Tag Info

Hot answers tagged

17

Quote a price, then itemize on any estimate/invoice. If a client sends a broad statement like you've posted.... First ask questions even if you know the answers to them: Will you be providing the copy to use or is that something you want me to come up with? Do you have high resolution images you'd like to provide? Then respond with an itemized list of ...


9

I think most clients will assume price is negotiable and try to lower it ;) Something you can do is offer more than one option per project. This doesn't work in every case, but I've done it a few times and results were good. You make two or three proposals based on features, starting with the most basic one and going up to a super-complete-pack. You list ...


9

Just raising my rates seems very difficult It's pretty easy. Send out an email to your clients: As of day X my normal hourly rates for work will be increasing from Y to Z. You may lose a few clients, but eventually, you'll gain new ones that appreciate the work they're getting for the price. One reason clients start asking you for all the extras is ...


8

"e-flier" is a bit of a nonsense term. It means nothing since electronic delivery can be done in so many various ways. If the client wants a file he can email to perspective people when requested, then a PDF is appropriate. You can embed video, audio, and other interactive elements in a PDF. How you generate the PDF really depends upon what software you ...


8

De gustibus non est disputandum applies. What is tasteless, like what is humorous (or not), varies with culture, fashion, sensitivities and the prevailing political climate. It is also a personal matter, so my answer is personal. Like anyone, I have my own views on what is acceptable. This isn't a matter of being snobbish; it's that I want to hang onto my ...


7

I second Emilie in saying that everything will offend someone somewhere. Personally, I am pretty sick of people finding offence left right and centre. Some people are looking for things that will get their knickers in a twist, and as Alan so elegantly points out: pleasing everyone ends up in the bland, the invisible and - at best - mediocre work. And ...


7

That said is it bad to assume in re-branding that people would go to the site to fill out a contact form? Yes. I have found it a mistake to assume the preferred method of communication from any client. I have clients that I've never personally spoken to and everything is handled via email. I have clients who will send an email then call to see if I ...


7

Obviously the sharper the transition the better - but sometimes compromises are needed. I was working at an organisation that had this exact issue. They were large, very budget-conscious organisation with lots of very varied branded products with very varied stock turnaround, and a new brand that was maybe 40% similar to the old brand. They did it in a ...


7

Clients expect my input and often leave me with little to nothing to work with so I'm doing basically their sales pitch in addition to their deliverables. This is your problem. Define in your scope of work what exactly you will provide and what exactly the client will provide. If the client is supposed to provide copy, spell out "Client will email a ...


6

I think that in an ideal world you would dispose/recycle the old materials and rollout new ones at once but this isn't an ideal world. I would also say that there's actually three types of companies in this class: Mega corporations Large companies Small businesses I would imagine only the large companies would be able to afford to dispose of their ...


6

You never communicate that price is negotiable. Sorry. Its bad sales and marketing strategy. Rule #1 Never speak first. If they like your work then they'll either pay the rate or start negotiations and see how flexible you are. You can and should outline what the rate is for. In a bid you would say that this rate is for this exact work. That gives you ...


6

An excellent rule of thumb is to always have a logo and contact information on anything that can be shared individually. Realize people won't take a screenshot of your Facebook page and pass that around, but people might copy the image and pass that around. The only reasons the first image is better are because A) the text is actually readable and B) the ...


5

I don't know if I'd call it a disconnect. This is a product of the desktop publishing era. Many small businesses (at least in the US) employ an in-house "marketing" person who does it all. They often learn graphics apps on the job or through some kind of on-line training. I've seen this first hand, coming in as a freelancer. One person who learns web and ...


5

Price is ALWAYS negotiable. But there's no advantage or reason that you need to remind anyone of that.


5

It really depends on many factors, such as the industry the company is in, the reason behind the brand refresh and various others. Putting myself in the rather comfortable shoes of a CEO, I would immediately discount Option A for any company with a marketing budget less than at least $20 million, and even then writing it off would cost 5% of the budget. ...


5

You need the contact info from the second image. But, keep it short and simple. The text needs to be readable, like the first image. A modern style really helps. The text should be readable even when it is a small image (i.e. a sidebar advert) The photo really can't be stretched. If you have a website, include it. I think it's written over the car logo, ...


5

It's not difficult to raise your rates if you can validate them. In your design brief or quote you should bill a few additional hours if you know you're spending time to develop content. I would look at your year-to-date projects and see if you can ball park the time spent wether it be in design, development, customer one-on-one. You should never cheat ...


4

Use. For example direct mail has Postal restrictions. You can't just arbitrarily create a size you want. Well, you can, but mail costs increase dramatically for custom sizes. Sticking to standard postal sizes greatly reduces mailing costs. Audience. A six-color, spot varnish, gold-foil piece is not going to be received well if your target audience is ...


4

I wouldn't say those job descriptions are asking the candidate to actually be able to execute graphic design, but rather manage it--be it through vendors or other teams within the organization. Marketing and Graphic Design obviously are closely related and there is certainly overlap. It certainly doesn't hurt marketing folks to have some graphic design ...


4

This is really Your Mileage May Vary, or in this case Your Audience's Mileage May Vary. What one audience thinks is tasteless is another audience's boring. The multi-racial family in the Cheerios ad, for example: in some corners of the U.S. it's shocking to the point of boycotting the cereal, in some areas the reaction is "Finally!", in some it's "huh? ...


4

Great answers here, I just wanted to mention something that hasn't been raised yet (except in the question), and it's the matter of dignity. Humor, even if slightly offensive for a group or the other, is one thing. I love humor. Playing on people's weaknesses for the sake of profit is entirely different. I don't mind the 'colorful' Benetton ads, but I do ...


4

This will vary from product to product. I would encourage you to seek out the terms and conditions on a case by case basis. This might involve e-mailing the company, but sometimes the information is already made publicly available. For example, here's Apple's marketing guidelines for iPads, iPhones, and iPods: 2.2 Image use The Apple product images ...


3

It's always about the brand. What does the brand stand for in it's audience's mind? Is it offensive, irreverent, tasteless? Then you have to live up to that. Anything less wouldn't be true to their intended message. If you aren't comfortable with that type of material, you shouldn't be working with a brand that stands for it in the first place. Another ...


3

I merely provide pricing and then add "If you have any questions or concerns, I'm always happy to to discuss them." If they take that to mean pricing, they can. It doesn't mean I'll alter pricing, but I want clients to feel free to bring up any topic related to the work.


3

When I was coming up with a logo for my club, I was thinking about the things mentioned in most books on graphic design like its sense of identity, and use. One thing I learned after coming up with a lot of concepts that ultimately went to my trashcan was that your logo needs to be a simple one, that can easily show people 'what you're about'. There are ...


3

To answer all the individual questions you posed: It depends. In other words, there's no hard and fast rules to this. But, in general, I'd suggest not trying to make the logo do too much. One of the more common mistakes for beginners is trying to make the logo literally describe the company. As your examples show, rarely is that actually what a great logo ...


3

Logo and SOME contact information should be on all things. Now you don't need all of your contact info on everything. Brick and Mortar Store / Restaurant: Location is needed Online Reseller: Website is needed Service Provider like you: Phone number is needed Now this is just fundamental and gets very open quickly. For example, does someone reserve their ...


2

word of mouth (Typically the most common method) your local Chamber of Commerce (or other business org) if you want to stay local your local startup incubator/organization (they should have plenty of suggestions) your local AIGA (in the USA. Other countries likely have their own graphic design industry groups) Web sites such as dribbble.com or behance.com ...


2

If the company decided to create a new brand design they should define a day x. After this day all material (paper, web, business card, ...) has to change to the new design. I would think to write something like "Our design has changed. This is our new look" or something else to announce the change to the customers. Mixing old and new design does not ...


2

1 Is it bad to assume in branding that people would go to the site to fill out a contact form? Well in general assumptions are always bad. We have to do them though. In general I'll tell you that I almost never fill out online forms and I'm hardly old. To me online form gets submitted to who knows where for spam and junk. If you don't give me a human ...



Only top voted, non community-wiki answers of a minimum length are eligible