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4

I don't have a sample to hand, but from memory of the box I used to have: The majority of the box is printed black The whole printed area is 'matte laminated' (printers often say 'matte lam') i.e. a thin non-glossy, transparent plastic film is bonded on after printing and ink drying. You ask about precise quantification of the effect, however printers ...


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If you understand the packaging process from an engineering and production perspective, then not much else is different. That part can be a big deal, depending on the type of package you're producing. One obvious difference that bears repeating: Physical mockups are critical. Don't even bother presenting flat mockups to the client unless they are unusually ...


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I would research screenprinting shops. You should be able to find some that work on a small scale and use the right inks You might have some luck looking into sublimation. The feasibility depends on the kind of plastic of the bag, though. I think it should be some kind of polyester. Other options would need more of an DIY-approach: Stencils. You could ...


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Prop department or companies that specialise in them. I found some more interesting examples. And for the downvoter: It is not merely OK to ask and answer your own question, it is explicitly encouraged. Red Apple Cigarettes from Quentin Tarantino: Heisler Beer from My Name is Earl, Weeds and United States of Tara: Gannon Car Rentals from Lost and ...


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The logos and other graphics are generally designed by game artists. The game artists help design everything from sprites, textures, user interfaces, and yes the logos. The fake products are usually idealized by designers, and level designers. They do not need other companies to do it for them, that's why they work in development teams. They can all use ...


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This is going to depend on your printer, so you should seek advice from them regarding cut-guide set up. What you or I always, maybe, or never normally do might have little bearing on how they want it submitted. If I were to do this naively, I see that hot-stamping is a hot-die process which means that the printer will need to have dies made. Therefore, ...


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No vendor is going to be excited about that “opportunity” unless you can show them what amazing PR they'll get out of the deal. Except they probably won't, so no luck there. The way I see it, you have two options: Find a shop with with one of those print-on-anything inkjet devices and have them imprint a sheet of plastic that fits your specs. ...


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Assuming the box is cardboard, flexography is the general process used in manufacturing. As for doing it at home, it all depends on your printer. Some printers can print to cardboard but most of the time, the quality is not great. Also, it can bleed very easily on normal cardboard. Your best bet is to use sticker paper if it's just a one off project. A quick ...


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If I'm interpreting your question correctly, you are printing design drafts on the office printer in order to test them out, you have no color management in place in your workflow, and you don't possess a Pantone swatch book so you're thinking of picking Pantone colors in your application that seem to match a given printed color. It's evident that your ...


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Firstly, I would check the printer specifications on recommended paper weight (if they are listed).I have printed on heavy Bristol without any problems, however my printer is likely not the same as yours. Run a test print but turn down the amount of ink your printer uses if its an inkjet (I'm not sure how laser would work out). This will help reduce some ...


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I'd add that if you're interested in packaging, consider a complete example with designing an 'unfolded' package. As if, if you get an idea for a something a little 'boxy', consider what the design will look like when you take the box and unfold it into a flat sheet. Consider how will your design affect the production system and costs? What are going to be ...


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As with any graphic design project I really think it all starts with an idea or a problem that you want to solve. When I was going through school I remember making packing designs out of thin air to meet requirements, but the result was always incomplete-- no matter how visually striking you can make something, if it doesn't serve a purpose or solve a goal ...


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Custom dimensions are going to be a hurdle. If you want exactly 24" x 20" x 10", you'll have a tough time unless you can find a company that uses this as one of their standard sizes. I would ask the company if they have non-printed bags available, likely they can supply this in a smaller quantity. You could then take it to a print shop and have them print ...


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In-design is great for page layout (for books, leaflets and magazines) - but for packaging and more intricate (die-cut) shapes, you would be much better using illustrator. You will be able to import the pdf and use vector shapes to help you position images acurately. (In-design is a habit in the media industry due to historical page work and automation, ...


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UW-Stout, WI has a packaging engineering program: http://www.uwstout.edu/programs/bsp/ Alas, it's not part of the art program, though that also has a good reputation: http://www.uwstout.edu/programs/bfaa/



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