Tag Info

New answers tagged

0

Yes! You can do this from command line (using the Terminal app) with ImageMagick. After you install ImageMagick, navigate to the directory where your picture is located and run the following command: identify -verbose yourimage.jpg | grep -i quality And you should get the value which indicates the image quality. 0 means the lowest quality and 100 means ...


0

Gif just supports 1-bit transparency. That means that a pixel is either transparent, or a color. So all the antialiasing is being exported as a mix between the text color and the background color (or white). Use a 24-bit png, that will allow you to have transparency levels.


-1

As other's have stated, fonts are bitmaps to begin with. They are vectors. So there is no truly native size. However, most digital fonts can come with something that is called 'manual hinting'. This means someone went in and made on-screen bitmap copies of each glyph by hand. So there may be one or more font sizes with this font than will have 'native ...


-1

I don't think there's really any such thing as a native size in points for a bitmapped font. After all they are comprised of pixels. And even a modern vector font's stated size in points is rather an arbitrary measure. However, old bitmap Mac system fonts for example assumed 1 point:1 pixel equivalence on screen (72 ppi). So Geneva might have had 9pt, 12pt ...


-1

Modern fonts are usually made up of vector information.More specifically points in space that are connected by lines. They don't have a size. The difference between bitmapped fonts and outline fonts is that the first are composed of several images for each font size. So you have no base font size. A text on a image is not a font, since it cannot be ...


0

You might want to open the font in a font editor (such as FontLab), then copy the glyph and paste it in Illustrator. Illustrator will give you the glyph's size in any unit you want. Or ask someone to do it for you (I can do it for you).



Top 50 recent answers are included