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3

You already went one logo concept beyond what you agreed to. You should have specified that was out of scope and told them you were billing accordingly. A fourth logo is not a "revision" of the existing three. Now you've gone two concepts out of scope, plus you're developing the client-supplied logo. Bill hourly (or whatever your contract says) for the ...


0

Firstly, jsbueno's answer is better than this one. It's more complete, and exposes more of GIMP's powerful tool set. This answer is merely to show different ways of accomplishing tasks in GIMP. This technique might be useful if you wanted something a bit more stylized. Use the ellipse tool to select your outer-most border, and hit enter to clear ellipse ...


2

Type > Type on a Path > Type on a path options Tick the Flip box. Depending on what version of Illustrator you are using, dragging the I-beam across the path can be troublesome. The flip box does it easily and without the jerky, uncontrollable, dragging which can occur at times. But dragging, as cockypop suggest, does work as well.


3

Select selection tool, black arrow, V Click on the line (handle) in the middle of the text and drag it upwards.


0

Although I understand everyone's thoughts of going with the second version, I would not. Engravers Gothic is too widely used in luxury brand identities (Marc Jacobs, Acqua de Parma – to name a few)…thereby making it less unique. If you would like your brand to stand out among the rest, I would go with number 1.


1

A professional's guide to process Designing Logos: The Process of Creating Symbols That Endure This is a detailed, sometimes dry, but comprehensive work. Logo, Font, & Lettering Bible I hate recommending this one because it has to be one of the ugliest books in the business. Nonetheless, the author knows his stuff. The bigger picture Designing ...


1

It's maybe not so current (2008), but you want a book to helps you understand the ingredients of good logos (and not-so-good), Really Good Logos Explained by Rockport is great. A collection of 500 great logos critiqued by a panel of internationally acclaimed designers ...though that actually misses what's great about the book: they're not all "great ...


1

I would suggest devising your own exercises and practicing. Brands are fairly abstract so it might help to start with a more concrete topic. One assignment that I give sometimes is to illustrate a Jean de LaFontaine fable in negative/positive space. You could do the same with any movie or any simple story. Also, you might want to try some Escher like ...


0

If you want it just for a quick thing, you can always use double layers one for the square and one for the stroke, select the strokes and apply the "erase" blend mode, change the background to transparent and save for web, done. Another method that might work if the squares will be only one color is to use the convert to alpha live effect, I use this pretty ...


4

The principles for minimal logo design are good illustration skills paired with brand identity. The examples you gave are not logos but merely animal illustrations. It is easy to illustrate something that has a clear message, like "elephant", or "dog". And the clever use of negative space is simply practice. What makes this process so much harder for logos ...


3

Design is a form of communication, and the same rules apply as for any other. If it would be fine to say something to someone's face, you're probably fine saying it in a design. If it wouldn't, be prepared for consequences if you say it behind their back, or write it on a billboard, or draw it into a logo or icon. This is usually easier to judge for words ...


0

I would suggest you read the post that JohnB links to How to balance dignity with a calculated risk of offensiveness / tastelessness? However; I cannot see what is so racially offensive about the logo. Because it is red? The grin? The feather? People take offence, or try to bend over backwards not to offend, that they can find something wrong about ...


0

This is not a full answer, but usage of single-color (usually black on white) pictograms may workaround the problem where abstraction is allowed (icons etc...) Another approach (in less formal contexts) is to use blue or green heads/figures to bring an abstraction into skin color. Several companies in my country have such a figures/puppets as mascots or as ...


2

My experience is primarily in c++, and a mix of misc. high level languages. I don't do much work with .html or web work. From my experience the first two are the most semantically consistent: [] An array, generally a collection of items or data structure. This is probably why it was selected by code academy. It implies a collection of type code, ...


3

They mean whatever you want them to mean. They're just a decorative element. As you state, most of them refer to 'code' of some sort and have been used for the past couple of decades in tech company logos. In fact, they've been used so much for tech company logos that it might be almost cliche now to use it, so you may want to consider going a different ...


5

In all your samples (except perhaps the last one) they simply are a reference to web design/development. The use is similar to a wrench used in a logo for a mechanic or plumber - it's just what the trade uses so it's included as part of the logo. Note the word "code" in 99% of your samples, this is what the various brackets refer to. < > = html ...


0

A vertical shape like this logo+text does tend to look a bit lost in a wide horizontal space, especially centered. That's largely because it immediately defines three rectangles, two of which are in the opposite orientation to the logo and text. In order to keep the "bar and comic book lounge" text large enough to be readable, you also have to use an ...


3

Simplest answer: I don't think the logo looks terrible sitting above everything as it is. Simple answer: You could try floating the logo to the left at large and above and moving the menu up to fill the space. Complicated answer: You could think more about an identity system. A logo is not a brand; it's just a part of it. Think of how Coca-Cola has their ...


1

I suggest you to export an *.eps file from Sketch and simple open it in Photoshop without any resizing. After that take an option which is called 'Save for Web' (Shift+Cmd+Alt+s or from main menu 'File->Save for Web') and resize your image to get the dimensions you need. Listen to the dougajmcdonald and prepare the size you expect them to be rendered in a ...


2

As a web developer, I would say you should export the images at the size you expect them to be rendered. This is for two reasons: a) Filesize - a 2MB file scaled down in terms of resolution, still has to be downloaded at 2MB b) Rendering - a 1000x250px image which is displayed in a 250x50px tag, will be rendered by the browser at runtime. This is both ...


1

I would simply group the shapes and apply a radial gradient fill to the group. Note.. for a logo.. and for print (CMYK) the "overlay" blending mode is not going to give you the results you think. For CMYK really the only blend modes to use safely are Multiply, Color Burn, and sometimes Screen. All other blend modes will give you generally unexpected ...


1

I know this is a very old question but it may help someone in the future. My answer is only answering the "hard edge" problem from the gradient layers on top of the logo. A better way to do this that won't create the hard edges is to firstly remove the gradient layers completely (or hide them if you want to use them in the future). Then, separate the logo ...


17

That would be Pacifico: Open Font License, so a lot of ways it can be used.


1

In this specific case vectorization is not just easy its brain dead easy. Just: paste image in illustrator hit the live trace adjust live trace settings to 4 colors and set path fitting to 0 px Ignore white on expand object -> path -> simplify Angle threshold to 90 Straight lines. Now there is only one kink in the darker of the two transparent areas ...


1

Alright the lazy way: Open the first screenshot with the white background in photoshop. Magic Wand on White Delete Delete the Background Layer Save For Web End result with the History showing: I suspect you can do this in Fireworks too but I never touch that. I agree with others though that doing this in Illustrator as vector would be a better option. ...


0

Duplicate the entire group of objects. On the duplicate set, make all the squares 100% opaque and change to color to black, leaving the white stroke. (You can simply add a blend of color overlay). Add a full-white layer below for easier alignment, then flatten all the layers of the duplicate set along with the new white layer. You should now have a black ...


3

Your best bet is to use your current work as a guide and recreate the squares using opaque colors. This will also alleviate your intersecting problem. Create guides around your squares. Create squares using the selector or shape tool (vector might give you longer mileage)


1

Personally, I think it is hugely dependent on your audience. Children for example love characters, cartoons, animations, smiles and general rainbows, sunshine and happiness. (or at least that's what we condition them to like/like to think they like). So responsive characters and smiley faces are rampant in logos aimed at children. E.g CBeebies this is ...


0

I don't have any studies, but years ago I came across a website called Suicide Food. I don't advocate the viewpoint, but I think it is relevant to your question. Once you see what they are talking about it is hard not to see it in logos etc. everywhere. My personal reaction is humor and laughter, but I suspect the people who run/ran that blog are earnest ...


1

I don't think you can assert a matter of perception as a "law" which applies to everyone. I personally like shapes and symbols better than personifying everything - it gets a little cheesy after awhile. I think it is all about preference and execution. If you have a crappy mascot, it won't fly. If you have a crappy geometric logo, it won't fly either; but ...


1

I would start by breaking down the process. Each one is creating a larger shape from smaller shapes. First, create the larger shape. Create a a few varying smaller shapes (maybe 2-3). Try creating using symbols (symbol will come in handy because you can edit the symbol and it would effect all if you want to change) or as the above comment link states the ...


1

They draw them. That's how most all 'high quality' logos are done. Someone takes the time to craft them by hand. A tutorial can't really help with basic design concepts like balance, color, weight, contrast, movement, etc. That's just something that will come with practice and experience.


1

There is a program called Processing that is perfect for some of these; in particular, that umbrella. You could import the umbrella, generate a random point, test to see if the point is inside the umbrella, and if it is, use the point to draw a circle of a random radius. You could even control the density of the circles from left to right. Lullaby might have ...


2

You need to give context. For what reason are you trying to define a name for the image? Is it for internal discussion, for writing documentation? No one knows why you are asking this question. The pictures are nice, but there's no context. I think in your app you can call it anything, as long as you don't call it the file menu or the application shell. ...


2

Let's define banner first. In the context that you are asking, you mean advertising banners and in general when we say banner we consider a web banner or any other ads almost always CLICKABLE , including on desktop applications. As mentioned above there are some standards, but they are not strict. The general size you can see via link provided or here on ...


4

You can, as Ryan point out, call it a banner if you like. Seeing the context of the image, I would maybe tend toward calling it heading or header. But there are really no solid definitions here at all.


5

Generally speaking anything can be considered a "banner." The important thing is what dimensions the website you're putting it on requires it to be. One set of standards is by the IAB. In my work the IAB is still a minor player though. Maybe if you're advertising on blogs it plays more of a role on those square ads that always show up on the sidebar but ...


5

A typeface tells a story. Whether or not you're consciously aware of it, it has history, character, emotion. Of course, most people don't realize this. It's subconscious but that makes it all the more powerful as a psychological tool. If your mark is going to be primarily typographic, the message of the typeface becomes a much bigger piece of the ...


0

I like the first one, it has more of a classic feel and the "PARIS" just looks like luxury. The second ones horizontal scale seems too wide, especially in the A and S.


0

WOW, THANKS EVERYONE! I have just spent the last two days really researching and watching tutorials. I read about all the files you mentioned above. It's sounding like I should give them a nice assortment to use for whatever software they have and/or for whatever their output goals are. The PDF you mentioned, is a a VECTOR PDF something I need to specify in ...


2

I would say the first font is better for a fashion brand because it is thinner and more angular. These things give it a great feminine distinction and make it more appealing to that audience. It also has the advantage of being bolder and will stand out better when inverted to white against color and will stand off print material well when black.


2

I would say that you should always save and AI file as the primary source file and an EPS file as a universally editable format. These are ideal for printing, however for other uses you will need to produce a JPEG, PNG and possibly a TIFF. AI, primary source file, use multiple artboards for variants EPS, universal format for programs aside from Illustrator ...


6

This is wildly opinion-based, but I would go for number two; hands down. The proportions are better, the sharpness of the M an As less spiky. Besides.. the top one reminds me a little too much of Futura, and though it is a good font, it is a little dated. At least to me.


2

Under 'File', save as, .AI - Save Illustrator gives you the option to change the Version, to which you will save the .AI file as. As Bart stated, Is it possible to ask the client what format he/she prefers? Version compatibility is a concern for layout rendering, editing features and certain attributes. Client version compatibility should be your ...


7

I'd send them some combo of: EPS (the 'traditional' format. Most useful for printing) PDF (the 'replacement' for EPS) SVG (open source vector file format) PNG (raster based image--useful for web)


6

EDIT: I have just learned from @AlanGilbertson in this thread What unique benefits does the EPS format provide? ..that eps has limited uses, and in general that pdf is the way to go. If the client does not have any preferences; a good practice would be to give them an .eps and a pdf and an svg file in addition to jpg/png in different sizes. If you also ...


0

Let' look at this picture - The letters "u", "o","r","c","e" and "a" are close to the font in question (we should point out they all have unusual design), thus we may assume that the designer could use this font as a base, but changed the letters according to his taste... DESIGNER BLOCK FONT From here PS I was asked about some "prominent" feature of ...


0

I do not think it is physically printed at all for some practical reasons. There are some slight inconsistencies The placement on a paper is - to put it mildly - odd. If it is printed, I doubt this would be something that you could stick in a normal printer. In addition it does not look like campusdiversity.com exists at all. So, in conclusion, it is ...


2

This looks very much like it was made from one of the Photoshop mockup templates that have become so abundant on the web since Smart Objects (CS4) arrived on the scene. They make it easy for beginners (and quick for designers) to create sophisticated, highly realistic mockups of designs in context. Even deep debossing and fabric textures are out there in ...



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