Tag Info

Hot answers tagged

7

A monitor can't show true CMYK. CMYK is reflective light, or subtractive color. A computer display is projected light, or additive color. They take up different (albeit overlapping) color spaces. Your software does its best to emulate the CMYK colors converting them to RGB but it simply can't replicate them exactly. "When ever I'm choosing color while ...


6

There's actual studies on this: http://www.nytimes.com/2012/02/08/technology/for-multitaskers-multiple-monitors-improve-office-efficiency.html?pagewanted=all There's lots of reasons why having more screens can be a benefit to people. Brendan included several. One not mentioned is that the monitors that you can change the orientation to vertical (portrait) ...


5

I use three 17s at work and a single 22 at home (laptop is usually closed under the desk). I'm not sure what you're running, but I find that in most cases a bigger monitor with Spaces on the Mac is just as good as a multiple monitor setup. Your eye can really only look at one monitor anyways, and having Ctrl + left and right as options is only a touch slower ...


4

It's not so much "how does the monitor display color" as "how does the software think it's displaying this particular color on this particular monitor." As they say on Facebook, "It's complicated." Color gets to your screen through layers of software called color profiles. A color profile takes the raw numbers and interprets them for display or for ...


4

I could not manage without a second monitor. I do a lot of production work, and I am constantly flipping between the Adobe and Microsquish suites, with email in the corner. One screen slows me down painfully. But it's a matter of workflow. If your screen is large enough to fit everything comfortably, or you don't mind tabbing, you're fine.


4

I honestly wouldn't worry about colour accuracy for web. Every person in the planet will see the site in a different shade (so to say). One thing is using web safe colours, that will actually make a difference if you have, for example, overlapping layers (like a non-transparent image on the same colour background). But a website will be seen in anything from ...


3

I use 3 monitors (2-30" and 1-27"). I've become so accustomed to this configuration that trying to work on anything less can actually be a hinderance. Although, it's not crippling by any means. I simply work slower with two monitors and even slower still with a single screen. I'm a Mac user, and I do not use the application frame Adobe implemented in recent ...


3

I would love to have 2 monitors at work. I don't do any coding but I do lots of stock images, have to look back and forth at either an e-mail or a company's website when doing an advertisement, look in our database of contact information. A lot of times I end up printing stuff out just so I can see it all while doing the design. Then when we lay books out ...


3

Get a used Spyder, see Amazon to get one for $40. Or if your budget is a bit higher, get one for $75 that'll be a bit better. Most of these solutions will work for a Mac, Linux is a bit trickier...


3

I think what you're referring to is the pixel density and not the resolution (even though they're related). The pixel density can be measured by counting the number of pixels in one inch. Whereas a screen resolution is the number of pixels that a screen can fit in each dimention (horizontal and vertical). On devices with high pixel density, the browser ...


3

From a practical standpoint, I can't think of a reason to be concerned about calibration for web work beyond setting the gamma somewhat accurately to 2.2 and your display to 6500K (sometimes labeled D65). These will allow you to display as much of the sRGB gamut, which is the web standard, as your monitor is capable of. You can do all this without shelling ...


2

The key point is that you should be looking for an IPS (in-plane switching) panel, not a TN (twisted nematic) panel. IPS panels cost significantly more, but give better colour reproduction with a wider viewing angle. Most TN panels display dithered 6 bit/channel rather than true 8 bit/channel colour, and suffer from noticeable colour shifts as you move ...


2

OK, I admit that it's a late, late, late reply, but there's nothing really tricky about calibrating/profiling devices on Linux. All you need is a recent version of Ubuntu or Fedora. It usually already has GNOME Color Manager. So you just plug your colorimeter in, press a button, and it does everything for you.


2

Most monitors let you decrease the contrast through an OSD menu or buttons built into the display itself. Additionally, different video cards come with drivers that also allow you to change the picture quality of the display (contrast included). Also, Windows and most other OSes allow you to adjust the contrast of your display through system settings, e.g. ...


1

Some of this is subjective, but if you want to make sure you don't cross the line into having text which risks being unreadable, you can use the W3C's AA or AAA accessibility guidelines. The easy way to do this is by plugging the colours you use into a tool like snook.ca's colour contrast checker. According to that, the colours used on the 'grey on grey' ...


1

In my opinion you may want to consider getting one of those rare monitors that can tilt 90 degrees to do portrait as well as landscape mode. Although this affects the viewing angle (it gets narrower) there is a lot to be said for being able to see your whole page on a screen without having to look through a letterbox. I have a Samsung 2048 x 1152 ...


1

Sony and Apple tend to make high end LCDs in terms of color fidelity.


1

I'm using two Dell U2410 in a dual-screen setup for layout and design work. It's a IPS panel, so the view angle is realy good. It's a wide-gamut display with different present modes, so you could also switch to SRGB mode for webdesign. I'm really happy with these displays and the price was much cheaper than a similar Eizo screen.


1

Try adjusting the dot—gap ratio to 1:1.5+ so that the dots and gaps are not the same size. I believe it's has to do with screen drawing/movement and moire/strobe effect. Try the gap thing. You may need to make it 1:1.75 or even 2 to make it not flicker. Also, if you have not, define a pattern and fill, that will make testing faster. Thinking about it, if ...


1

There's no common widget out there but there are a LOT of variants of the old lightbox effect you are referring to. If you want to stick to the Adobe suite, there are widgets for Dreamweaver but I've never touched them. There's a forum post here -> http://forums.adobe.com/thread/37212 If you were interested in comparing all of the different libraries ...



Only top voted, non community-wiki answers of a minimum length are eligible