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12

You could use Vector Magic, which is a pretty awesome service that converts images to clean vector art. I tested it with your image and the result is much better than the original JPG version and half of it's size.


8

Ten years ago, this would have been a great question. But in 2011, unless you are sure that a high percentage of site visitors will be on dial-up or similar low-bandwidth connections, the effort put into selective compression doesn't produce enough value to be worth it. The differences in quality and file size are so minimal, and broadband connections so ...


6

If the target file type is PNG, then you have a few options. First, open the PNG in Fireworks then save optimized. FW compreses .png files better than PS. Then use PNGOUT(freeware) to compress further. Typical result is about 30% less than what Photoshop would produce.


4

When applying anti-aliasing in the Save for Web & Devices panel the entire export gets the same anti-aliasing method but you can apply the anti-alisaing on an object level. Select an object and go to Effect > Rasterize.... Choose your desired ppi, it is better to always choose Use Document Raster Effects Resolution because then it will be easy to ...


4

In GIMP, my tool of choice for this purpose is Filters → Blur → Selective Gaussian Blur: With some tweaking of the parameters, it can give results very similar to what Lipis produced with Vector Magic. The basic rules are: If any edges look blurred, decrease the max. delta. (Look for edges with low constrast, such as the blue text on blue in ...


4

JPEGmini is pretty good at recompressing JPEGs to the lowest still-good quality. They claim to have a better model to predict which lossy changes are imperceptible to the human eye. This combined with ImageOptim (with jpegrescan in the latest version) gives the most efficient JPEG compression I'm aware of.


4

In your case I would have maybe used GREP styles shown on the image below. Here ~h stands for End Nested Style Here character which serves as a style divider (visible in special characters mode as a backslash). If you feel more comfortable with any other character feel free to replace all the ~h-s with anything you like from the drop-down menu. The ...


4

Graphic size optimization is both an art and a science. Different kinds of images respond differently to different compression schemes and output formats. For photorealistic images jpeg is usually the best output format. Jpegs can have various amounts of compression applied, and some images can withstand much jpeg compression without obvious degradation ...


3

Fewer colors + 100% dither + no Transparency Dither = greater size. Adding a transparency dither or reducing the color dithering to less than 100% will most likely reduce the file size. When you reduce the color table and have a high dither setting, you ask Photoshop to dither with fewer colors. This actually creates more color data to maintain from frame ...


3

In your question, you write: "Tools like PNGOUT blithely strip out color profiles (the iCCP chunk), which arguably makes the tools lossy because it changes the appearance of non-sRGB images in nearly all modern browsers." While pre-converting the images to sRGB is indeed one solution to this problem, another is to tell PNGOUT to keep the color profile ...


3

I finally solved it. I'd used the ICC profiles available on the ICC's website, which was strangely enough a mistake, since they introduce the errors I mentioned in the question. GraphicsMagick (slightly lossy) GraphicsMagick does this in a very slightly lossy method (brighter colors are reduced by one, like from #cccccc to #cbcbcb). However, this doesn't ...


3

All pngs are 'good' and 'sharp' as they are losslessly compressed, unlike jpgs. It's just a matter of experimenting with settings that keep an amount of colour that you're happy with while keeping file sizes as low as possible. In Photoshop, the 'Save for web' exporter allows you to view 3 different optimised versions of the output as well as the original. ...


2

You can: reduce the image size (fewer pixels = smaller file) reduce the frames in the animation reduce the color pallet further posterize the images (larger flatter areas of color compress better for GIFs) Use software that can add additional compression techniques (IIRC, Fireworks is good for this)


2

Lately I've been using ImageOptim and ImageAlpha with very good results. ImageOptim is very good at optimizing and compressing GIF/JPEG/PNG and I'm using ImageAlpha to convert most of my images to PNG with good results: most of the times I get PNG files (full color) that are smaller than GIFs (50-60%), with very little quality loss. It even has an option ...


2

Photoshop's "Save For Web" isn't the best tool indeed. It compresses PNGs poorly and doesn't fully support alpha channel in 8-bit PNGs. Instead use ImageAlpha+ImageOptim on Mac or TinyPNG+PNGGauntlet on Windows. Here's a real-world test showing that PNGs with alpha channel can be reduced to less than quarter of Photoshop's size.


2

A tiny version of an icon must be created for the specific size. Even in the print world, we often do two versions of a company logo (which is, when you think about it, an icon with another name): one for "normal" use and one for small applications such as a business card, but it's even worse when your work is constrained to a grid of great big blocky ...


1

If I understand your question, you've got an animation with (lets say) 5 frames. Frames 1 & 5, 2 & 4 are identical. So you'd like Photoshop to play the gif like so: 1,2,3,2,1. Unfortunately that's impossible with an animated gif. Gifs are built to allow the data to stream, displaying the next frame in sequence as the data is loaded. The first frame ...


1

Regarding #1, I posted an answer on a similar post where I used a script to exclude "draft" pages. Perhaps you could use that, or flip the script to only include pages that you mark? As for #2, that can be accomplished with a script. Give this a try: var currentPage = app.activeWindow.activePage; // Find the active page. ItemsOnPage = ...


1

I did some playing with the image... extracted a copy from your PNG24 example and tried several methods. In the end I'd use this, myself: (not great on white.. better on a grey) What I did was use PNG8 with no color diffusion, then set the transparency diffusion to 50% dithered, and added a grey matte color (#dddddd). That slight grey matte helps the ...


1

I know you didnt say this but why wouldn't you just code everything in CSS if you are worried about load times and file sizes? Circles tutorial, David's demo and another good tutorial by Brian Hadaway Angled text tutorial EDIT: Other circular questions on the stack here and here


1

I don’t know the limitations of the iphone, but i think it is pretty similar to the web. The compression of PNG is good for sharp text, but it has no options on how much you want to compress your image. PNG 24 will be the way to go, if you have alpha-transparencies and a color palette which affords over 256 colors. PNG 8 can be compared with GIF. You ...


1

ImageAnalyzer has lossy PNG compressor that blurs the image as you lower the quality, so in this case it compresses the image pretty well. However, you'll have better result if you de-noise the image or save noisy version as JPEG.


1

What I've done after reading this was create any text into outlines. Box select "logo Text" Right click and say "Create Outlines" or Edit > Object > create outlines. This will allow any Export optimized for Art. However I was using this for a logo that will be printed, and not just web use. However I imagine it will be much of the same.


1

The only color space to use for image prep for mobile devices is RGB. (You can use others temporarily for retouching purposes, but your final output will always be RGB, so best work in that space all the time.) sRGB is the safest, since you don't know the capabilities of specific devices at design-time. Save for Web is your best option inside Photoshop. ...


1

I usually use photoshop's save for web and devices, but it has no options for compressing pngs and I also wonder if there are superior compression algorithms available? Firstly, should you be using PNG or JPEG? If you are saving an image for the web, these days the choice is between PNG and JPEG. PNG is very good for images that will losslessly ...


1

My approach is not very technical so i cannot give any specific algorithms but Adobe Fireworks is one of the best tools to optimize any image format for web. You can use it. Also ImageOptim works good on OSX. Same results with fireworks, i compared them.



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