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Sometimes converted SVG don't work fine and it may show some distortions, that's because the SVG file is not perfectly designed to demonstrate curve drawn with bezier curve method or what we call it paths. of course Illustrator is perfect in that. You may see an orthographicaly drawing presented well but when it comes to curves it will distort. My solution ...


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This might also be worth a look... https://developers.google.com/speed/pagespeed/ I've used PageSpeed in the past. It'll test load pages from your site, and offer generally helpful suggestions for speeding up the load times. As others have pointed out - image optimization can also help greatly. On the Mac - I use ImageOptim ... really like the results. ...


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Probably the initial step is more planning than Photoshop's. 1) Do I need an image file? Or can I use something else Background-color. A css gradient. 2) Do I need that file dimensions? or can I use A lower dimension upscaled. Mask the low resolution with something? a pattern over it, a blur, darken it. A pattern. Is the image really worth it to have ...


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Optimize Image Files without affecting Image Quality with Image Optimizer Software This Image Optimizer Software allows you to Compress Images Files with Lossless Image Optimization. Download & Optimize Images in Bulk with Image Optimizer Software on your Windows Computer. You can Optimize png, jpg and jpeg files without compromising the quality of the ...


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Before delivering your final website design, you really should optimise the images with tools that are more focused towards and dedicated to optimising images. Photoshop does okay, but I've seen many people comment that other tools do a better job. From what I hear, ImageMagick is pretty good for this purpose. However, as a command-line-noob I need to spend ...


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From my experience, if you take the 'Saving for Web' routine from Photoshop, this will optimize the image for web. Despite this, you'll still see optimization alerts when testing page speed, but just look at the kb of optimization you will achieve. In most cases it is around 1~5kb. I agree with Scott that you shouldn't get obsessed with page speed. If you ...


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You learn practical skills by doing them. There's lots of hard evidence that procedural skills learnt from doing are different and deeper than theoretical knowledge from reading. These then expand your creative possibilities through pushing these new skills, experimenting with them, and creating things with them. So, if it's an area you're new to, do it, ...


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I would recommend doing them obviously; Furthermore the way you really become an expert on a specific Photoshop/illustrator/any software is by getting the skill you learned on any tutorial and applying it on something completely different that you though of, because following a tutorial in a simple "monkey see monkey do" matter anyone can do but using the ...


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SVGOMG! is an Awesome Web-App for SVG Optimisation According to the creator of the app, SVGOMG is SVGO's "Missing GUI". Running it on the image provided brings it down to just 3.42kb, and just 1.4kb after being gzipped.


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I've recently found a tool at https://petercollingridge.appspot.com/svg-editor (source code) that helps optimize SVG files. It has good results in this case, bringing the file size down to 3.7kB, which is just over half the size of the JPG, with a little manual adjustment: Using this tool to optimize SVG files requires significantly less time than golfing ...


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I am a little surprised no-one has mentioned the "Scour" extension. It's bundled with Inkscape (as of v0.47), and does many of the optimisations mentioned by Ilmari Karonen.


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As Wrzlprmft has already pointed out, over 50% of your SVG file's size is taken up by an embedded PNG bitmap image used to create a fairly subtle shading effect on the controller. Just getting rid of that image, and replacing it with a simple radial gradient, is enough to shrink the SVG down to about 10kb.               ...


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You can convert it to a compressed SVG (SVGZ) and put the image.svgz on your web page: gzip image.svg mv image.svg.gz image.svgz Or, in Adobe Illustrator, simply save as "SVG compressed", which will write an image.svgz file. For your test image it's still larger than the JPG, though: image.jpg: 7268 bytes image.svg: 22385 bytes image.svgz: 14614 ...


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Your SVG contains an embedded pixel graphic for the shade in the bottom right of the controller. This is responsible for about ⅔ of the file size. If you remove it, your SVG file is en par with your JPEG. You can probably achieve an adequately similar effect with a gradient. Other techniques of reducing SVG file size include: Remove all Metadata and ...



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