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12

They are file formats for storing font information. TrueType was invented by Apple as a competition to Adobe's PostScript Type1. Both TrueType and PostScript fonts became the standard file formats for fonts for the past 3 decades or so of desktop publishing. In terms of your average designer, the differences between the two are relatively unimportant. ...


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Adobe offers some great reading on type formats: See Adobe explanations here Excerpts from the link: WHAT IS TRUETYPE? TrueType is a standard for digital type fonts that was developed by Apple Computer, and subsequently licensed to Microsoft Corporation. Each company has made independent extensions to TrueType, which is used in both Windows and ...


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Short answer: It's specific to the implementation. Long answer: Research the market for your typeface. Look through how Google Webfonts does charsets and the Mac keyboard implementation of accented characters. Google provides some clarification on making charset calls, which is what occurs with websites and webapps. If your target market is something ...


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In the Character Panel flyout Menu, with the type layer highlighted, Under "Opentype" uncheck "Discretionary Ligatures". Screenshot is from CS5 but it should be in the same location.


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OpenType technology doesn't allow randomness so ‘randomness’ must be simulated. OpenType ‘randomness’ can be simulated using groups of letters know as alternates. The idea that you could have 3 groups or more of the same letters that rotate; you’d expect to never see the same letter more than once in a word. Unfortunately due to letter combinations, ...


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Some OpenType fonts have several designs for a particular character and randomly show one so the text looks more naturally handwritten. For example http://fontfeed.com/archives/upcoming-fontfont-mister-k-pro/


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While there are no standards, there are submissions to and recommendations from the World Wide Web Consortium. Fonts at World Wide Web Consortium has further, more technical information. The WOFF FAQ claims that WOFF, as it gains acceptance, allows better typography, accessibility, internationalization and Search Engine Optimization. On a related note that ...


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Given you only want to use caps in your comic, a simple solution to add a little variation could be: create two different uppercase forms for each letter assign one to the letter's uppercase slot, and the other to the letter's lowercase slot create your lettering using a mix of uppercase and lowercase characters You could probably randomise thE mIx to ...


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OpenType is a font format jointly developed by Microsoft and Adobe as an extension to Apple's TrueType font format. And please check these links: OpenType Font language support table from the PDF leaflet for your handy reference What is open type OpenType Tips, Techniques, and Resources Beginners Guide to OpenType OpenType Font Features Hope ...


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The tutorial materials for FontForge include a good introduction to opentype and a fairly comprehensive reference table of OTF features.


2

Ink traps are a device to compensate for over-absorbent papers and metal type in letterpress printing. They are mostly irrelevant for offset presses. James Felici has an excellent summary in "The Complete Manual of Typography" (highly recommended for anyone working with type). They are mostly irrelevant today, unless you are working on a letterpress project. ...


2

Not only would you need to use a font which has multiple glyphs for the same character but your application would need to support this feature too. InDesign and Illustrator both have a Glyphs palette that allow you to manually select an alternate glyph for any character in your text. However this would be quite a labour intensive process if you were setting ...


2

I believe what you're describing is the contextual alternates feature of opentype. ( http://msdn.microsoft.com/en-us/library/ms745109.aspx ) Nick Shinn has a really interesting article on many of the features available using contextual alternates, and how he used it in five fonts he designed. Duffy Script in particular was used in the way you're ...


2

I haven't played with the randomize function but I have gotten some good results with extensive use of ligatures. Most the variation in handwriting is related to context: this follows that, that follows this, this is the end of the word, etc. OpenType ligatures can accomodate for a lot of variation if you're willing to plan it out well. There is also the ...


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From Microsoft's OpenType spec (emphasis mine): An alternate substitution identifies functionally equivalent but different looking forms of a glyph. These glyphs are often referred to as aesthetic alternatives. For example, a font might have five different glyphs for the ampersand symbol, but one would have a default glyph index in the cmap table. The ...


2

Opentype fonts allow for many contextual alternate forms of each glyph, and rules to determine when they are automatically substituted for the default glyph form. As far as I am aware any application which supports OT fonts will support these features. While you'd normally have only a few letters with a contextual alternate, it's theoretically possible to ...


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As far as I know there is no standard for free fonts. You can release it in ttf format. Other formats (such as eot, woff) are webfont formats.


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I don't know about "standard", but I only purchase/download OpenType fonts (OTF) today. I've found far too many poorly constructed TTF fonts to consider using them anymore. TTF is a fine format and there is no inherent issue with using that format. The problems I've encountered seem to be that many creators releasing TTF files are not as meticulous in the ...


2

A Google search indicates that others have asked as well but I'm not seeing much planned. A project did exist, and received funding to improve the text --- it was implemented already. http://www.linuxfund.org/projects/inkscape/ Here is a Feature Request, but it has gotten very little support. I'd venture to say its because Inkscape is an illustration suite, ...


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The Unicode Common Locale Data Repository and more precise the Unicode Locale Data Summary provides a summary view of the main locale data.


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Randomness is possible.* You just have to be really smart and really dedicated to make it happen. Serious programming chops required. Most of the very natural looking handwriting fonts you'll find use contextual alternates and complicated ligature substitution. This actually achieves a more natural result than randomization. Some great examples of ...


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OpenType is the standard; it completely supersedes Postscript Type 1 and (early) TrueType formats. OTF fonts have built-in support for advanced typographical features like ligatures, stylistic alternates, etc. OTF fonts have the broadest cross-platform support (I believe) – the main computing platforms support OTF natively, both desktop and mobile as do all ...


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FontLab will do the trick. Hefty price tag for a one off job. Have you considered contacting the foundry you purchased from.


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You are aiming on contextual and stylistic alternate character forms, which is supported by opentype: http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/OpenType


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“Concerned” – not so much… “Aware” – definately. The fact is really good fonts should have shapes matched to their physical size. Simple scaling can't always do the trick, or rather: rarely can. Take, for example, Computer Modern. This font has variants intended for use at, among others, 6 and 11 points (AFAICR). Glyph shapes (especially proportion wise) are ...



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