in a zombie-like stupor. I think this is ...


27

The circle (or otherwise white mark) is a meant to be a reflection. The reflection makes it more realistic and understandable as an icon. As seen in a google image search, our eyes are pretty reflective and we often perceive this even if we don't consciously think about it. As Andrew H notes, this reflection is called a catch light. Below is one for ...


1

Much depends on the contract and the price paid for the work product/rights. Our studio typically retains the copyrights, the client can register a trademark. Something we openly recommend. The reasons vary but the reality is when a client or anyone else (say for example a printer) modifies the work/product artistic and legal problems develop.


5

For logo work, no, this is not common. A graphic designer understands that a company needs to own their visual identity outright including with that to modify it in the future as they see fit. As others have stated, it's not necessarily a good idea but it absolutely should be within your rights as the owner of said logo.


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It is common for many designers to do this. If you only paid a couple hundred dollars or less, you might only be paying for the right to use their design instead of for the files themselves. Check your design contract if you have one to see what it says.


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Depends on your contract, graphic designers charge different prices for different rights to their work. What you are asking for is full transfer of rights, including all intelectual and moral rights. This is the sort of thing you need to have negotiated before you begin the job because it affects how the job is executed and whether or not the designer will ...


0

It might be a version of Space Colony https://www.myfonts.com/fonts/flat-it/space-colony/bold/


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As others have said, it's poor practice as a designer and I would personally be very unhappy. And there may very well be legal issues. The use of shutterstock images for a logo has been discussed here. The image on shutterstock says: Copyright: majivecka This is from the shutterstock license: YOU MAY NOT: i. Use Visual Content other than as ...


0

I think this is probably a matter of opinion. I know that I would be disappointed if I paid someone to design a logo and they used a stock vector. At the least, the designer should have told the client that they had found a stock vector they would like to use. The fact that it's a royalty-free image means there is no legal concern, but it also means that ...


2

TL;DR it seems they are inexperienced or unprofessional. I'd personally not feel comfortable and would cut my loss and find a more experienced designer. Stock photos and vectors are there to make people's lives a bit easier / jobs cheaper and quicker. Pretty much most designers use stock images or vectors regularly, this week for instance I've used some ...


1

Because of the black-white design it's really easy to clean it up: [These steps are written to be carried out in Photoshop] Remove text from layer Create path from logo symbol Change the path to whatever size you want (it's like a vector now) Fill the path with black That's it. It would be smooth as flan.


2

I like Pooka Studio better. It provides context, signifying that this is a creative studio. It’s descriptive. Are you referring to Celtic Mythology? If so, consider the alternate spelling “Púca” because it lends an air of sophistication. To me at least, “Pooka” looks a little child-like. Nothing wrong with that at all. But “Púca” seems the opposite: ...


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Poo sounds kind of like, you know, poo.


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That is a tough one, I would say it is pretty similar, especially since they are a bigger company... like @peter said, you can try it, but be ready for lawsuits. I have attached a link to another recent dispute... Disney V. Deadmau5


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If the client wants to use public domain artwork, suggest that they use a combination of 2 or 3 public domain artworks. When you put them together, they become something unique that you can defend a copyright on. You can see examples of this in military crests that reuse anchors and other generic elements, but they always have 2 or 3 put together in some ...


2

Some notes: First of all RGB and CMYK are not standarized values. I always mention one fast exercise. Take a cyan watermark and draw a line on a newspaper and on a good quality magazine. You will have a bright color on the magazine but a dark color on the newspaper. The ink is exactly the same, but the color is totally diferent. A color profile, besides ...


1

In designing a logo, you should always start with CMYK. The reason being that CMYK has a smaller colour gamut than that of RGB. The reasoning behind this is that when you are converting from CMYK to RGB to provide the logo for screen (eg. websites), the colours would have an unnoticeable shift in colour, if any. On the other hand, if you start creating the ...


10

You should supply both. Ideally you should supply screen and print versions in RGB and CMYK and in vector and bitmap formats. It completely depends on the situation and requirements but an example of formats to be delivered could be something like; JPG (RGB - high res & low res) PNG (RGB with transparency - high res & low res) SVG (RGB) PDF - ...


1

It should be CMYK and some prefer the use of Pantone colors to accurately convey the colors you intend to use in the logo. The reason why it should be CMYK is that RGB has a much larger array of brighter colors, which when printed will not come out the same. Short answer, CMYK or Pantone spot colors.


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Short answer: RGB. Unlike CMYK, RGB is standard (as far as I'm aware) across all displays. When you send the logo to be printed, they'll be able to fiddle with the CMYK colors until it matches closely enough.


2

Congratulations on your first logo. You will likely deal with more contractors in the future, so allow me to explain some fundamentals so you can ensure you get what you need in the future. Bitmap Images These are your every day digital images. Bitmaps are comprised of tiny squares of color (pixels) that together form an image. Example 1 If you have a ...


-3

You have to make sure you export your logo into ".png". This will make sure you're background keeps transparant. Are you designing in illustrator? Make sure it's a vector logo, issue to using your logo in different sizes and keeping it professional.


0

This depends on what phase your design is at, as detailed by StevieBoxall. I would usually produce a monochrome, inverse and full colour version at different sizes. Also, if there's text and icon segments of the design, split the text off to give a feel for the pure logo. One thing that used to provide a selling factor for me, was to provide a sample on ...


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This has been my process for doing branding / logo work for the last 5 years of freelancing... Initial Ideas - screen res jpegs / gifs Slide 1 • Mood board of where I have got my inspiration, this can also be photographs of sketches on paper (I generally do this if I think the client will like it, some do and some don't, you should get a feel for the client ...


0

Depends on the brief and the use of the logo. If it would be only Internet distributed you dont need it greyscale, and if would be branded on small media (like pencils or a lighter), for example, you need to show it how it looks like on 3x3 cm square. If your project is approved you would probably been asked to make a logo guideline in order to help the ...


0

Go easy on yourself, show it on white and black maybe grey, that's all. Show him in jpeg format. No need to show color palette.


-1

How are you showing the website to the client? With a rendering of a giant browser window on a giant graphics display? In that case, the logo will look very, very small to the client who is used to browsing the Web on a phone, tablet, or notebook PC display. I have seen this many times, when a designer sends a gigantic rendering with tons of white space ...


2

There’s a good article by Ira Kalb, Assistant Professor of Clinical Marketing, Marshall School of Business, University of Southern California, where he outlines these 5 succinct reasons: A logo that is too big comes with a lot of negative baggage including the following: 1. Inside-out thinking. Successful companies put the customer first and convey ...


1

My first guess would be to check your display settings: Display settings have no effect on the final output of your document, they merely control how detailed your images are displayed in-program.


0

Actually my question should have been something like this maybe. Sorry about using wrong product name in first place. I Found this from internet. So problem the real problem is (hopefully) getting logo to InDesign without losing quality. "I'm using the latest version of InDesign CC. I'm wondering why imported images look so bad, even when "Display ...


0

The greek god Hermes is my first thought, he was the messenger between the gods. But the only thing I can find vaguely relevant would be this:


0

The first thing that pops into my head would be FTD:


6

Sounds a bit like a chicken and egg conundrum! Is Google following trends, or creating them? The most likely answer is: Both (Google is a Schrödinger chicken!). I think the gist of it is the issue of brand identity and consistency vs change. The concept of a brand is that it should remain unchanged over its life - to communicate the continuity of its ...


0

I guess they see the value in being easily recognised, and simplifying the original idea over time. Coca-Cola and many others before it have followed similar ideas, whether it's it is a good example I am not sure. The digital era that we are in now calls for a logo mark that is easily adaptable on all devices and minimal in file size, something Google are ...


2

Assuming the logo itself is not up for discussion, I will say yes, you can use the r on its own. I think example #3 is the best one. 1 gets a little convoluted. 2 is rather boring and generic. I would also like to point out that 2 and 3 have "Lift" higher up and that works well. Lift - float - ascend etc., it emphasises the balloons (presumably) ...


3

You don't typically license a logo at all--as a logo is meant to represent a single entity. However, within the license of the software itself, you may want to add clauses about how the logo can be used (or not used) by others.


2

To me it looks like this was just one shape, then flipped upside down and backwards. Like this: If you combine that with Rishab's technique, I suspect you'll be able to mimic this style.


3

You could redraw it and use Stroke. It would make drawing and aligning the lines a bit easier. This will not work for all situations, but for this specific one... maybe... Use thin font as a guide to draw the N I used Bariol - Thin. Draw the orange line on top of it with the Pen tool After this you can get rid of the original N. Now you can ...


17

you don't need to use pen tool to create curls rather create the curls with the circle and delete the quater and make sure your stroke cap is set to Round Here's a quick tutorial on this: After creating your logo you can Expend your object and can use pathfinder to merge all shape in to one shape and then you can also apply some artistic effects from ...


2

If you aren't a type designer then the answer is probably not. It is possible, but if you don't already have and know these tools it can be a big investment of time and money for not much gain. What you gain from these tools isn't the ability to draw shapes better but the tools for working with kerning, hinting etc. Features that you need for creating a ...


7

Tools are only as good as the user using them. I can do vector drawings with notepad and in quite many ways I have better tools available in notepad than in Illustrator*. Possibly your question could have been better if you could have asked of a specific tool. Possibly, you can do whatever you want. Most of the time though font authoring tools dont have ...


0

Another option. I don't know Pixlr, but since you are able to save PNG with alpha, it appears to be a decent image editor. Export the icon from AI or Inkscape to PNG, as you have done previously, but with a very large image size (e.g. 10 times larger than needed) Open it in Pixlr, add solid background and make the coloured areas transparent Resize ...


0

There is a tutorial imitating his style here: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=it8jF089HA4 that you might find helpful. The person in the video is using Sketch.


0

Photoshop work with pixels and illustrator work with vectors so its impossible import the logo with photoshop effects and convert them to vector. If you redesign your logo in illustrator you can aply the same effects you use in photoshop, and if you need to use your logo in web you can also export your logo to svg then you don´t lose quality. You can send ...


3

So you are drawing your icons in Inkscape? Try this: If you are using lines of some width, use the "Path > Stroke to path" command to convert them into filled paths without a stroke. If you are using text, use the "Object > Ungroup" command to convert each text object into individual filled paths. If you are using filled paths, leave them unchanged but ...


1

If your logo is made up of all shapes and line then you don't need to do anything you can always increase the size of your images without loosing the quality. You can change the resolution, Width/height without loss of quality and you also do not need to transform your logo into vector format. I have never never created any image more that 300 Resolution in ...



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