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5

To add to DA01's excellent answer and to provide additional context, OpenType comes in two flavors: TrueType and PostScript. So way back in the day, when Adobe created PostScript, they defined curves in a certain way mathematically. PostScript became wildly popular because it could accurately take things on screen and print them onto paper and it could ...


4

What specific advantages or disadvantages can be found in the various font formats in today's technological setting?? As you stated, today's main advantage is with OpenType being able to support a much larger set of glyphs as well as other things like alternate characters and automatic character swapping. Should I be avoiding Type 1 and Type 3 ...


4

The way you authenticate a piece of software (a font is a piece of software) is you have a receipt of purchase and a license agreement on paper stored on file. Without these 2 options its nearly impossible to verify ownership. In case of digital stuff you still need to have a paper copy of the money transaction and the license key. Then the vendor can ...


4

I haven’t tested this, but I this should be possible with contextual chaining substitutions. You roughly need to do the following (the details probably depend on the program you are using), taking the alternation between vertical and horizontal as an example: Make your default letters vertical. Create a single-substitution feature that replaces each ...


2

No, you don't need and I don't think you can install both anyway, they usually get in conflict. You need to choose one. Which one you choose depends on what you need and prefer. OpenTypes are like an "improved" version of TrueTypes. If you're using an old Windows system, the OpenType might not work unless you tweak the registry. If you do web design and ...



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