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4

The Open Type format is, put simply, a standard "wrapper" for font information. The font information itself, i.e. the font outlines, can be either Truetype or CFF/Postscript, which use different kids of curves (different mathematical ways to define the curves). Truetype flavored means the outlines are in truetype format. More information on the OpenType ...


3

OpenType Collections are just bundles of multiple font files. Each font within that collection is obviously limited by the maximum glyph limit, but as far as I'm aware there is no limit on the number of fonts contained within a collection. I can't find a defined limit either in any specification or in generators (i.e font editors). Microsoft's OpenType ...


3

While it would be possible to have several styles inside one OpenType font as Stylistic Sets, it is absolutely unrecommended and you would need to do this manually with professional font design software like FontLab, Glyphs or Robofont. What you probably mean is combining special font files like small caps, tabular numerals, alternates or extended ...


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No, you don't need and I don't think you can install both anyway, they usually get in conflict. You need to choose one. Which one you choose depends on what you need and prefer. OpenTypes are like an "improved" version of TrueTypes. If you're using an old Windows system, the OpenType might not work unless you tweak the registry. If you do web design and ...


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Std means "standard" and can have different meanings depending on the foundry. The difference between Rockwell and Rockwell Std appears to be a difference in symbols included as well as minor differences in letter spacing and line height. WGL fonts only support Windows Glyph List characters. For information about other font name abbreviations, I find ...


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Glyphs uses it's own elaborate glyph naming scheme, which is design to be more "human-readable" and is used to auto generate some OpenType features. For example: You can create stylistic sets by using the suffix .ss01 for the first set, .ss02 for the second set etc. You can create figure sets with the following suffixes: .tf for tabular lining, .tosf for ...


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OpenType fonts are indeed capable of much (much!) more than the old Adobe Type 1 format. Character encoding can be stored not only in byte format (which is the reason for the 256 glyph limit in Type 1 fonts) but as Unicode as well. This is not limited to 2-byte Unicode either. Fonts can, for example, contain emoji with Unicode code points well over U+1FF00 (...


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Most font managers should tell you this. I'm not sure what you use, but I can show you in FontExplorer X Pro. Open the font 'information' window (cmd+i on OS X), then under 'Detailed Preview', all available OpenType features are shown in the right column, as you can see in the screenshot:


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Luc Devroye has the best list I've ever seen of "random" fonts. I remember reading his paper Random fonts for the simulation of handwriting several years ago and being fascinated. In fact, I was searching for that paper when I found this question. Some of the links are defunct, but you can find for example MyFont on the Wayback Machine. I have never ...



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