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8

In printing, a spot colour is an ink that is premixed to the colour required and printed from a dedicated plate, rather than being simulated by overprinting dots of ink from the cyan, magenta, yellow and black plates (4 colour CMYK process). It may be a colour which cannot be achieved in CMYK, such as metallic or neon. It may be a colour that is achievable ...


6

To answer your second question first, Pantone is a color-matching system, like Trumatch or Toyo. It's just a standard so everybody can agree on what "kelly green" is. In Photoshop, click on the Set Foreground Color box in the vertical toolbar. When the Color Picker comes up, click on Color Libraries. In the dropdown menu at the top of the box, you have a ...


5

Cyan is one of the four primaries used in CMYK, or four-color process printing. Cyan is NOT used in formulation of any PANTONE spot color. The shading of Cyan is defined under ISO 2846-1. PANTONE CYAN refers to Pantone's representation of Cyan, which is found in the following products only: PANTONE COLOR BRIDGE PANTONE CMYK COLOR GUIDE


5

This is one of those bizarre problems, the answer to which is important, but fairly non-obvious. Your best CMYK<>Pantone match is obtained not from the application, but using the Pantone Color Bridge book (not the software version in your applications). Truly. But I know we all like to do it in software, so here are the gotchas for AI and ID: In ...


5

You don't say what the end product is supposed to be, so I can only give with limited advice. To find specific Pantone colors as RGB swatches, use this page on the Pantone website. Since you have the RGB values already, you could also just type them into the color picker of the gimp (or equivalent). To get tints, follow Lauren's suggestion, starting with ...


4

Am I right to ignore Illustrator and only really view my handheld swatch for colour accuracy? Yes. That is the entire point of the Pantone system...you can't reliably replicate printed colors on a screen, so you need to go with the printed samples. For that matter, it's hard to even trust CMYK rendering on screen. Also, you really should be asking ...


4

Select a specific Pantone color in Photoshop Open the Color Picker click the Color Libraries Type the number of the Pantone color you want Click Ok how do you find a similar pantone colour for this CMYK color Open the Color Picker Input the CMYK values Click the Color Libraries button Photoshop will automatically choose the closest Pantone to ...


3

the easy answer is, Yes and No... as a professional designer, my boss directs me to use the color of the year style guide they put out, she particularly likes Radiant Orchid. so i HAVE to use it. so yes, it can directly affect graphic designers. in reality, the pantone color of the year are a forecasting for the fashion industry, they look and see what is ...


3

You could always buy them by the chips if you only need them temporary: PANTONE PLASTIC STANDARD Chips Pantone Chip Journal Google Search for Pantone Chips Another option would be to see if someone is selling them used (local sign shop/print shop). Some shops do believe that a rotation of 2 years is standard to purchase and stay up to date with Pantone ...


3

This is applicable to Creative Suite 6 applications only, previous versions of Adobe software will not be effected by this. Adobe/Pantone felt it was a good idea to include the Pantone+ color books in CS6 applications. The Pantone+ books are built upon LAB values and do not contain CMYK color builds. Previous versions of the software included both LAB and ...


3

In order to break out spot colors, you must use the Channels Panel. There is no other way if you need proper separations. This is often one reason Photoshop is simply a poor tool to use if you need Pantone colored-text, especially small text. Rather than write a lengthy tutorial on spot colors here are a few links to follow (I'm not specifically endorsing ...


3

There is no substitute for an actual Pantone swatchbook if you are a) specifying color for a project and want to know accurately how it will print, or b) if you're putting together a color board for presentation to a client. There is no on-screen rendering that will show all PMS colors 100% accurately, or even some parts of the CMYK gamut -- the color gamuts ...


3

Design is all about problem solving. Sometimes, you pick a color palette because you need it to work with colorblind people. Sometimes, you study color theory and learn that certain colors evoke certain moods, so you pick your palette based on that. Sometimes, you want to be rooted in a certain historical period, so you find art and design from that time and ...


2

For total accuracy, you would have to use actual Pantone color swatches, as e100 says. If the magazine is more than a year or two old, then that level of accuracy becomes a bit academic because the original colors will have changed due to fading. You can get "in the ballpark" fairly easily, though, with Photoshop. Open the scanned document in Photoshop. ...


2

No, I don't believe there is. Apart from anything else, the scan is an RGB abstraction of the actual printed colour. What you would normally do is compare the original printed item with Pantone's own printed Colour Guides, and find a match by eye. Additionally, if you are talking about a regular magazine page, I don't think the Pantone device would ...


2

What is a spot/Pantone colour? Colours that are created without using any of the four "Colour Process" colour screens or dots are referred to as spot or solid colours. Pantone Inc. [ink?] has a variety of stock colour mixes organized by numbers and names for easy reference that are in wide use. They are called Pantone Colours by many. Anyone can mix a spot ...


2

re: how do I pick one? My favorite anecdote for this is from many years ago as I was chaperoning a group of design students through the Walker Art Center's in-house design team's offices. They had us gather as they showed us how they pick colors for their posters, which were often two-color spot printed. The process was as such: someone grabs all the ...


2

Obviously there's no way to get or maintain a color match across multiple different screens whose calibrations are out of your control, but that's no reason not to try for a decent compromise. My approach to this kind of situation with Pantone colors is to follow the Lab settings given for the swatch, then adjust by eye as needed. In most cases, ...


2

Really, I think the only answer is "you can't do that." It is just not possible to do "perfect color match " in the manner you are describing. You can spend months working on a solution, and my monitor will display a completely different black. I have a dual monitor setup here with two differently branded monitors, both profiled using a colorimetric device. ...


2

If you choose another colour system You'll have to speak to your printer about which colours they accept. They may even match to a physical object, paint sample or something else. It's worth noting that in a situation like that, they're probably just going to pull out a Pantone book and match as closely as they can to your sample. If you choose to use a ...


2

To get an approximation to the RGB of the tint value, you need a bit of arithmetic: If the RGB of your Pantone colour is (0, 101, 96) and the background is pure white, i.e. (255,255,255) then a 50% tint is pretty much halfway between the two - and that calculation is done for each of R,G,B separately. And the answer is: R=127, G=178, B=176 . That's because ...


2

There is no such thing as a definitive conversion from a PMS colour to RGB, so if the client hasn't already determined what RGB value to use, and there isn't any previous web work to form a precedent, I'd recommend that you provide a few on-screen samples and get them to choose what they think is best by comparing with a Pantone swatch at their desks. ...


2

Are you using the Pantone color as a reference to use it on the web or for print? The only way to see colors accurately is to use a correctly calibrated monitor setup using the correct profiles in your software program. Even then it best it will be an approximation. One problem is that the Pantone system is subtractive and a monitor is additive, they have ...


2

After comparing the current Facebook page image and the one on Image Shack, my guess is that jpeg compression is part of the problem. The pink is not even across the letters, indicating heavy compression artifacts in relation to the size of the image. Facebook seems to be all jpeg, all the way, so no matter what you upload it will end up as a jpeg. It will ...


2

Digital printers are not built to allow for Pantone colors. Some digital printers get close if they are offering 6 and 8 color printing but I never seen some guarantee it. Typically if someone wants a roll-up with Pantone colors we find the CMYK companion from the the cards. Another alternative since the cards are very expensive is this or this. Be ...


2

From what I understand, the only real difference in Pantone's "Field Guide" is the tear out chips. If you need chips to attach with client proofs or whatever and you don't want to buy a separate chip book, go with the Field Guide. Personally, I never use chips any more. I just stick with the standard fan books. If for some reason I need a sample of the ...


2

NOTE: This got way longer than I expected, and I purposely glossed over a LOT of detail. If you'd like me to elaborate, just ask. PMS Colors - Absolutely brilliant when used as designed for pre-mixed spot color offset printing. You can be assured the color you saw in your Pantone book is very closely represented in your final printed piece. The problem ...


1

1) Illustrator CS5 and CS6 must have the same color settings (Edit > Color Settings) for CMYK values to be the same. If you have mis-matched color settings, values will change. 2) Regarding Pantone colors, there is a marked difference between CS5 and CS6. CS6 uses the new Pantone Plus libraries which are built only on LAB values. Previous Pantone ...


1

A standards guide should provide each color in the three relevant formulations: Spot (Pantone) Print process (CMYK) Screen (hex or RGB) The values for each are spelled out in text under a single swatch for exact reference. It doesn't matter what the user's screen displays since they always have the numbers right in front of them. A spot color in InD ...


1

Illustrator (or Pantone actually) changed the way Pantone colors are build in CS6. You don't mention what version you are using, but based on what you do describe, I'd guess you are using CS6. Prior to CS6 Pantone colors were built on their CMYK formulas. Starting with CS6, Pantone colors are built based upon their LAB formulas. The result is much less ...



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