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40

There's a seperate question on which is better: Are Macs preferable to PCs for handling graphics software? For the question of why Macs are more popular, there's a very simple answer: Almost all art colleges and design schools bought Macs back in the days when Macs were unquestionably better for design (Alan G's and Horatio's answers below detail how) Art ...


29

Super short answer: History. In 1984, when the Mac was launched, it was the first computer that was ideal for desktop publishing needs. This included a GUI, WYSIWYG drawing tools, decent typographic tools (for the time) and a nice relationship to the laser printer (The Apple LaserWriter). It got a foothold, and that's that. Today, it's just a preference. ...


16

I think a lot of the legacy reasons have been established here, so I won't address that. I recently purchased a new computer (after asking this community about what hardware matters to a designer), and I went with a Mac Mini. My full-time job for four years had me working on a PC, I like Windows 7 just fine, and I'm comfortable with Ubuntu as well, so when ...


13

Two things not mentioned in other answers that were keys to establishing the Mac as a DTP platform in the early days: The original Mac supported PostScript out of the box due to a brilliant collaboration between Adobe and Apple, so that it could provide hinting for low-resolution output on screens and laser printers (300 dpi is low resolution in ...


8

The main reason for Apple having a large design presence is "tradition." Apple went all out inserting their computers into the design school workflow as far back as the late 1980s. Because of this, the OS became the standard target for prepress and commercial printing hardware and the Windows versions of the drivers for these RIP devices (etc) was a ...


7

I believe many years ago Mac were better suited to Graphic Design. I remember hearing about the screen being superior at least. These days there is no difference as the majority of features and software are comparable. I think once you establish yourself in an industry as the go-to brand, old habits die hard. It is like Bing trying to compete with Google - ...


5

If your needs are that simple, you can probably do what you need using the free, web-based and popular http://pixlr.com/ which supports PSD files. It has a simpler interface and gentler learning curve for people familiar with photoshop than the obvious other free alternative GIMP (which you could always download any time you needed any more features or if ...


5

From a hand-made measurement, the corner radius seems to be 7px. Plus 1 px, if you include the left drop shadow:


5

When Mac applications come with their own fonts, you can often find these within the application package (which is technically just a folder): Right-click on the application icon within the Applications folder and choose Show Package Contents. A new Finder window containing subfolders will open. Instead of rummaging each and every subfolder for the font ...


5

Fonts Mac OS X arguably comes with better fonts out of the box, but people can argue about this. Where it has a clear advantage, though, is management and ease of use. The built-in font chooser on a mac is leagues ahead of what you get in Windows programs, and the built-in font manager is simple and powerful (for some purposes you still need 3rd party ...


4

Price is not the issue. High end hardware comes at a high end price. Apple's hardware is high end because it is intended for performance purposes. Similar quality PCs typically sell at a similar price point, minus a few bucks for their lower status in the market (but not much). Don't forget about resale value. If you are a freelancer (there are many in the ...


4

as a designer that uses BOTH Mac and PC for designing. i'll admit that OSX runs much smoother and more reliably than Win 7 or 8. on similarly spec'd machines. the main advantage is color, well use to be color, if you look in any design program you'll see color profile "Adobe RGB (1998)" all mac monitors stuck to this for years as its standard, allowing the ...


4

A good OSX alternative to Photoshop is Pixelmator. It supports PSD files but the picture might be a little different because it doesn't support all features (like layer styles).


4

There's also a paid one here. It says it's available for Illustrator, Fireworks, Visio, OmniGraffle, Axure, Keynote and PowerPoint, and the Illlustrator single license is apparently something like $24.


4

Going to the "Window" menu, and checking "Application Frame" will condense all toolbars and files into one window in Illustrator and Photoshop (using CS6).


3

As mentioned in my comment, I think Photoshop Elements 8 is a good investment for any cash-strapped company that needs to edit/view PSD files and work with designers who use Photoshop. However, Gimp and Paint.NET also support PSD files. I'm not sure the extent to which they support them, but I think Gimp's support could be better than Pixelmator since Gimp ...


3

XML is text. Any plain text editor will work. You simply don't want a rich text editor such as word. You can use Text Edit, the default text application on the Mac OS. But you must go into its preferences and tell it to ignore RTF commands on open and save. I prefer BBEdit from barebones.com. But that's merely my preference.


3

As you can read in the iOS Human Interface Guidelines, you'll actually need quite a number of icons for the different devices/purposes. The iPad requires a different icon size, while the retina display introduced with the iPhone 4 doubles the resolution. In your case you should look at the Application icon and/or the Web clip icon (which are luckily the ...


3

From my answer here: You need a font management tool of some kind to help you organize your fonts into sets of your liking. There are a number of them out there; Extensis Suitcase Fusion and FontXplorer Pro come to mind. From the FontXplorer website... Is font management for you? Font management is for anyone who uses more than just a handful of ...


3

Arguments about quality, total cost of ownership, ease of use and style aside... Historically, the Mac was the only choice for serious, professional DTP and Pre-Press. This was down to its 'WYSIWYG' screen, availability of good software and the far superior font rendering the Mac offered over the PC. Nowadays it's true to say that the PC has caught up a ...


2

I'd give Pixelmator a try http://www.pixelmator.com/


2

Does it have to be vector? Here is a raster one for Photoshop.


2

You want to export the map as SVG or PDF which are Vector formats. These are scalable** without loss of quality. This way you will not need to specify pixel dimensions at all, leaving the rasterization to the Printer and their plate-making RIP. As to the question of a 1:1 size preview: you merely need to zoom in until you can hold a real-world ruler to the ...


2

From my experience, Macs are widely used in the graphic design industry for two main reasons: i) Mac OS was easier to use than Windows or Linux in the past. To a lesser degree it still is. ii) Apple gives great attention to the visual design of its products. This appeals to people who are interested in the visual aspect of things such as graphic designers. ...


2

Other answers have covered the history well. It is agreed that today you can setup a PC or a Mac to work just a well for graphic design work. So let’s think about a few other things… There is a factor of control, in a lot of companies all PC are “owned” by the IT department and they try to make everyone have a standard PC, with a standard setup. You ...


2

Super stable, great ui, great file management and storage, superior graphic engine and advanced graphic memory usage and threading.


2

Hollywood runs on Linux, even Pixar does that. Just because for rendering graphics to hard disk, you don't even need a GUI, well, a headless CPU will do the work. So, as long as Linux is capable of execute the same rendering frameworks over the same CPUs / GPUs. It is cheaper. Mac are used for the creative phase. Any other OS is used for mass-production. ...


2

There is no difference, it comes down to personal preference. You're going to spend a lot of time at your computer, you should love it. You don't have to justify your love to anyone


2

Accessing your Image Plane (the "Input"): The "Input" you're looking for I assume is from 4:44 in your video. They made a change to image plane connections in Maya 2013. From the release notes: Beginning Maya 2013, the imagePlane node, which was previously a dependency node, is now a shape node. A few ways way to get to the image plan settings is ...


1

It looks a lot like Trebuchet MS, but the 'g' has a closed loop. I did a search in Google Fonts and Open Sans looks a lot like it: http://www.google.com/fonts/specimen/Open+Sans But the O seems a little thicker than your sample. I'd definitely say its a humanist font.



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