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5

While not 'free' perhaps the 'cheapest' logo vs. size of company of recent memory is this one: The twitter logo originated as a $6 piece of stock art. And, well, it actually worked out pretty good for them. It's been tweaked and customized since then but, hey, $6. That said, that's perhaps the exception to the rule. There's nothing wrong with stock art ...


9

The long and short if it is, it's about legal issues. Logos need to often be trademarked or registered. Using free resources often means the designer does not own the rights to the free item. So, rights certainly can't be provided to any client if the designer doesn't already own them. A copyright can not be acquired for something if you don't own the rights ...


0

As DA01 Pointed, only the author knows. Probably the original root is collage in general https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Collage or a ransom note in the specific https://www.google.com.mx/search?q=ransom+note I don't know where the first collage ransom note was originated, but probably this movie poster had something to do: ...


6

First, most things in existence are copies of some idea or other. The skill to pick, search and match are worth while design skills*. In fact its often better to pick out things than to succumb to the not invented here syndrome. Second, you can draw. Logos are very geometrical and usually quite simple. Since every 3-5 year old I've interacted with last 5 ...


3

It is hard to create something completely unique and original. Every design is result of ideas and inspiration and other factors. Sometimes if you use free resources to use create design, it is more important if you manage to create "the message" and deliver what customer really needs and wants. It is a long process to create something completely unique an ...


23

If you don't like any, you'd have to pay more This is exactly what you should say. Now, prior to creating the logos, you should have a design briefing meeting with the client, so that the client can give you some direction and you're not just striking out blindly with your three designs. I like to give homework by asking "What are three (sites, ...


0

Thanks for all the responses but I played around with it a bit and finally achieved the outcome I was looking for.I just used the ellipse tool to create a circle,then I increased the thickness of the stroke to a little taller then the height of the letters.I then put the new circle behind the letters strung around in a circle and It turned out great!


0

The specific answer: read the license that came with the font. General answer: Yes, you can. Nearly all licensed typefaces allow for you to use them in any artwork you want to create--including logos. As you own a license to the type that comes with MicroSoft software--assuming you paid for the software, then yes, you can use it. There are some ...


0

Can I use a font available in Microsoft packages for my company logo? I would probably say you can't but I dont know what the licence says for the font. Check the manufacturer's website. Do I need to additionally pay for it or is it just free to use? Depends on what the licence says. You may find your answer if you visit Microsoft typography. ...


1

They are called 'negative space logos'. Here are some examples: Design Shack Bored Panda CSS Design Awards I call them negative silhouettes. The classic is the two face/a vase: Negative Space


1

This could depend on how you have your document setup but here is how I did it. Type or text out Add the blur effect, Effect - Stylize - Outer Glow Select the type and go to Object - Expand Appearance Select the type again and right click -> ungroup Select both the blur and type, Under the transparency options click on Make Mask


1

It's difficult to answer definitively without seeing how art is constructed. However, a Clipping Mask should work well. I'll assume you're starting with something like this: An object with multiple strokes and blurs applied. I am guessing here :) I used live type, but it doesn't have to be type. Basically a general set up similar to this. The black ...


1

Your reference image is a an example of a logo that uses the flat style. The shapes that make up the logo are very simple but the use of gradients gives them the perception of depth. There are different ways to achieve this effect with Illustrator. One would be to start with a base shape like a square. Then start layering additional shapes of varying ...


1

As @Scribblemacher said, you've done your due diligence. Here's one more question: if you do this work for him as he requests, might you be caught in the legal back-blast? If so, then you would be justified in either refusing or insisting on getting a signed document saying he'd protect you from any legal harassment from the infringed company (if that would ...


2

The reason why the font does not render correctly to the actual font type is because, when the SVG is saved using the Illustrator application. The application automatically converts the design to code. And if observed closely the font name within the code does not match to the actual font installed within the system. To overcome the issue of font rendering ...


1

Select the artwork Click the New Color Group icon at the bottom of the Swatches Panel -- Tick the Selected Artwork option Swatches will then be listed in the Swatch Panel as a group You may need to use the Swatch Panel Menu and choose Large List View or Small List View If you are sending a PDF, you can also use Acrobat to simply list the spot colors ...


0

You should export an SVG from Illustrator. It is scalable and will always be a good way to show an icon on the web.


1

You should send your client an .svg file, which will save the vector qualities, have a transparent background and canne uploaded to a website as an svg, therefore be live as a vector


2

There is no hard definition to any of these concepts. But, generally speaking: Your first example of government logos are often called 'seals'. Their origins come from wax stamps and are designed to be a 'signature of authenticity' that was often used by nobility and government. Many government 'logos' today--at least in many English-speaking western ...


1

If what you're talking about is the presence or absence of graphics, or a single icon (like Apple or AT&T), the word you may be looking for is logotype or possibly wordmark. The Gap, adidas, Microsoft, and IBM all have actual logos which are just made out of type — altered, colored, dressed up, but type. Having your branding made out of just type ...


4

There are no set rules or regulations as to what is and is not a logo. Some logos may use more symbolism or iconography than others and some may use more type-based designs than others. However, in the end just about anything can be called a logo if it's used as one. Since the images you posted are more certification indicators, they may be called ...


0

You can create a font with few logo of your client company. Instead of desinging a logo in a vector editor, you can do the same in a font designer. See a tattoo font. It is reasonable for the client to expect logo as a font. He can size it like a font, and it can proportionaly change. The logo as a font also keep it borders margins propertionally. Try a ...


16

First of all, it is possible to simple have a typographic logo solution. Logos do not have to be graphic marks or use an original font. If your client is happy with what you've made as a standalone logo, then you should be able to create outlines out of the logo and send him a vector form of the logo without going against the copyright. However, perhaps ...


20

You are asking a few questions here. Is simply typesetting a company name in a font a logo? Yes. It certainly can be. It's it the best solution? Sometimes. But often it's not the best solution. Can I send a copy of a commercial font I used to a client? No. If it's a commercial font, meaning you purchased a license, then if the client wants to ...


2

If you don't have any white background on your Illustrator file, then there will not be any background on your .ai or .pdf. If you want to test this and make sure there's none, open your .ai created from your Illustrator software in Photoshop. You should get only one layer with the logo on it only and no background. If you see some gray and white ...


0

I think the fastest way to do this: Method 1: If you already have a vector Add some white shapes on top of your graphic to hide the details. Then open the "pathfinder" panel, select all and "divide" everything. Then select at a piece of white, go in the menu "select" and choose "select same fill color". And delete the white parts. Method 2: In Photoshop ...


0

You'll have to manually tweak this into pixel perfection. With the 'Direct Selection Tool' (A), select each and every anchor point along the paths of the shape, and make sure it is aligned on a grid coordinate. Also, make sure you have View > 'Snap to Pixel' enabled.


0

Basing this upon comments which elude to laser etching not printing..... They are much different. For laser etching you ideally want the vector graphic. I'm uncertain if GIMP can do that, since it's a raster-based application. This is especially true if dealing with only 4cm. The original image should hold up okay. Some of the smaller detail will be ...


-1

To simplify line art, it's often a matter of just doing it by hand. Delete the extra nodes, smooth out the lines as you see fit. Lots of hand tweaking. However, here's one more automated technique I've used that sometimes works. From top-to-bottom: Original Image Image with a slight Gaussian blur applied Image after adjusting Levels to sharpen the edges ...


1

There is no reason to use it or not use it: a logo need not be so literal. However, I notice right away that the "C" can read as a "P" with the line removed. The hyphen can act as the removed line. If you make a "C" shape and a line/rule, you can mirror and rotate these two shapes to form both letters and the hyphen. This will unify the letters better than ...


0

Essentially, our brains are programmed from year's of usage to perceive depth through the use of shadows first and scale second. Your logo doesn't have any shadow in it. As a result its ambiguous if the "tri-color core" is going inwards, outwards, or harder to see but could also be a flat shape. The circle is just a circle. To ensure all viewers perceive it ...


1

I think your logo looks alright. The name with the logo fits well too. Don't take all feedback seriously, some people want to see gradients and drop shadows everywhere and maybe they expect to see the sphere with that kind of light. But your logo will be easy to use for printing and anything. The colors you chose are nice too. You can choose to ignore the ...


0

If the logo is the same color, you can use the Select By Color Tool(). Choose the Select By Color Tool then click and drag on an orange part until all of the orange is covered. Copy(Ctrl+C) and paste(Ctrl+V) the selection and make a new layer from it and put a white filled layer underneath it. After this, you can then clean up the orange a bit ...


2

I've just come up with something which is somewhat better than the original: Step 1: Resize to 200% Step 2: Colour -> Desaturate > By lightness Step 3: Colour-> Curves: Step 4: Colour -> Colourize Step 5: Resize to 50% (i.e. back to 100% of original) Result:


0

Both are completely different, I cannot see where it has been stolen.. One thing I do see that was 'stolen' or share similarity is the 'Supposed stolen logo' with Pepsi logo.. Maybe its his work process to to steal logos, so now he is projecting his insecurity onto you.


0

The ONLY similarity is that they are both illustrations. Anything beyond that is pure imagination. I think it's just a case of design envy! Keep up the good work! ~dh


0

I think of you as some cartoonist, or some other person who likes to use a pencil a lot. Web designing is the last things that comes to my mind. I liked your design btw.


4

Hold the Command/Ctrl key down and click the layer thumbnail for the "B". This will load a selection. Highlight the green layer Hold the Option/Alt key down and click the New Mask icon () at the bottom of the Layers Panel. This will provide a non-destructive way to remove one layer's contents from another. Working non-destructively has great benefits and ...


3

Select layer 1 in the Layers Panel, make sure it is highlighted. Click on the selection tool, I would suggest the Magic Wand tool if you're using Photoshop. Select/highlight the areas you wish to knock out of the layer 0. Then, with that area still highlighted, click on layer 0 in the layers panel. Press delete on your keyboard. And hide Layer 1 so ...


0

I'm sure there is more than 1 solution for this, but here is how I solve this : I kind of zoom in for a better selection, I use " Magic Wand Tool " to select on my text while on my text layer. Then, select my background layer and hit delete button. Here is my result Note : I change the background-color to black for you guys easier to see.


0

I think I know what might be the issue. Select the object that you're trying to scale and then go to Object > Flatten Transparency... and you should be able to solve it. Lemme know if this works!



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