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A really great and visceral analogy from this Smashing Magazine article is with music: imagine music with every note played with only minimal and equal (or no) pauses in between. That's no music, that's noise. Whitespace fills the same role in visuals as silence does in music. It is, in gestalt terms, the space to the figure. With too little space, the ...


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I think it is relative on where that banner is. If it is an internal company campain, or banner, everyone should know it is refering to the company they are working in. So it dosen't matter. If it is an external people the ones that are reading it, the "correct" visual syntax would be put the company logo (or name) before the afirmation "our". This is ...


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To my knowledge, there is no way or preferences settings to really insert a copied element exactly at the same coordinate relative to the document that welcomes the "placed" elements. But there are some good old tricks that can save you some time. Maybe you already know them. Personally, I love using the coordinate numbers because it's the most precise ...


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From http://creativepro.com/indesign-how-using-liquid-layout/ Liquid Layout can move and/or resize objects for you any time you change the page size or orientation—and not just for digital output formats. It’s highly useful when working with multiple print formats, too. For example, let’s say you’re laying out a non-fiction book, and that you’ll be ...


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If you're looking for an easier way to manage responsive designs and you have an Adobe CC subscription, Adobe has a product called Edge Reflow that makes designing for various resolutions much easier. Here is a video from adobe about it. But esentially you can import your PSDs and manipulate them so that they'll change on different resolutions. Edge Reflow ...


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Design the mobile layout only. Then work with the developers to reflow things as needed for other views. The reason for mobile first is that it forces you to prioritize content and functionality down to the necessities. It gives you a streamlined design that, more often than not, is also perfect for desktop, albeit perhaps laid out differently. The reason ...


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There's a new (a few days ago) way for you to do this. I was just updating Photoshop and you may be happy to learn that you can now create multiple art boards in one Photoshop document. This will allow you to have all 3 of your layouts in one file. Here's the video of how this new feature: https://helpx.adobe.com/photoshop/how-to/design-with-artboards.html


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I agree with Max Tokman above and would add that being a coder and designer for my company, I've fallen into the trap of creating a mobile layout that was very difficult to replicate in code. That said, you also need to take into account who the target audience will be. If this is a site that will primarily be used on a phone, then attention should be paid ...


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Contrary to popular mem of designing "mobile first", I would recommend designing desktop-only using 12 column grid; then letting developers build all the mobile states using standard responsive CSS framework such as Bootstrap. There are a number of positives to that, as we learned in our own web development process: You cannot sell client on mobile layout ...


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It is a good idea to make a design example of how the page should look like on the target devices. But as there are too many screen sizes it's not practical to make a separate design for all of them. As a web developer, I would suggest making the responsive version of the designs for the homepage only, for the following screen sizes: Desktop : (about ...


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Yes, by using "next styles" – a feature of Paragraph Styles. First the preparation: at the end of each line in your poem should be a hard return, meaning each line is it's own paragraph. Then create three paragraph styles: one for each of the first three lines. Paragraph style #1 has no left indent, #2 has a small left indent, and #3 has a big indent. ...


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Maybe you could try "nested styles" for indesign.


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You do not need any transparency. If each page has a manually created yellow background.... Place your greyscale tiff or psd in InDesign. Select the image - The content, not the image frame. Using the Attributes Panel tick Overprint Fill Choose View > Overprint Preview So you will see it on screen as it will appear when overprinted. Export ...


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There is no need to use transparency nor "replace the white" if by that you mean edit the files. You can tint greyscale tiffs. This allows you to make the change without editing the original file and eliminates any color matching problems between the placed image and the inDesign swatch color(s) Place the greyscale. Select the image container using the ...



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