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70

As Wrzlprmft has already pointed out, over 50% of your SVG file's size is taken up by an embedded PNG bitmap image used to create a fairly subtle shading effect on the controller. Just getting rid of that image, and replacing it with a simple radial gradient, is enough to shrink the SVG down to about 10kb.               ...


34

Your SVG contains an embedded pixel graphic for the shade in the bottom right of the controller. This is responsible for about ⅔ of the file size. If you remove it, your SVG file is en par with your JPEG. You can probably achieve an adequately similar effect with a gradient. Other techniques of reducing SVG file size include: Remove all Metadata and ...


26

I am a little surprised no-one has mentioned the "Scour" extension. It's bundled with Inkscape (as of v0.47), and does many of the optimisations mentioned by Ilmari Karonen.


16

This probably doesn't answer your question. Some possible alternatives... Have you considered CSS instead: background: linear-gradient(45deg, #3d667c, #1d283e); Or perhaps you could use the SVG base64 technique (generator tool here): <svg xmlns="http://www.w3.org/2000/svg" width="100%" height="100%" viewBox="0 0 1 1" ...


12

You could use Vector Magic, which is a pretty awesome service that converts images to clean vector art. I tested it with your image and the result is much better than the original JPG version and half of it's size.


12

JPEG is not a lossless compression JPEG Compression is considered a lossy compression even when set at 100% quality you loss some quality. That's why for simple graphics such as UI interfaces and backgrounds is generally better to use a lossless format such as PNG. 200kb isn't that big in 2014/2015 While it would be idea to decrease the size of the ...


7

If the target file type is PNG, then you have a few options. First, open the PNG in Fireworks then save optimized. FW compreses .png files better than PS. Then use PNGOUT(freeware) to compress further. Typical result is about 30% less than what Photoshop would produce.


7

Ten years ago, this would have been a great question. But in 2011, unless you are sure that a high percentage of site visitors will be on dial-up or similar low-bandwidth connections, the effort put into selective compression doesn't produce enough value to be worth it. The differences in quality and file size are so minimal, and broadband connections so ...


6

MozJPEG is a modernized JPEG encoder, probably the best one you can find. JPEGmini is pretty good at recompressing JPEGs to the lowest still-good quality. They claim to have a better model to predict which lossy changes are imperceptible to the human eye. Adept tries to automatically adjust quality, lowering quality of "uninteresting" areas of the image. ...


6

When applying anti-aliasing in the Save for Web & Devices panel the entire export gets the same anti-aliasing method but you can apply the anti-alisaing on an object level. Select an object and go to Effect > Rasterize.... Choose your desired ppi, it is better to always choose Use Document Raster Effects Resolution because then it will be easy to ...


5

Fewer colors + 100% dither + no Transparency Dither = greater size. Adding a transparency dither or reducing the color dithering to less than 100% will most likely reduce the file size. When you reduce the color table and have a high dither setting, you ask Photoshop to dither with fewer colors. This actually creates more color data to maintain from frame ...


5

Adobe's Photoshop supports something like 300,000 pixel canvas's. It has a "Save for Web" feature that allows you to save a PNG24 file (which supports your alpha transparency). It too has all the functions you are looking for.


5

Before delivering your final website design, you really should optimise the images with tools that are more focused towards and dedicated to optimising images. Photoshop does okay, but I've seen many people comment that other tools do a better job. From what I hear, ImageMagick is pretty good for this purpose. However, as a command-line-noob I need to spend ...


4

Graphic size optimization is both an art and a science. Different kinds of images respond differently to different compression schemes and output formats. For photorealistic images jpeg is usually the best output format. Jpegs can have various amounts of compression applied, and some images can withstand much jpeg compression without obvious degradation ...


4

In your case I would have maybe used GREP styles shown on the image below. Here ~h stands for End Nested Style Here character which serves as a style divider (visible in special characters mode as a backslash). If you feel more comfortable with any other character feel free to replace all the ~h-s with anything you like from the drop-down menu. The ...


4

In GIMP, my tool of choice for this purpose is Filters → Blur → Selective Gaussian Blur: With some tweaking of the parameters, it can give results very similar to what Lipis produced with Vector Magic. The basic rules are: If any edges look blurred, decrease the max. delta. (Look for edges with low constrast, such as the blue text on blue in ...


4

You can convert it to a compressed SVG (SVGZ) and put the image.svgz on your web page: gzip image.svg mv image.svg.gz image.svgz Or, in Adobe Illustrator, simply save as "SVG compressed", which will write an image.svgz file. For your test image it's still larger than the JPG, though: image.jpg: 7268 bytes image.svg: 22385 bytes image.svgz: 14614 ...


4

Probably the initial step is more planning than Photoshop's. 1) Do I need an image file? Or can I use something else Background-color. A css gradient. 2) Do I need that file dimensions? or can I use A lower dimension upscaled. Mask the low resolution with something? a pattern over it, a blur, darken it. A pattern. Is the image really worth it to have ...


3

All pngs are 'good' and 'sharp' as they are losslessly compressed, unlike jpgs. It's just a matter of experimenting with settings that keep an amount of colour that you're happy with while keeping file sizes as low as possible. In Photoshop, the 'Save for web' exporter allows you to view 3 different optimised versions of the output as well as the original. ...


3

In your question, you write: "Tools like PNGOUT blithely strip out color profiles (the iCCP chunk), which arguably makes the tools lossy because it changes the appearance of non-sRGB images in nearly all modern browsers." While pre-converting the images to sRGB is indeed one solution to this problem, another is to tell PNGOUT to keep the color profile ...


3

I finally solved it. I'd used the ICC profiles available on the ICC's website, which was strangely enough a mistake, since they introduce the errors I mentioned in the question. GraphicsMagick (slightly lossy) GraphicsMagick does this in a very slightly lossy method (brighter colors are reduced by one, like from #cccccc to #cbcbcb). However, this doesn't ...


3

A tiny version of an icon must be created for the specific size. Even in the print world, we often do two versions of a company logo (which is, when you think about it, an icon with another name): one for "normal" use and one for small applications such as a business card, but it's even worse when your work is constrained to a grid of great big blocky ...


3

Honestly... I copy/paste to Photoshop as a Smart Object and Save for Web with Photoshop in these instances. AI's SFW anti-aliasing isn't stunning when the objects are mixed.


3

At the risk of being frowned upon for not answering your question, I would say this: don't worry about file size. Instead, worry about load time. They're certainly directly correlated, but the difference is that load time is universally applicable. A 2MB file might load instantly on a powerful hosting site such as imgur but not on an inexpensive shared ...


3

I've recently found a tool at https://petercollingridge.appspot.com/svg-editor (source code) that helps optimize SVG files. It has good results in this case, bringing the file size down to 3.7kB, which is just over half the size of the JPG, with a little manual adjustment: Using this tool to optimize SVG files requires significantly less time than golfing ...


3

You learn practical skills by doing them. There's lots of hard evidence that procedural skills learnt from doing are different and deeper than theoretical knowledge from reading. These then expand your creative possibilities through pushing these new skills, experimenting with them, and creating things with them. So, if it's an area you're new to, do it, ...


2

You can: reduce the image size (fewer pixels = smaller file) reduce the frames in the animation reduce the color pallet further posterize the images (larger flatter areas of color compress better for GIFs) Use software that can add additional compression techniques (IIRC, Fireworks is good for this)


2

The only color space to use for image prep for mobile devices is RGB. (You can use others temporarily for retouching purposes, but your final output will always be RGB, so best work in that space all the time.) sRGB is the safest, since you don't know the capabilities of specific devices at design-time. Save for Web is your best option inside Photoshop. ...


2

Photoshop's "Save For Web" isn't the best tool indeed. It compresses PNGs poorly and doesn't fully support alpha channel in 8-bit PNGs. Instead use ImageAlpha+ImageOptim on Mac or TinyPNG+PNGGauntlet on Windows. Here's a real-world test showing that PNGs with alpha channel can be reduced to less than quarter of Photoshop's size.



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